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AnnuRevPlantBiol (2011) Evolution of Photosynthesis

AnnuRevPlantBiol (2011) Evolution of Photosynthesis | javierar | Scoop.it

Students sometimes struggle with all the biochemical complexity involved in photosynthesis, and don't always grasp the overarching themes. This terrific article by Hohmann-Marriott and Blankenship beautifully assembles lots of information into a coherent structure.

 

"Understanding the evolutionary constraints imposed on bioenergetic systems is not only an intellectual pursuit but may be a key to unlock our energy future."


Via Mary Williams, antonia castagnola
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Mary Williams's comment, February 19, 2013 8:33 AM
How to live on light and air!
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The best of two worlds: Solar hydrogen production breakthrough

The best of two worlds: Solar hydrogen production breakthrough | javierar | Scoop.it

Using a simple solar cell and a photo anode made of a metal oxide, HZB and TU Delft scientists have successfully stored nearly five percent of solar energy chemically in the form of hydrogen. This is a major feat as the design of the solar cell is much simpler than that of the high-efficiency triple-junction cells based on amorphous silicon or expensive III-V semiconductors that are traditionally used for this purpose.

The photo anode, which is made from the metal oxide bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) to which a small amount of tungsten atoms was added, was sprayed onto a piece of conducting glass and coated with an inexpensive cobalt phosphate catalyst. "Basically, we combined the best of both worlds," explains Prof. Dr. Roel van de Krol, head of the HZB Institute for Solar Fuels: "We start with a chemically stable, low cost metal oxide, add a really good but simple silicon-based thin film solar cell, and – voilà – we've just created a cost-effective, highly stable, and highly efficient solar fuel device."

Thus the experts were able to develop a rather elegant and simple system for using sunlight to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. This process, called artificial photosynthesis, allows solar energy to be stored in the form of hydrogen. The hydrogen can then be used as a fuel either directly or in the form of methane, or it can generate electricity in a fuel cell. One rough estimate shows the potential inherent in this technology: At a solar performance in Germany of roughly 600 Watts per square meter, 100 square meters of this type of system is theoretically capable of storing 3 kilowatt hours of energy in the form of hydrogen in just one single hour of sunshine. This energy could then be available at night or on cloudy days.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, antonia castagnola
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3.5 billion years ago, meteorites provided reactive phosphorus essential for creating the earliest life on Earth

3.5 billion years ago, meteorites provided reactive phosphorus essential for creating the earliest life on Earth | javierar | Scoop.it

Most astrobiologists believe that life in some form is likely to exist away from Earth. But new research demonstrates that life as we know it on Earth might never have come to exist at all if not for a key element delivered to the planet by meteorites billions of years ago.

 

Scientists at the University of Washington and the University of South Florida found that during the Hadean and Archean eons – the first two of the four principal eons of the Earth’s earliest history – the heavy bombardment by meteorites provided reactive phosphorus essential for creating the earliest life on Earth.

 

When released in water, that reactive phosphorus could be incorporated into prebiotic molecules, and the researchers documented its presence in early Archean limestone, showing it was abundant some 3.5 billion years ago.

 

“The importance of this finding is that it provides the missing ingredient in the origin-of-life recipe: a form of phosphorus that can be readily incorporated into essential biological molecules like nucleic acids and cell-membrane lipids,” said Roger Buick, a UW professor of Earth and space sciences.

 

The scientists concluded that the meteorites delivered phosphorus in minerals that are not now seen on the surface of the Earth, and these minerals corroded in water to release phosphite, a form of phosphorus seen only on the early Earth.

 

“Meteorite phosphorus may have been a fuel that provided the energy and phosphorus necessary for the onset of life,” said Pasek. “If this meteoritic phosphorus is added to simple organic compounds, it can generate phosphorus biomolecules identical to those seen in life today.”

 

He said the research provides a plausible answer for why we don’t see new life forms on Earth today: The conditions under which life arose billions of years ago are no longer present.

 

“The present research shows that this is indeed the case: Phosphorus chemistry on the early Earth was substantially different billions of years ago than it is today,” he said.

 

The findings are based on examination of samples from Australia, Zimbabwe, West Virginia, Wyoming and Florida. The presence of phosphite was detected only in the oldest samples, from surface materials and drill cores from the early Archean in Australia.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Xuan Phan's curator insight, August 15, 2014 9:27 PM

This is an interesting news!

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Anatomy of the Plant Cell vs a Human Cell | Interactive Biology, by Leslie Samuel

Anatomy of the Plant Cell vs a Human Cell | Interactive Biology, by Leslie Samuel | javierar | Scoop.it
This week, I would like to take a break from human anatomy and move on to something different: plant cell anatomy. I know botany is not everyone’s cup of tea; I am included in that category.

Via Jon Freer, Florencia Leyton
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CineversityTV's curator insight, January 29, 2013 5:15 AM

Remember biology at school, get educated on photosynthesis.

Nicole's curator insight, November 10, 2013 11:24 PM

What do you find most interesting about the plant cell?

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Khan Academy- Photosynthesis

Khan Academy- Photosynthesis | javierar | Scoop.it

Very good and thorough lectures on photosynthesis


Via Jon Freer, Florencia Leyton
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ESA's prototype ExoMars rover completes testing in Chile | GizMag.com

ESA's prototype ExoMars rover completes testing in Chile | GizMag.com | javierar | Scoop.it

ESA’s Sample Acquisition Field Experiment with a Rover (SAFER) has completed six “Martian days” of tests roaming Chile’s Atacama Desert. Nicknamed "Bridget," the prototype of the space agency’s ExoMars rover is part of a program to gain experience in building and operating planetary rovers in anticipation of the 2018 ESA Mars mission.

 

Bridget was built by Astrium in Stevenage, UK, and designed using ExoMars as a reference mission. It was equipped with three prototype instruments for exploring the Atacama, which is the driest, most lifeless spot on Earth, and an analog for the harsh Martian environment.

 

The instrument package consisted of a panoramic camera, a close-up imager, and a ground-penetrating radar. The final ExoMars rover will also include a robotic drill for collecting soil samples, which Bridget lacks, so this was simulated by a support team falling back on a pick and shovel. This was done not only to collect soil samples for Bridget to study, but also to corroborate the findings of the ground radar.

 

Though a ground crew was on hand, the test itself was controlled from the Remote Control Centre (RCC) at the Satellite Applications Catapult facility in Harwell, UK, where scientists and engineers followed the rover using a large video wall that displayed data from the rover mixed with 3D maps that were made using a UAV to simulate images taken from an orbiter. The idea was to create conditions where the RCC has to rely on data similar to what would come back from a real Mars mission. This was taken to the point of the ground crew using a broom to remove their footprints, so they couldn't be used as navigational clues by mission control.

 

Click headline to read more, view pix and watch video clip--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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The Forgotten Cold War Plan That Put a Ring of Copper Around the Earth | Wired Science

The Forgotten Cold War Plan That Put a Ring of Copper Around the Earth | Wired Science | javierar | Scoop.it

During the summer of 1963, Earth looked a tiny bit like Saturn.

The same year that Martin Luther King, Jr. marched on Washington and Beatlemania was born, the United States launched half a billion whisker-thin copper wires into orbit in an attempt to install a ring around the Earth. It was called Project West Ford, and it’s a perfect, if odd, example of the Cold War paranoia and military mentality at work in America’s early space program.

 

The Air Force and Department of Defense envisioned the West Ford ring as the largest radio antenna in human history. Its goal was to protect the nation’s long-range communications in the event of an attack from the increasingly belligerent Soviet Union.

 

During the late 1950’s, long-range communications relied on undersea cables or over-the-horizon radio. These were robust, but not invulnerable. Should the Soviets have attacked an undersea telephone or telegraph cable, America would only have been able to rely on radio broadcasts to communicate overseas. But the fidelity of the ionosphere, the layer of the atmosphere that makes most long-range radio broadcasts possible, is at the mercy of the sun: It is routinely disrupted by solar storms. The U.S. military had identified a problem.

 

A potential solution was born in 1958 at MIT’s Lincoln Labs, a research station on Hanscom Air Force Base northwest of Boston. Project Needles, as it was originally known, was Walter E. Morrow’s idea. He suggested that if Earth possessed a permanent radio reflector in the form of an orbiting ring of copper threads, America’s long-range communications would be immune from solar disturbances and out of reach of nefarious Soviet plots.

 

Each copper wire was about 1.8 centimeters in length. This was half the wavelength of the 8 GHz transmission signal beamed from Earth, effectively turning each filament into what is known as a dipole antenna. The antennas would boost long-range radio broadcasts without depending on the fickle ionosphere.

 

Today it’s hard to imagine a time where filling space with millions of tiny metal projectiles was considered a good idea. But West Ford was spawned before men had set foot in space, when generals were in charge of NASA’s rockets, and most satellites and spacecraft hadn’t flown beyond the drafting table. The agency operated under a “Big Sky Theory.” Surely space is so big that the risks of anything crashing into a stray bit of space junk were miniscule compared to the threat of communism.

 

The project was renamed West Ford, for the neighboring town of Westford, Massachusetts. It wasn’t the first, or even the strangest plan to build a global radio reflector. In 1945, science fiction author Arthur C. Clarke suggested that Germany’s V2 rocket arsenal could be repurposed to deploy an array of antennas into geostationary orbit around the Earth. So prescient was Clarke’s vision, today’s communications satellites, residing at these fixed points above the planet, are said to reside in “Clarke Orbit”.

 

Meanwhile, American scientists had been attempting to use our own moon as a communications relay, a feat that would finally be accomplished with 1946’s Project Diana. An even more audacious scheme was hatched in the early 1960s from a shiny Mylar egg known as Project Echo, which utilized a pair of microwave reflectors in the form of space-borne metallic balloons.

 

As Project West Ford progressed through development, radio astronomers raised alarm at the ill effects this cloud of metal could have on their ability to survey the stars. Concerns were beginning to arise about the problem of space junk. But beneath these worries was an undercurrent of frustration that a space mission under the banner of national security was not subject to the same transparency as public efforts.

 

The Space Science Board of the National Academy of Sciences convened a series of classified discussions to address astronomers’ worries, and President Kennedy attempted a compromise in 1961. The White House ensured that West Ford’s needles would be placed in a low orbit, the wires would likely re-enter Earth’s atmosphere within two years, and no further tests would be conducted until the results of the first were fully evaluated. This partially appeased the international astronomy community, but still, no one could guarantee precisely what would happen to twenty kilograms of copper wire dispersed into orbit.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Photosynthesis

Paul Andersen explains the process of photosynthesis by which plants and algae can convert carbon dioxide into useable sugar. He begins with a brief descript...

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Google Quantum AI brings quantum physics to Minecraft

Google Quantum AI brings quantum physics to Minecraft | javierar | Scoop.it
Google's Quantum AI Lab collaborates with educators and physicists to bring simulated quantum physics into the blocky world of Minecraft. Read this article by Michelle Starr on CNET.
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PLOS Biology: Collection Overview: Ten Years of Wonderful Open Access Science

PLOS Biology: Collection Overview: Ten Years of Wonderful Open Access Science | javierar | Scoop.it

To mark our tenth Anniversary at PLOS Biology, we are launching a special, celebratory Tenth Anniversary PLOS Biology Collection which showcases 10 specially selected PLOS Biology research articles drawn from a decade of publishing excellent science. It also features newly commissioned articles, including thought-provoking pieces on the Open Access movement (past and present), on article-level metrics, and on the history of the Public Library of Science. Each research article highlighted in the collection is also accompanied by a PLOS Biologue blog post to extend the impact of these remarkable studies to the widest possible audience.

 

Roberts RG, Alfred J (2013) Collection Overview: Ten Years of Wonderful Open Access Science. PLoS Biol 11(10): e1001688. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001688


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Origin of photosynthesis revealed: Genome analysis of 'living fossil' sheds light on the evolution of plants

Origin of photosynthesis revealed: Genome analysis of 'living fossil' sheds light on the evolution of plants | javierar | Scoop.it
Evolutionary biologists have shed light on the early events leading to photosynthesis, the result of the sequencing of 70 million base pair nuclear genome of the one-celled alga Cyanophora.

Via Sakis Koukouvis, antonia castagnola
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Charlie Mijatovic's curator insight, September 30, 2014 8:07 AM

Very interesting article regarding the beginningsof photosynthesis

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Carbon Capture And Storage: One Step Forward, One Step Back

Carbon Capture And Storage: One Step Forward, One Step Back | javierar | Scoop.it
A new survey finds a sharp drop in large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects.

Via Alexandre Pépin
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Alexandre Pépin's curator insight, October 18, 2013 6:48 AM

Yet another analyis of Global CCS institute "global Status 2013"

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ESSAY: Ecology Is the Meaning of Life: Embracing A Sense of "Enoughness"

ESSAY: Ecology Is the Meaning of Life: Embracing A Sense of "Enoughness" | javierar | Scoop.it
EcoEarth.Info is a portal and search engine that promotes environmental sustainability public policy; including climate, forests, water and oceans.

 

Dr. Glen Barry, Ocober 20, 2013

The natural Earth is a marvel – a complex coupling of species within ecosystems, whereby life begets life.

Ecology is far more than the study of life and its environment. The word is used here as a synonym for ecosystems – the vibrant connections that emerge between species across scales, which cumulatively make life on Earth possible.

Nature is far, far more than pretty plants and animals. Ecosystems make Earth habitable, providing water, food, air, shelter, and more – everything that we need and desire to live well. In naturally evolved ecosystems, from genes to individual organisms and species, to ecosystems and everything else in between, each living being present fulfills a niche which sustains itself, its neighbors, and the whole.

All species uniquely express evolutionary brilliance and have a purpose, a reason for being, a right to exist, and are necessary to maintain life’s full potential. From the lowly worm to soaring eagles, to the human race – all naturally evolved life has value and relies upon all the rest. Even seemingly noxious disease organisms and man-eating predators have a role to play in maintaining ecological balance.

Humankind’s demand for resources and growth overwhelms nature, our steady diminishment of ecosystems abruptly changes climate, and this is collapsing the biosphere. Global ecosystems – water, air, food, forests, oceans, wetlands, and more – are collapsing and dying under the burden of human industrial and population growth.... http://www.ecoearth.info/blog/2013/10/essay_ecology_is_the_meaning_o.asp

 

 ▶  WHY CHOOSING NATURE WILL ONLY ADVANCE HUMAN SOCIETIES http://sco.lt/6odAoL

 

▶  WEB-OF-LIFE UNRAVELLING - HEALTHY ECOSYSTEMS VITAL FOR ALL PLANETARY LIFE http://sco.lt/8idD7J

 

▶  WHY THE ECONOMY NEEDS NATURE http://sco.lt/6WP6On

 

▶  ECO-SPIRITUALITY: TOWARDS A VALUES-BASED ECONOMIC STRUCTURE http://sco.lt/7tcgQj

 

                                                  VIDEO

▶  "ENOUGHNESS: RESTORING BALANCE TO THE ECONOMY  http://sco.lt/55TwvJ

 

 

Treehugger, October 21, 2013
▶ CAN TRANSITION TOWNS HELP CREATE A NEW ECONOMY http://www.treehugger.com/economics/transition-towns-new-economy.html

▶ VIDEO http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKN3RLkEGfM#t=106

 

▶  THE NEW COOPERATIVE WAY TO A FLOURISHING FUTURE: SELF-SUFFICIENT COMMUNITIES - AN ALTERNATIVE TO CAPITALISM  http://sco.lt/80kwjZ

 

THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY: COULD IT PRESENT A NEW WAY OF DOING BUSINESS?  http://sco.lt/6VI4aP

 

THE CRISIS OF CIVILISATION IS AN UNPRECEDENTED OPPORTUNITY:  BUSINESS-AS-USUAL IS NOT SUSTAINABLE http://sco.lt/8wpytt

 

                                                      WATCH

                                 "THE STORY OF SOLUTIONS"

                      Latest from Annie Leonard's "Story of Stuff"

                                 Resolving the "Game of More"

                   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cpkRvc-sOKk

 

 

 

 

 February 20, 2013 Guardian Sustainable Business

THICH NHAT HANH:

▶  BEYOND ENVIRONMENT: FALLING BACK IN LOVE WITH MOTHER EARTH http://www.guardian.co.uk/sustainable-business/zen-thich-naht-hanh-buddhidm-business-values?intcmp=239

 

                                                 VIDEO

September 5, 2013 Treehugger
▶  UNTIL WE GRIEVE, WE'LL NEVER PROTECT THE EARTH

We'll protect what we fall in love with, that's the premise behind this video on the stunning beauty of pollination.

http://www.treehugger.com/endangered-species/until-we-grieve-well-never-protect-earth.html

 

 26 August 2010 Guardian - Living Our Values

THICH NHAT HAHN: 

▶  ZEN AND THE ART OF PROTECTING THE PLANET: In Rare Interview with zen buddhist master Thay warns of the threat to civilisation from climate change and the spiritual revival that is needed to avert catastrophe http://www.theguardian.com/sustainability/environment-zen-buddhism-sustainability

 

Jan 21, 2013 Guardian Sustainable Business

THICH NHAT HANH: 

▶  ONLY LOVE CAN SAVE US FROM CLIMATE CHANGE

Leading spiritual teacher Thay suggests that our search for fame, wealth, power and sexual gratification provides the perfect refuge for people to hide from the truth about the many challenges facing the world. Worse still, our addiction to material goods and a hectic lifestyle provides only a temporary plaster for gaping emotional and spiritual wounds, which only drives greater loneliness and unhappiness..... http://www.guardian.co.uk/sustainable-business/zen-master-thich-nhat-hanh-love-climate-change

 

March 23, 3012 -  The Ecologist

THICH NHAT HANH

▶  MAYBE IN 100 YEARS THERE WILL BE NO MORE HUMANS ON THE PLANET   http://www.scoop.it/t/environmental-and-human-health/p/1474669518/thich-nhat-hanh-maybe-in-100-years-there-will-be-no-more-humans-on-the-planet-the-ecologist

 

 

 

▶  BLOG -----AN URGENT MEMO TO THE WORLD http://ow.ly/n97Vf

 

▶ENOUGHNESS : WESTERN THOUGHT vs INDIGENOUS PHILOSOPHY http://sco.lt/6EFbPt

 

 

SEE:

▶▶ Biodiversity IS Life  – #Conservation #Ecosystems #Wildlife #Rivers #Forests #Environment by @pdjmoo  http://sco.lt/8D8NuL

 

▶▶ OUR OCEANS NEED US by @pdjmoo  http://sco.lt/6wow1R

 

▶▶ CLIMATE CHANGE WILL IMPACT US ALL by @pdjmoo http://sco.lt/7Myakz

 

 

                                                     WATCH

                                         ▶  FILM: ***"HOME"

                    An Exquisite Dedication To the Stewards of Our Planet

      http://thenaturaleye.wordpress.com/2011/03/26/home-an-exquisite-story-of-our-world/

 

 


Via pdjmoo, SustainOurEarth
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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 23, 2013 9:07 PM

This is beyond so many people's comprehension.

pdjmoo's curator insight, October 5, 2014 3:57 AM

                                   FOLLOW MY SCOOPITs


▶  BIODIVERSITY IS LIFE http://www.scoop.it/t/biodiversity-is-life


▶  OUR OCEANS NEED US http://www.scoop.it/t/our-oceans-need-us


 ▶ CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY http://www.scoop.it/t/environmental-and-human-health


▶  CLIMATE CHANGE WILL IMPACT US ALL http://www.scoop.it/t/changingplanet


▶   OUR FOOD, OUR HEALTH http://www.scoop.it/t/agriculture-gmos-pesticides

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Photosynthesis and Respiration

013 - Free Energy Capture and Storage Paul Andersen details the processes of photosynthesis and respiration in this video on free energy capture and storage....

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New light shone on photosynthesis

New light shone on photosynthesis | javierar | Scoop.it

Photosynthesis is one of the fundamental processes of life on Earth. The evolutionary transition from anoxygenic (no oxygen produced) to oxygenic (oxygen-producing) photosynthesis resulted in the critical development of atmospheric oxygen. One of the outstanding questions of the early Earth is how ancient organisms made this transition. Ferns are believed to have played a key role in the process.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Florencia Leyton
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NSA/GCHQ – The New Praetorians and the New Cold War

NSA/GCHQ – The New Praetorians and the New Cold War | javierar | Scoop.it
Author of THE DEBT GENERATION

 

In a democracy rule is by consent. In a dictatorship it is by control.

Which do we have in the West? It seems to me, it is no longer clear. We certainly still have the rituals of rule by consent. But behind the elected front men and women is a shadow state. It’s people ritually swear allegiance to those we elect. They declare themselves there to serve and protect. But when it is us they spend their time spying on, whose interests are they protecting? Can you really serve those you do not trust?

 

In 2008 we discovered that behind the banking system we knew about, there was a vast shadow banking system whose size most of us never suspected. In 2013 we have glimpsed not only the scale of the shadow state but the degree to which it, like the shadown banking system, is out of control and not working for us at all.

 

Of course Mr Obama and the ‘security chiefs’, brought blinking into the unwelcome light,  justify themselves by telling us that all those things they never saw fit to mention to us, or even to the people we spend so much time electing, have been saving us from un-named terrors. Are we to take such unverifiable assurances at face value from people who we know do not trust us and who make a profession of lying to us?  I remember when Treasury Secretary Paulson told the US Congress that unless they stopped asking questions and simply handed him $600 billion  to bail out the shadow banking system, there would be anarchy and tanks on the streets. Am I wrong ...


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Hal's curator insight, July 3, 2013 11:48 AM

Click through for the rest of the post. 

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Targeted DNA demethylation and activation of endogenous genes using programmable TALE-TET1 fusion proteins - Nature Biotech.

Targeted DNA demethylation and activation of endogenous genes using programmable TALE-TET1 fusion proteins - Nature Biotech. | javierar | Scoop.it

(via T. Lahaye, thx!)

Maeder et al, 2013

Here we describe an approach for efficient targeted demethylation of specific CpGs in human cells using fusions of engineered transcription activator–like effector (TALE) repeat arrays and the TET1 hydroxylase catalytic domain. Using these TALE-TET1 fusions, we demonstrate that modification of critical methylated promoter CpG positions can lead to substantial increases in the expression of endogenous human genes. Our results delineate a strategy for understanding the functional significance of specific CpG methylation marks in the context of endogenous gene loci and validate programmable DNA demethylation reagents with potential utility for research and therapeutic applications.


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Biology4Kids.com: Plants: Photosynthesis

Biology4Kids.com: Plants: Photosynthesis | javierar | Scoop.it
Biology4Kids.com! The web site that teaches the basics of biology and life science to everyone!

Via Saeeda Smiadak
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Top 10 Social Studies Pinterest Boards

Top 10 Social Studies Pinterest Boards | javierar | Scoop.it
Yes. I know. There are other social media bookmarking sites out there. There are other bookmarking sites out there that I personally like more. And there may even be other bookmarking sites that ar...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Nature: Photosynthetic entrainment of the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock

Nature: Photosynthetic entrainment of the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock | javierar | Scoop.it
Circadian clocks provide a competitive advantage in an environment that is heavily influenced by the rotation of the Earth, by driving daily rhythms in behaviour, physiology and metabolism in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals.

Via Mary Williams
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