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High-Fat Foods That Are Great For Your Waistline (Really!)

High-Fat Foods That Are Great For Your Waistline (Really!) | JCM Literacy-Malecha | Scoop.it
There’s a myth that has been permeating our society for decades – that fat makes you fat. The concept is outdated and simply not true. It’s the sugar, gluten and chemicals in our food that are the real culprit.

Via The BioSync Team
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The BioSync Team's curator insight, May 18, 2013 9:31 AM

More than 500,000 people die each year from coronary heart disease with saturated and trans fats a contributing factor. GOOD FATS however will lower cholesterol and decrease the risk of heart disease.


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Read More:  http://www.refinery29.com/good-fats


Steve Kingsley's curator insight, June 5, 2013 7:59 PM

That has been my personal experience too!

Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge
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Getting serious about evaluating professional development

Getting serious about evaluating professional development | JCM Literacy-Malecha | Scoop.it
Learning Forward is the nation's largest nonprofit membership association focused solely on ensuring success for all students through effective professional learning and school improvement.

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Teresa McDaniel's curator insight, June 6, 2013 10:25 PM

Shift from professional development to professional learning

Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from DEEPER Literacy Focused Instruction
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Plagiarism and the link: How the web makes attribution easier -- and more complicated | paidContent

Plagiarism and the link: How the web makes attribution easier -- and more complicated | paidContent | JCM Literacy-Malecha | Scoop.it

Nate Thayer, the writer who touched off a debate this week about how freelancers are compensated, found himself embroiled in another controversy on Friday when he was accused of plagiarizing large parts of the piece that The Atlantic wanted him to re-work for free. In his defence, Thayer and his editor said links weren’t included in the original version due to an editing error, a mistake they later corrected. This failed to satisfy some of the writer’s critics, however, including the author of the piece that Thayer based some of his reporting on.

 

If nothing else, the incident helps reinforce just how blurry the line is between plagiarism and sloppy attribution — and also how the the web makes it easier to provide attribution via hyperlinks, but at the same time makes it harder to define what is plagiarism or content theft and what isn’t.

 

To Jeremy Duns, who first blew the whistle on what he said was Thayer’s plagiarism, the case seemed open and shut: chunks of the article about North Korea and basketball, including a number of quotes, appeared to have been lifted straight from a piece by San Diego Union-Tribune writer Mark Zeigler on the same topic in 2006. And there was virtually no attribution of any kind in the original version of Thayer’s story, which appeared at the NKNews.com site, apart from one oblique reference to the Union-Tribune — and no links.

 

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Mary Reilley Clark's curator insight, March 16, 2013 6:00 PM

Great example for students, inclluding the comments in which mention is made of one commentor changing another's Wikipedia entry! 

Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from Common Core: Rigor with Vigor
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Going Paperless With Informational Text, Dr. Teresa Littrell McDaniel

Going Paperless With Informational Text, Dr. Teresa Littrell McDaniel | JCM Literacy-Malecha | Scoop.it
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