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Reconsidering Rigor in Schools — Medium

Reconsidering Rigor in Schools — Medium | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it
“There is a momentous, broad-based cultural shift underway that has struck at the roots of every industrialized system of education. The…

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Shanahan on Literacy: Six Pieces of Advice on Teaching with Complex Text

Shanahan on Literacy: Six Pieces of Advice on Teaching with Complex Text | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it
            But the standards actually do mean that teachers need to teach students to read harder texts than in the past. Just teaching level N books well won’t be sufficient. Kids’ reading is now being tested on texts at those higher levels--that’s part of the reason why reading scores dropped so much this year. If kids spend all their time reading easy texts, don’t be surprised if they struggle when immersed in more complicated language and ideas.

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The 50 smartest public high schools in America

The 50 smartest public high schools in America | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it
Determined by graduation rates, performance on SAT/ACT and AP tests, and student and parent reviews.

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Rcheck the demographics of these schools!

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Mel Riddile's curator insight, March 29, 5:03 PM

Rcheck the demographics of these schools!

Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 29, 9:22 PM

Rcheck the demographics of these schools!

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Two Barriers to Teacher Improvement

Two Barriers to Teacher Improvement | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it
It is with our judgments as with our watches: no two go just alike, yet each believes his own. Alexander Pope One of the difficulties inherent in challenging teachers’ judgments is that when those judgements appear to be contradicted teachers sometimes say, “Well, it works for me and my students.” This is hard to challenge.

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Chunking Improves Practice: Microlearning for Macro Results

Chunking Improves Practice: Microlearning for Macro Results | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it
We’ve all been guilty of the “just one more level” rule when playing a video game. It usually happens when playing what should be a quick level of Candy Crush...

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Mel Riddile's curator insight, October 9, 2015 11:18 AM

Learners learn best when content is presented in small, manageable chunks accompanied by frequent feedback.

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Teacher Voice and Teacher Leadership

A new CAP report highlights six districts that are using teacher leadership and labor-management collaboration to successfully implement the Common Core State Standards.

 

"This report describes districts throughout the country that have taken collaborative approaches between management and unions to ensure that teachers have significant voice and leadership in implementation of the Common Core. In many cases, these collaborative approaches are not new. Districts and unions across the country—many of them profiled in this report—have been working together to involve teachers in meaningful ways for decades, but these systems have taken on new importance with the rollout of the Common Core."


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Teaching Growth Mindset

Teaching Growth Mindset | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it
All of us should be teaching a growth mindset. This incredible graphic and Carol Dweck's TED Talk are two perfect companions for teaching growth mindset.

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Leadership is Key to Positive Schools

Leadership is Key to Positive Schools | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it
Leadership is essential to success, so make sure you know who the personalities. Admin remember this when working with staff and staff remember it when working with students. Relationships and empowerment go a long way to investment and happy school community is one that is willing to innovate.

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Learning Through Reflection

Learning Through Reflection | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it

Teachers who promote reflective classrooms ensure that students are fully engaged in the process of making meaning. They organize instruction so that students are the producers, not just the consumers, of knowledge. To best guide children in the habits of reflection, these teachers approach their role as that of "facilitator of meaning making."

In the role of facilitator, the teacher acts as an intermediary between the learner and the learning, guiding each student to approach the learning activity in a strategic way. The teacher helps each student monitor individual progress, construct meaning from the content learned and from the process of learning it, and apply the learnings to other contexts and settings. Learning becomes a continual process of engaging the mind that transforms the mind.


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Confusing Ohio test results are latest effort to unravel Common Core’s promise

Confusing Ohio test results are latest effort to unravel Common Core’s promise | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it
Advocates hoped to be able to compare student performance across state lines, but that’s still hard to do.

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Jamie Dammann's curator insight, October 25, 2015 9:56 PM

Local, State, Federal

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(Re)Defining Student Engagement: What are students saying and doing?

(Re)Defining Student Engagement: What are students saying and doing? | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it

"The best evidence for student engagement is what students are saying and doing as a consequence of what the teacher does, or has done, or has planned." - Charlotte Danielson


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Mel Riddile's curator insight, September 25, 2015 10:26 AM

"Engagement (student involvement in instruction) can be described in a variety of ways. I think too often engagement is exclusively predefined by educators as “hands on”, “students doing more talking than the teacher”, or “active”. These descriptors may all be key indicators of engagement. But the definition should not stop there."

Alison Wiebenga's curator insight, September 26, 2015 10:17 AM

A recent observer told our staff that we needed to focus more on student engagement.  I agree with this author.  You don't have to put on a dog and pony show with all the bells and whistles to meet the demand for engagement.  What you need is instruction that gives students the tools they need to actively participate in their own learning, tools like confidence, feeling comfortable enough to take a risk, skills and strategies, etc.

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Education Gap Between Rich and Poor Is Growing Wider

Education Gap Between Rich and Poor Is Growing Wider | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it
Racial disparities in education have narrowed significantly, but the achievement gap between more affluent and less privileged children is wider than ever.

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Mel Riddile's curator insight, September 24, 2015 7:41 AM

"Only 5 percent of Americans ages 25 to 34 whose parents didn’t finish high school have a college degree. By comparison, the average across 20 rich countries in an analysis by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development is almost 20 percent."

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More than a 'Little' literacy in crosshairs - River Towns

More than a 'Little' literacy in crosshairs - River Towns | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it
Since founder Todd Bol began distributing his creations five years ago, the Hudson-based Little Free Library has grown exponentially.


The nonprofit organization...
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Schools Are Fragile

Schools Are Fragile | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it
There are no shortage of ideas about how to improve schools. Zac and I wrote a book filled with them. And every year, principals and teachers come together to try to figure out how to make their sc…

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Learning Styles Don't Exist - Dan Willingham


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Chunking Improves Practice: Microlearning for Macro Results

Chunking Improves Practice: Microlearning for Macro Results | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it
We’ve all been guilty of the “just one more level” rule when playing a video game. It usually happens when playing what should be a quick level of Candy Crush...

Via Mel Riddile
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Mel Riddile's curator insight, October 9, 2015 11:18 AM

Learners learn best when content is presented in small, manageable chunks accompanied by frequent feedback.

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Principals, Are Your Observations Improving Teaching and Learning?

Principals, Are Your Observations Improving Teaching and Learning? | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it
Observing teachers in order to improve practice can only improve results if teacher practice is in relationship with the causes of student performance.

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Do students remember what they learn in school?

Do students remember what they learn in school? | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it

The year-end cumulative examination used in many classrooms suggests a natural experiment; what if students took the same exam a second time, say, a year later? Many experiments have relied on this basic structure, with the second exam composed of different questions than the first but testing the same concepts. The upshot? There’s less forgetting than you might think.  - See more at: http://www.aft.org/ae/fall2015/willingham#.dpuf


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Our ugly war on teachers must end now

Our ugly war on teachers must end now | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it
Republicans and Democrats can agree on one thing: Demonizing teachers. It's the "reformers" doing the most harm

 

But Elise Gould of the Economic Policy Institute dug out perhaps the worst numbers in the report. With September’s data in, we can see how many teachers went back to school this year. And Gould finds that the tremendous gap that opened up when local budgets crashed during the recession has not come close to being filled.

At the peak, we had 8.1 million public K-12 education teachers and staff in July 2008. Seven years later, we have far less, 7.8 million, despite a larger population of students that need to be served. According to EPI, the local public education shortfall, accounting for additional student enrollment, is 410,000 jobs.

This means that classrooms built for 25 or 30 students now have 35 or 40 in them. It means that kids don’t get the same level of personalized instruction, or in some cases any attention at all. It means that programs like art and music have to be excised, or extracurricular activities, simply because there are no resources available to staff them.

Obviously the main culprit of this tremendous and damaging shortfall in student learning is austerity budgeting around the country. Most funding for public schools comes from the states, and they have not rebounded to pre-recession funding levels, nor have they made education enough of a priority to keep up. Though teaching children is routinely stated as our nation’s most important priority in political campaigns, we treat it in the exact opposite manner in budget documents.


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Bryan Kay's curator insight, October 22, 2015 8:05 PM

I chose this resource to provide a better understanding on teacher issues.

 

I too, agree that teachers are viewed more harshly than ever. In the past, parents would scold kids for poor performance in the classroom, now they are pointing the finger at schools and the teachers. 

 

As a future principal I cannot be defensive! I have to think rationally when communicating with parents that feel we are doing a disservice to their kids.

Heather Harriso's curator insight, October 23, 2015 10:54 PM

Funding from all levels should not dictate that a classroom built for 25 students now holds 35.  This is not a great educational delivery for the kids and this does not save a buck.  Maybe the next president will see the current education issues in America. 

KaylaHeinlein's curator insight, October 25, 2015 11:18 AM

This article gives great insight how there is a shift from students being held accountable for their grades to teachers.  Teachers are getting blamed for low test scores from parents.   This is a great article to consider when dealing with upset parents. 

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Instead of Opting Students Out of Tests, Teach Them to Take Tests Right

Instead of Opting Students Out of Tests, Teach Them to Take Tests Right | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it

Used correctly, tests can help students achieve three crucial aims:

supporting student recall (tests force students to pull information from their own heads, enhancing retention);enhancing their awareness of their own mental processes (in the process of being tested and getting feedback, students fine-tune their sense of what they know and don’t know);nurturing the noncognitive skills students develop from facing challenges (tests represent a kind of controlled adversity, an ideal arena for honing skills like resilience and perseverance).
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4 Fantastic and Free Professional Learning Networks for Teachers

4 Fantastic and Free Professional Learning Networks for Teachers | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it
Across the world, educators are turning to personal learning networks to get inspiration and trade best practices. Here are four that offer great resources for teachers at no cost.

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First brain-to-brain ‘telepathy’ communication via the Internet

First brain-to-brain ‘telepathy’ communication via the Internet | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it

The first brain-to-brain telepathy-like communication between two participants via the Internet has been performed by University of Washington researchers. The experiment used a question-and-answer game. The goal is for the “inquirer” to determine which object the “respondent” is looking at from a list of possible objects. The inquirer sends a question (e.g., “Does it fly?) to the respondent, who answers “yes” or “no” by mentally focusing on one of two flashing LED lights attached to the monitor. The respondent is wearing an electroencephalography (EEG) helmet.


By focusing on the “yes” light, the EEG device generates send a signal to the inquirer via the Internet to activate a magnetic coil positioned behind the inquirer’s head, which stimulates the visual cortex and causes the inquirer to see a flash of light (known as a “phosphene”). A “no” signal works the same way, but is not strong enough to activate the coil.


The experiment, detailed today in an open access paper in PLoS ONE, is the first to show that two brains can be directly linked to allow one person to guess what’s on another person’s mind. It is “the most complex brain-to-brain experiment, I think, that’s been done to date in humans,” said lead author Andrea Stocco, an assistant professor of psychology and researcher at UW’s Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences.


The experiment was carried out in dark rooms in two UW labs located almost a mile apart and involved five pairs of participants, who played 20 rounds of the question-and-answer game. Each game had eight objects and three questions. The sessions were a random mixture of 10 real games and 10 control games that were structured the same way.*


Participants were able to guess the correct object in 72 percent of the real games, compared with just 18 percent of the control rounds. Incorrect guesses in the real games could be caused by several factors, the most likely being uncertainty about whether a phosphene had appeared.


The study builds on the UW team’s initial experiment in 2013, which was the first to demonstrate a direct brain-to-brain connection between humans. Other scientists have connected the brains of rats and monkeys, and transmitted brain signals from a human to a rat, using electrodes inserted into animals’ brains. In the 2013 experiment, the UW team used noninvasive technology to send a person’s brain signals over the Internet to control the hand motions of another person.


The experiment evolved out of research by co-author Rajesh Rao, a UW professor of computer science and engineering, on brain-computer interfaces that enable people to activate devices with their minds. In 2011, Rao began collaborating with Stocco and Prat to determine how to link two human brains together.


In 2014, the researchers received a $1 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation that allowed them to broaden their experiments to decode more complex interactions and brain processes. They are now exploring the possibility of “brain tutoring,” transferring signals directly from healthy brains to ones that are developmentally impaired or impacted by external factors such as a stroke or accident, or simply to transfer knowledge from teacher to pupil. The team is also working on transmitting brain states — for example, sending signals from an alert person to a sleepy one, or from a focused student to one who has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD.


“Imagine having someone with ADHD and a neurotypical student,” Prat said. “When the non-ADHD student is paying attention, the ADHD student’s brain gets put into a state of greater attention automatically.”


“Evolution has spent a colossal amount of time to find ways for us and other animals to take information out of our brains and communicate it to other animals in the forms of behavior, speech and so on,” Stocco said. “But it requires a translation. We can only communicate part of whatever our brain processes. “What we are doing is kind of reversing the process a step at a time by opening up this box and taking signals from the brain and with minimal translation, putting them back in another person’s brain,” he said.


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Using assessment (tests) to chunk lessons and increase engagement.

Using assessment (tests) to chunk lessons and increase engagement. | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it

Annie Murphy Paul

 

"Szpunar (now an assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago) has demonstrated in a number of studies that “interpolated tests”—quiz questions embedded at intervals throughout a videotaped lecture, to which students are required to respond—leads students to better maintain their attention and to take more comprehensive notes, leaving them with improved understanding and recall of the material.

Szpunar and Scachter’s early studies revealed that the tendency to mind-wander during videotaped lectures was common: when prompted to report what they were thinking about, students admitted to not paying attention to the lecture about 40 percent of the time. The researchers experimented with different ways of maintaining students’ focus, and found that the interpolated quizzes worked best:"


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Mel Riddile's curator insight, September 24, 2015 3:30 PM

"tests are the best way, bar none, to accomplish our educational objectives. This is what I’m getting at when I call this approach affirmative testing: done right, testing could represent not a negative influence on our schools, nor even a necessary evil, but an affirmatively positive force for student learning and growth."

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What does real and authentic engagement look like for students?

What does real and authentic engagement look like for students? | DEEPER Instruction, DEEPER understanding, DEEPER knowledge | Scoop.it

By Getting Smart Staff - Human beings engage in a task for many different reasons. Here are 26 instincts that motivate a commitment of time and energy.


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Betty Skeet's curator insight, September 27, 2015 3:36 AM

What can move people to engage?