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Rescooped by Mike Ball from JavaScript for Line of Business Applications
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AngularJS Virtual Scrolling – part 1

AngularJS Virtual Scrolling – part 1 | Javascript | Scoop.it

AngularJS lets you define your own HTML dialect by adding elements, attributes or behavioural classes. The big win for web developers is the ability to move view logic back into the page and use custom UI elements as they would an <input> or an <ol>. These new elements are called directives, but AngularJS also includes interpolation and filters for templating.

One of the more interesting directives is the ng-repeat. It’s really the only directive you need to introduce collections (or looping if you think procedurally). But as is usually the case in web development, presenting a lot of data can result in a high overhead.


Via Jan Hesse
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Jan Hesse's curator insight, June 14, 2013 3:10 PM

Want snappy UI when binding to large data set in AngularJS? Bind the subset of data that's actually visible.

Brian Campbell's comment, July 1, 2013 5:29 PM
@Jan Hesse, how does one bind to a subset of the data? I'm seeking to tackle this performance issue now and not having much luck :(
Rescooped by Mike Ball from JavaScript for Line of Business Applications
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AngularJS vs Ember

AngularJS vs Ember | Javascript | Scoop.it

Recently I got together with some local developers to discuss client side MVC frameworks. We ended up discussing many of the differences between AngularJS and Ember.

There is evidence that AngularJS is beating out Ember in terms of developer mind share: there are more Stack Overflow questions dedicated to AngularJS. AngularJS has more stars and forks on Github.

I have a good idea now why AngularJS is gaining momentum: it is simpler. There is a lot less to the framework and as a consequence it’s easier to learn. If I were to rank the amount of tools various client side MVC frameworks give you, Angular seems to exist somewhere near the half way point between Backbone and Ember.


Via Jan Hesse
Mike Ball's insight:

This review seems focused more on how the developer feels rather than real facts

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