Jeff Morris
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Rescooped by Jeff Morris from Tracking the Future
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Computer science: The learning machines

Computer science: The learning machines | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it

Using massive amounts of data to recognize photos and speech, deep-learning computers are taking a big step towards true artificial intelligence.


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R Schumacher & Associates LLC's curator insight, January 15, 2014 1:43 PM

The monikers such as "deep learning" may be new, but Artificial Intelligence has always been the Holy Grail of computer science.  The applications are many, and the path is becoming less of an uphill climb.  

luiy's curator insight, February 26, 2014 6:19 AM

Deep learning itself is a revival of an even older idea for computing: neural networks. These systems, loosely inspired by the densely interconnected neurons of the brain, mimic human learning by changing the strength of simulated neural connections on the basis of experience. Google Brain, with about 1 million simulated neurons and 1 billion simulated connections, was ten times larger than any deep neural network before it. Project founder Andrew Ng, now director of the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at Stanford University in California, has gone on to make deep-learning systems ten times larger again.

 

Such advances make for exciting times in artificial intelligence (AI) — the often-frustrating attempt to get computers to think like humans. In the past few years, companies such as Google, Apple and IBM have been aggressively snapping up start-up companies and researchers with deep-learning expertise. For everyday consumers, the results include software better able to sort through photos, understand spoken commands and translate text from foreign languages. For scientists and industry, deep-learning computers can search for potential drug candidates, map real neural networks in the brain or predict the functions of proteins.

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Graphene can host exotic new quantum electronic states at its edges

Graphene can host exotic new quantum electronic states at its edges | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it

Graphene has become an all-purpose wonder material, spurring armies of researchers to explore new possibilities for this two-dimensional lattice of pure carbon. But new research at MIT has found additional potential for the material by uncovering unexpected features that show up under some extreme conditions — features that could render graphene suitable for exotic uses such as quantum computing.


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Michael Ravensbergen's curator insight, December 28, 2013 7:23 AM

The beauty of graphene and research!!