JavaScript for Line of Business Applications
555.7K views | +96 today
Follow
JavaScript for Line of Business Applications
Keeping track of current JavaScript Frameworks that help design your clientside Business Logic Layers.
Curated by Jan Hesse
Beam to my Inbox:
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scoop.it!

Rollup: How we use React.js and npm to share UI code at AdRoll

Rollup: How we use React.js and npm to share UI code at AdRoll | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

This is the second in a series of three blog posts about Rollup, AdRoll's UI component library. This post covers how we build individual components and the developer tools supporting them.

All the shared UI components we use at AdRoll live in a private GitHub repository called Rollup. In the repo, each component has its own directory whose name matches the component’s npm package name. All components, and by extension Rollup npm package names, are prefixed with ar- for AdRoll.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Zero-Downtime JavaScript App Deployment

Deploying your Ember application can be tricky, and slow if it is tied into your backend, Feifan Wang talks tools and strategies for lean JavaScript app deployment in the context of Rails and Ember.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Static Site Generation with React and Webpack

Static Site Generation with React and Webpack | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

React is incredibly intuitive and flexible to work with, but relying solely on client side rendering leaves a lot to be desired in regards to percieved performance. With a static React site, the page loads just like any other static HTML, and the JavaScript kicks in whenever it’s downloaded. This is extremely helpful for combining documentation with interactive demonstrations, like Colorable or Building SVG Icons with React. Using React with webpack also allows you to consolidate the entire build process in Node and take advantage of anything in the npm ecosystem. Last but not least, React is just fun to use.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Grunt and Gulp: Task Runners in Asp.Net 5

Grunt and Gulp: Task Runners in Asp.Net 5 | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

What’s the difference between Gulp and Grunt? While Gulp is a later entry to the field, it has gained popularity for crisp performance and elegant syntax. Unlike Grunt, which tends to read and write files to disk, Gulp uses a stream (Vinyl) object to pipe method results to following methods, allowing calls to be chained together in a fluent syntax. Grunt is an earlier entry in the client-build-tool space. Grunt modules predefine most everyday tasks like linting, minimizing, and unit testing, and Grunt is widely adopted and downloaded thousands of times each day.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Faster Mobile Websites

As mobile device usage continues to grow, developers need to ensure that their mobile websites are fast and offer a high quality experience for all users. A fast mobile website can be the difference between winning or losing a customer. A few seconds delay in your page load time and you might find that users to your site easily become frustrated and navigate away to another site...or even worse, your competitors site!

Developers understand the need for fast, smooth websites - but how do you apply this to a mobile website and the vast amount of mobile devices out there? This talk is aimed at all developers that build websites and will dive into basic and advanced web performance techniques - there is something for everyone! The talk also covers free tools that developers can use to test and profile the performance of their mobile websites.

This talk will cover a variety of performance related issues specifically aimed at mobile websites and the techniques that developers can use to overcome them and will include:

- Mobile Network Overhead
- Critical Path Rendering
- Basic web performance techniques
- Responsive images
- Performance build automation
- Mobile Website profiling and debugging tools
- A step by step website optimization

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Craft Conference

Craft Conference | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it
CRAFT is about software craftsmanship, which tools, methods, practices should be part of the toolbox of a modern developer and company, and it is a compass on new technologies, trends. You can learn from the best speakers and practitioners in our community.
more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Broccoli: The Build Tool, Not the Vegetable

Broccoli: The Build Tool, Not the Vegetable | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

Broccoli is the blazingly fast build tool used by Ember.js and Ember CLI. Though as we'll see it has uses in any JavaScript project and maybe beyond that.
If you have created an Ember CLI application you are probably using Broccoli very minimally. Your app is initialized with a Brocfile.js that looks something like this...

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Writing client-side ES6 with webpack

Writing client-side ES6 with webpack | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

Notable webpack features include:

  • Supported module formats: AMD, CommonJS
    • Via loader (plug-in): ES6
  • Supported package managers: Bower, npm
  • Loaders for non-code: CSS, templates, …
  • On-demand loading (chunked transfer)
  • Built-in development server
more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Gulp is awesome, but do we really need it?

Gulp is awesome, but do we really need it? | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it
I've been using Grunt and Gulp for some time now. However, I've realized lately that with a simple package.json I can do the same, but more manteinable and with less code. In this post, I'll explain how we can do it!!
more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Make and Browserify

Make and Browserify | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

Make is over 30 years old and a standard tool on unix-ey systems (e.g. Linux and OSX). You probably already have it installed on your machine. While it is ubiquitous for C builds, it is flexible enough that you can use it to automate just about anything build-related.

I have been a strong proponent of Grunt for the past few years, but I feel like it is too complicated for what it does. I had found myself fighting with it a bit, especially when I needed to define a complicated sequence of processing steps with intermediate artifacts.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Tips and Tricks for Faster Front-End Builds

Tips and Tricks for Faster Front-End Builds | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

As a reduced test case for experimentation, I set up a sample repository. The project uses jQuery, Lo-dash, and Handlebars, along with 50-or-so custom CommonJS modules (bundling to half a megabyte) to give Browserify something to work with.

In this repository, our ideal build system will do the following (doubly ideal would be doing these things quickly... we'll get there).

  • Preprocess, prefix, and minify CSS
  • Lint/Hint, Browserify, and Uglify our JavaScript
  • Watch for changes and re-run any appropriate steps

Our build process at Pellucid has a few more requirements than this, but these should cover some of the longest operations, and this sample project should be generic enough to apply to many front-end projects.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Integrating QUnit with Travis builds

Integrating QUnit with Travis builds | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

Under normal circumstances, following the official guide for setting up QUnit would have been enough, but there were a couple of issues we had to overcome:

  1. We’re using the AMD format for our JavaScript modules.
  2. We want our tests to run automatically as part of our Travis builds.
more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Integrating Javascript unit tests with Visual Studio build

Integrating Javascript unit tests with Visual Studio build | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

The first step was getting hold of QUnit, a Javascript unit test suite capable of executing our tests; in fact, QUnit is apparently used to unit test not only itself, but also JQueryUI, JQuery and JQuery mobile.

So that’s all great and groovy, but requires a manual step of launching the document in a browser in order to execute the javascript.

Enter Chutzpah, a command-line javascript test runner. It uses PhantomJS to execute javascript in a headless (read:no window) Webkit browser and also allows us to execute it from the command line.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

SurviveJS - Webpack and React

SurviveJS - Webpack and React | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it
Want to learn Webpack or React? Get started for free and build a Kanban board by following the example project.

SurviveJS - Webpack and React shows you how to build a simple Kanban application based on these technologies. During the process you will learn to:

  1. Set up a Webpack based development and production environment. You will learn to get most out of react-hot-loader and Babel for development.
  2. Improve the quality of your code by using ESLint and friends to spot possible mistakes earlier.
  3. Get into the React mindset while learning the basics of Alt, an implementation of Flux Application Architecture.
  4. Style your React application in various emerging ways.
  5. Implement drag and drop for your application using React DnD.
more...
Arik Grinstein's curator insight, September 10, 2015 4:43 AM

A lot of good stuff in this one

Scoop.it!

The Hitchhiker's Guide to Modern JavaScript Tooling

The Hitchhiker's Guide to Modern JavaScript Tooling | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

A lot of developers coming to JavaScript world attracted by React.js are confused with the tooling used to produce modern JavaScript code. Webpack, Babel, ESLint, Mocha, Karma, Grunt... what should I use and which tool is doing what?

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

WebPack For Visual Studio Developers -

WebPack For Visual Studio Developers - | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it
Burke Holland explains how the WebPack module loader let's you load any asset - CommonJS or AMD, JavaScript or CSS - and how to use it with Visual Studio.

WebPack calls itself a “Module Bundler”. We tend to think of modules in terms of JavaScript, but WebPack thinks of them in terms of any assets that you might want to transpile, minify and pipe to the browser. JavaScript, TypeScript, CoffeeScript, CSS, SASS, images – it doesn’t matter to WebPack. But this is not the reason why I love it. The reason why WebPack is my tool of choice, is that it bridges the gap between AMD and CommonJS.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

A cookbook for using Webpack with React JS

A cookbook for using Webpack with React JS | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

Recipes for solving common Webpack problems.

The purpose of this cookbook is to guide you into the world of React and Webpack. Both are powerful technologies and when used together, frontend development becomes a joy.

The cookbook should have something to offer for all skill levels. If you are interested in just React, skip the Webpack part and vice versa.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Setup Webpack on an ES6 React app with SASS

Setup Webpack on an ES6 React app with SASS | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it
Webpack is really a great JavaScript bundler, allowing to turn messy and numerous JavaScript into a single minified and optimized script. Yet, we missed a good getting started tutorial. Here is one...
more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

How to Minify an Ionic Application for Production

How to Minify an Ionic Application for Production | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

Minifying code is essentially the process of stripping away everything unnecessary: everything is condensed onto a single line, files are concatenated together, variables are renamed to be shorter and so on. There’s two main reasons you might want to do this:

  1. To reduce the file size of your resulting application and increase performance
  2. Obfuscate your code so that prying eyes can’t obtain your source code (something which is quite possible in PhoneGap applications)

Ionic has no automated process to do this but it’s relatively simple to set up your own process using Gulpand Grunt. A lot of this is based off of this tutorial by Agustin Haller which was tremendously helpful to me. The only problem I had with it though is that it relies on cordova hooks, and if you’re using PhoneGap Build to build your application then you won’t be able to use these.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

A Baseline for Front-End [JS] Developers: 2015

A Baseline for Front-End [JS] Developers: 2015 | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

It’s been almost three years since I wrote A Baseline for Front-End Developers, probably my most popular post ever.

It’s 2015. I want to write an update, but as I sit down to do just that, I realize a couple of things. One, it’s arguably not fair to call this stuff a “baseline” – if you thought that about the original post, you’ll find it doubly true for this one. One could argue we should consider the good-enough-to-get-a-job skills to be the “baseline.” But there are a whole lot of front-end jobs to choose from, and getting one doesn’t establish much of a baseline. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Backend Apps with Webpack: Part I

Backend Apps with Webpack: Part I | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

Webpack is an amazing tool. It calls itself a "module bundler" but it is much more than that: it provides an infrastructure for building, transforming, and live updating modules. While its wall of configuration options may not be your style, this approach works really well for the problem it's solving.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Taking React to the next level: Mixins, Gulp, and Browserify

Taking React to the next level: Mixins, Gulp, and Browserify | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

I like React. But React can't do everything, and there are things that make no sense to do as a React component, like plain JS functionality. For instance, if you want an image manipulation component, then by all means write it, but you're not going to also include all the code for the under-the-hood image processing library. You want to keep that separate.

What's still missing?

That post didn't cover everything, and hopefully it left some questions on the table, so let's address those: what's still missing?

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

How to use Gulp in Visual Studio

How to use Gulp in Visual Studio | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

First, we need to create a package.json file in the root directory of the your project. Next, we will install a few packages that we will use for this project. Run the following command from the same folder that you added the package.json file.

So far, we have been working primarily in the command line. It would be nice if we could integrate with our existing Visual Studio experience.

Luckily, we can with the new Task Runner Explorer plugin. Once the plugin is installed, open the Task Runner Explorer from the View –> Other Windows –> Task Runner Explorer menu.

This window will show you all the tasks in the gulp file and allow you to bind those tasks to certain Visual Studio events. This way, we don’t need to remember to run the gulp tasks from the command line. The IDE can handle it for us.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Taking Meteor Apps Into Production with Modulus, Compose, and Codeship

Taking Meteor Apps Into Production with Modulus, Compose, and Codeship | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

Exploring continuous integration and scalable hosting for Meteor projects.

I’m going to focus on one setup that has worked well for projects I’ve worked on and that I know other production Meteor apps are using. The setup described here uses ModulusCompose, and Codeship. Leveraging these services has the advantage of keeping deployment and hosting simple, so developers can focus on building their app and spend less time on server configuration and ops work.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Using ReactJS with Browserify and Gulp

Using ReactJS with Browserify and Gulp | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

ReactJS uses a special syntax called JSX, not the normal JS one. Usually, when you want to work with ReactJS JSX files, you need to transform it to a normal JS file and then operate on that file. However, with the help of Reactify, a transform for Browserify, you won’t need to compile jsx to js files anymore, just use it directly from your code.

more...
No comment yet.