JavaScript for Line of Business Applications
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JavaScript for Line of Business Applications
Keeping track of current JavaScript Frameworks that help design your clientside Business Logic Layers.
Curated by Jan Hesse
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Totally Tooling Tips with Addy Osmani & Matt Gaunt - YouTube

Totally Tooling Tips with Addy Osmani & Matt Gaunt - YouTube | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

In 'Totally Tooling Tips' web developers Matt and Addy discuss the latest topics, issues and work arounds for building apps and libraries to help mop up your Totally Tooling Tears.

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Tips for using async functions (ES2017)

Tips for using async functions (ES2017) | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

The foundation of async functions is Promises. That’s why understanding the latter is crucial for understanding the former. Especially when connecting old code that isn’t based on Promises with async functions, you often have no choice but to use Promises directly.

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Async and Await

Async and Await | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

JavaScript, in particular Node.js, has been frequently associated with callback hell. If you've written code that deals with a lot async I/O, you're probably familiar with this pattern:

...

It turns out, this code can be much easier and safer to write.

I'll show you how Promise combined with async / await enables this, but also some of the lessons we've learned from using these new features in production.

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Understanding JavaScript’s async await

Understanding JavaScript’s async await | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it
Earlier this week we took a look at new features coming in ES2016. Today we’ll learn about async / await.The async / await feature didn’t make the cut for …
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Concurrently JavaScript

Concurrently JavaScript | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

What is concurrency? How is it different from parallelism? JavaScript is single-threaded on the event loop, so how does its asynchrony fit into the mix?

These are great questions, but sadly, I think most JS developers are not really asking them enough. The concepts behind writing concurrent code are incredibly important, but we tend to only focus on the API provided to us by some library or framework. These APIs have a tremendous capability to shape our thoughts about the underlying functionalities, and often not in accurate or productive ways.

I want us to talk first about the concepts around concurrency before we focus on what we can do with some API or pattern. Don’t worry: following parts of this blog post series will talk more about APIs, if that’s what really gets you excited. But don’t skip over these concepts.

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Typed Arrays in ECMAScript 6

Typed Arrays in ECMAScript 6 | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

Typed Arrays are an ECMAScript 6 API for handling binary data. This blog post explains how they work.

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Arik Grinstein's curator insight, September 11, 2015 4:26 AM

Types in javascript. Where is the world coming to ??? :)

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Exploring ES6: Upgrade to the next version of JavaScript

Exploring ES6: Upgrade to the next version of JavaScript | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

Exploring ES6 …
Contains reliable and in-depth information on ECMAScript 6, the next version of JavaScript.
Is a book for people who already know JavaScript.
If you are a programmer and want to learn JavaScript (up to and including ECMAScript 5), check out Axel’s book “Speaking JavaScript” (free online).

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Replacing callbacks with ES6 Generators

Replacing callbacks with ES6 Generators | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

By Matt Baker There are a lot of articles out there discussing the use of ES6 generators to remove the “callback pyramid” we so often encounter in JavaScript. Unfortunately, most of them rely on libraries, and few tell the whole story.

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Choose ES6 modules Today!

Choose ES6 modules Today! | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it
Cody Lindley explains why you should ditch non-standard JavaScript module formats and move to the ECMAScript 6 module format with examples.

By using jspm.io you can make use of the official JavaScript module control system (and its syntax) today – all while not having to wait for older modules to be re-written or having to limit yourself to one particular module format or package manager. In other words, you shouldn’t have to care from where a package comes and in what format it’s being provided.

The ideal, and yes we have arrived, is to just use ES6 modules and let a tool like jspm.io sort out all of the ugly details as it pertains to non-es6 modules from multiple endpoints. Not to mention, by using jspm (and a ES6 transpiler like traceur or Babel) you get most everything that ES6 offers, not just modules. Writing ES6 code in your ES6 modules sounds good, right!

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ES6 In Depth series

ES6 In Depth series | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

Welcome to ES6 In Depth! In this new weekly series, we’ll be exploring ECMAScript 6, the upcoming new edition of the JavaScript language. ES6 contains many new language features that will make JS more powerful and expressive, and we’ll visit them one by one in weeks to come. But before we start in on the details, maybe it’s worth taking a minute to talk about what ES6 is and what you can expect.

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Reduce Your AngularJS Code and Improve its Readability Using ECMAScript 6

Reduce Your AngularJS Code and Improve its Readability Using ECMAScript 6 | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

If you’re reasonably up-to-date with front-end app development then there’s a good chance you’ve heard the buzz flying around about ECMAScript 6.

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ES6 Generators: How do they work?

ES6 Generators: How do they work? | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it
Ever wonder what kind of magic is required to make ES6 generators work in ES5? Today we will find out, and learn a lot about generators along the way.

You might have heard of the importance of writing “non-blocking” javascript. When we do an I/O operation, like make an HTTP request or write to a database, we generally want to use something like callbacks or promises. Performing a “blocking” operation would cause the entire program to freeze, which in most cases is not a viable option. Imagine if all of your users had to sit and wait any time someone else wanted to interact with the system.

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Deploying ECMAScript 6

Deploying ECMAScript 6 | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

This blog post describes the options you have for deploying ECMAScript 6 in current JavaScript environments. It is selective w.r.t. the amount of tools it covers. If you want a comprehensive list of tools, I suggest you look at Addy Osmani’s “ECMAScript 6 Tools”.


Content:

1. Using ECMAScript 6 today
2. Transpilation tools
3. Other useful ES6 tools and libraries
4. ES6 REPLs
5. What ES6 features can be transpiled?


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JavaScript Promises for Dummies

JavaScript Promises for Dummies | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

Javascript Promises are not difficult. However, lots of people find it a little bit hard to understand at the beginning. Therefore, I would like to write down the way I understand promise, in a dummy way.

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Next.js - A minimalistic framework for universal server-rendered React applications

Next.js - A minimalistic framework for universal server-rendered React applications | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

We're very proud to open-source Next.js, a small framework for server-rendered universal JavaScript webapps, built on top of React, Webpack and Babel, which powers this very site!

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Yu PANG's curator insight, November 21, 2016 9:20 AM
Next.js - A minimalistic framework for universal server-rendered React applications
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State of the JavaScript Landscape: A Map for Newcomers

Modern JavaScript development is in constant motion. Build tools that were popular 12 or even six months ago are no longer en vogue. In this article, Bonnie Eisenman gives JavaScript newcomers a map to get started on their JavaScript journey. For more experienced JavaScript developers, Bonnie provides an update on where the community is at and what technologies to use for new projects.
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Interactive guide to server-side rendering with Webpack, React, React Transmit, CSS modules and more

Interactive guide to server-side rendering with Webpack, React, React Transmit, CSS modules and more | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

Step 1: minimal Webpack, Babel and React setup

 

Step 2: trivial server-side rendering with Express

 

Step 3: add styles

 

Step 3a: switch to CSS modules

 

Step 3b: save the day by making webpack to render server-side code

 

Step 4a: asyncronously fetching data

 

Step 4b: use react-transmit to declaratively define data deps

 

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wu.js — Higher order functions for ECMAScript 6 iterators

wu.js — Higher order functions for ECMAScript 6 iterators | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

wu.js provides the higher order functions you've come to love from working with arrays (such as map and filter) as well as ones that may be new to JavaScript developers (such as takeWhile). 

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ES6 Generators in Depth

ES6 Generators in Depth | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

Generators are a new feature in ES6. You declare a generator function which returns generator objects g that can then be iterated using any of Array.from(g)[...g], or for value of g loops. Generator functions allow you to declare a special kind of iterator. These iterators can suspend execution while retaining their context. We already examined iterators in the previous article and how their .next() method is called once at a time to pull values from a sequence.

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The Hitchhiker's Guide to Modern JavaScript Tooling

The Hitchhiker's Guide to Modern JavaScript Tooling | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

A lot of developers coming to JavaScript world attracted by React.js are confused with the tooling used to produce modern JavaScript code. Webpack, Babel, ESLint, Mocha, Karma, Grunt... what should I use and which tool is doing what?

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Setup Webpack on an ES6 React app with SASS

Setup Webpack on an ES6 React app with SASS | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it
Webpack is really a great JavaScript bundler, allowing to turn messy and numerous JavaScript into a single minified and optimized script. Yet, we missed a good getting started tutorial. Here is one...
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Creating your first Angular 2 app: From authentication to calling an API and everything in between

Creating your first Angular 2 app: From authentication to calling an API and everything in between | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

Learn how to create a real world angular 2 app using Pipes, Directives, Components, DI, ES6 and much more! We'll implement from Authentication to calling an API and everything in between.

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An 80/20 Guide to ECMAScript 6 Proxies

An 80/20 Guide to ECMAScript 6 Proxies | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

One feature of the current JavaScript language standard, ECMAScript 5, that hasn't gotten nearly enough attention is the Object.defineProperty() function. This function is what makes modules like mongoose possible. If you've never used Object.defineProperty() before, here's a simple use case: suppose you wanted to be able to increment and decrement a JavaScript date's month property using the ++ and --operators.

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React components with ES6

React components with ES6 | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

Let's talk about the setup first. ES6 is great and after much time reading about it and listening various presentations on it I have decided to roll up my sleeves and give it a go. This has resulted in a great application for a project I was working on and it also served as a good practice to get up and running with ES6. 

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Easing the Transition to ES6

Easing the Transition to ES6 | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

We crafted this post to share our approach to making ES6 support as transparent as possible for our users and our team in three easy steps.

To take advantage of ES6 features in browsers that don't natively support it, we needed to use a transpiler such as Babel (formerly known as 6to5). Babel alone has many features, however for further feature support, we also used the Babel polyfill, which allows support for features such as for..of loopspromises, and symbols.

This means our code is forward-compatible (when most modern browsers support ES6 natively, we'll be able to drop the transpiler). Another great reason for doing this is that it won't break existing code. The transpiler won't change much existing code (in the case of supporting iterators, it needs to change loops). Rather, it will pass most of it through, un-touched. This means that you can keep your existing code and begin writing ES6 right along-side it. Our workflow now involves writing ES6 syntax and upgrading pieces of older code we come across.

In order to support this, we needed automatic/transparent transpiling in three environments:

  • ES6 in development mode
  • ES6 in unit tests
  • ES6 in production


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