Jasper Jones
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Rescooped by Richard Hartzell from Youth Suicide
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Reaching the end of my life | the suicide project - suicide stories

I'm overqualified for low-paying jobs, so that's not an option. I'm very close to being homeless without any prospects of ever getting a job. To make matters worse, my younger brother and sister live with me — so they're going ...
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Richard Hartzell's curator insight, February 21, 2014 2:15 AM

When people come to a time of emotional strife, or severe struggle, sometimes suicidal thoughts find a way to creep into one's thoughts. The question, "is suicide an option?" Is often thought of as crazy to people with an optimistic state of mind.  But to some it seems like the only viable option.  The negative stigma that goes along with mental illness, is often times the reason people feel ashamed or just can't find a way to reach out for help. Laura had her own motives for why she thought suicide was "option" to take.  If people were to give these lost souls another reason to live, then maybe lives can be saved and changed for the better.

Zachary Balthazor Webb's comment, February 28, 2014 5:38 AM
This shows what Laura went through before she decided to commit suicide. She thought there was no hope just like the guy talking in this article. This shows all people have different problems all over the world.
Rescooped by CJ Bever from Child Abuse In Jasper Jones Causes Conflict To Occur
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The Weather Underground

The Weather Underground | Jasper Jones | Scoop.it

he Weather Underground explores the unbelievable story of the Weathermen, the notorious group of 70 s radicals who, outraged by the Vietnam War and racism in America, went underground to wage a low-level war against the U.S. government, bombing targets across the country that they felt symbolized the real violence.
From pitched battles with police on Chicago’s city streets, to bombing the U.S. Capitol building, to breaking acid-guru Timothy Leary out of prison, this carefully organized clandestine network attempted to incite a national revolution, while successfully evading one of the largest FBI manhunts in history.
One of the top documentaries, this award-winning film interweaves extensive archival material with modern-day interviews to explore the incredible story of The Weather Underground.
As former members reflect candidly about the idealistic passion that drove them to bring the war home, they paint a compelling portrait of troubled and revolutionary times, with unexpected and often striking connections to the current world situation.


Via Sigalon, CJ Bever
CJ Bever's insight:

In Jasper Jones, the Vietnam War and racism play a significant role. Because of Jeffrey Lu's ethnicity, he faces many hardships and struggles on a daily basis. This kind of violence the people were doing in the article was spurred on because of the racism going on at the time in American during the Vietnam War.

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CJ Bever's curator insight, February 9, 2014 2:20 PM

In Jasper Jones, the Vietnam War and racism play a significant role. Because of Jeffrey Lu's ethnicity, he faces many hardships and struggles on a daily basis. This kind of violence the people were doing in the article was spurred on because of the racism going on at the time in American during the Vietnam War.

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Well-Paid Officials Arrested to Cheers: EBSCOhost

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Zachary Balthazor Webb's comment, February 26, 2014 3:47 PM
This really relates the officer who harasses Jasper Jones. This happens all over the world and is a very serious issue that should be looked at more.
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Women's Work Family Conflict —Some Remarks on the Situation of ...

Nowadays, work-family conflict (WFC) is a common phenomenon of modern life in many countries and cultural contexts, and it is becoming a global hot topic. WFC (Work Family Conflict) is the term often used to characterize ...
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Amygdala activation to masked happy facial expressions: EBSCOhost

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This article is about what part of the brain that effects our facial expressions and public personalities.

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How do public child healthcare professionals and primary school teachers id...: EBSCOhost

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This article explores how authority figures handle child abuse cases.

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Utah leads out on underage drinking prevention in national average - Deseret News

Utah leads out on underage drinking prevention in national average - Deseret News | Jasper Jones | Scoop.it
Deseret News
Utah leads out on underage drinking prevention in national average
Deseret News
The biennial state survey gauges alcohol and drug use among sixth-, eighth-, 10th- and 12th-graders in the state.
Luke Pearson's insight:

This article discusses how the state of Utah is  preventing underage drinking and also how they are controlling it. It relates to Jasper Jones in that jasper is an alcoholic as well. 

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CJ Bever's comment, February 9, 2014 1:45 PM
Jasper begins drinking and smoking at an early age in the book. This is really unhealthy especially because his father is an alcoholic. Because of Jasper's bad life and terrible luck, he seeks comfort in alcohol and cigarettes which is one of the worst things you can do, especially if you are young. Jasper was set up for a life of alcoholism by his father, and it is truly really sad to see this happen. We live in a really nice place where we are set up for success, and this book served as a wake up call to the fact that not everyone has good parents. It is sad to see kids underage drink so early and so heavily because of bad parental influence.
Alexander Land's comment, February 11, 2014 10:00 PM
Jasper is shown drinking frequently in the book, probably in an attempt to escape the pain that his difficult life has caused him. However, I think it is a little presumptuous to say he is an alcoholic just because he is drinking in a few scenes of the movie. It isn't unlikely though considering his circumstances and his family's history of alcohol abuse.
Richard Hartzell's comment, February 28, 2014 2:33 PM
Jasper drinking often most likely using the effects of alcohol as an escape from the problems and emotions he faces. The article explains that the more normalized alcohol is , the more integrated it is into the life of young people and they will be more likely to drink. For Jasper, alcohol is a very normal thing in his life, because his dad is an alcoholic.
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High risk alcohol-related trauma among the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Isl...: EBSCOhost

Alexander Land's insight:

Several of the Aboriginal families in the book have issues with alcoholism.  This article expands on some of the causes and reasons why Aboriginals have such a high risk of alcoholism.

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Katie Harnisch's comment, February 3, 2014 12:06 PM
Physical and mental abuse spurred by alcohol abuse is most definitely present in "Jasper Jones". In the case of Laura Wishart, it is revealed later in the book that she suffered directly at the hands of her father, who happened to have a horrible drinking problems. On more than on occasion while he was drunk, Laura's father sexually assaulted her, and near the very end of her life he brutally beat her nearly disfiguring her. Jasper Jones himself also suffered at the hands of Laura's abusive alcoholic father. While he was being questioned, Laura's father hit him in the face multiple times. Alcohol-related trauma plays a huge part in developing the plot of the story.
CJ Bever's comment, February 9, 2014 1:37 PM
Alcoholism and physical abuse in Jasper Jones is evident. Jasper 's father is an alcoholic and he has hit Jasper on several occasions. Because Jasper's father is an alcoholic, he only spends his money on liquor and can't afford to feed Jasper. Jasper then goes to Jack Lionel's and takes peaches for two weeks instead of meeting up with Laura. This ultimately leads Laura to kill herself because she for one is being abused by her alcoholic father, but also she assumes that Jasper has left her. If Jasper's father fed him, he probably never would have had to get the peaches and he could have remained meeting up with Laura, possibly comforting her because he knows what is it like to have an alcoholic dad.
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Family Conflict

Family Conflict | Jasper Jones | Scoop.it
Discover the most common causes of family tension, how to avoid family blow-ups, and how to resolve conflicts when they do occur. (Conflict resolution is an important skill for #caregivers to have. What other skills are important in #caregiving?
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Katie Harnisch's comment, February 3, 2014 2:42 PM
Family conflict is a huge problem in "Jasoer Jones". A negative family situation can have a huge impact in every part of an individual's life, and if the problem fails to get resolved, things may just escalate to a point where it is out of control. Negative feelings exist between Charlie and his mother in the story. Charlie's mother is incredibly unhappy with the life she is living and she thinks she deserves better, as a result, she takes all of her anger out on Charlie and his father,, which plays into the families' negative dynamics.
CJ Bever's comment, February 9, 2014 1:52 PM
Family conflicts effect every character in Jasper Jones. From Jasper and his alcoholic dad to the Wishart girls and their alcoholic, abusive father. There is even tension between Jasper and Lionel when he finds out that he is his grandfather. Jeffrey also faces family conflict when his relatives die, his mother's garden is vandalized, and when his mom finally catches him cursing in english. Charlie and his mother face conflict when he is caught sneaking out and when he has to dig the hole. The saddest conflict of all, however, is between Charlie's mother and father. They clearly are not happy together and they never show affection or get along. Especially Charlie's mom. Charlie's dad seems so indifferent towards Charlie's mom when she gets upset and angry. He just takes it every time. And when Charlie's mom walks out, nothing changes. You might expect him to run after her, picturing how happy he was with her on their wedding day, trying to make things get back to how they were then, or maybe at least make an effort to make things between them a little better. However, he just remains indifferent. He simply lets her go, and this family conflict is saddest of all. I can imagine growing up without a mom, as Charlie now has to do.
Alexander Land's comment, February 11, 2014 10:02 PM
affect* ^
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Austin Kruse's insight:

This article talks about the mortality rates of aboriginals and regular Australians. The two rates are compared and aboriginals are shown to live between 8 to 11 years less. This comes as no surprise considering the poor living conditons and current economic situation. I found it intersting that aborignals like Jasper Jones live much worse lives, along with constant mistreatment. These people are supposed to have the same rights as a regualr Australians, but they are somehow forgotten at times.

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Alexander Land's comment, February 9, 2014 6:42 PM
It is very interesting how people living in the same country are treated considerably different. This shows how distorted society's idea of separation is. This causes people to act selfish and self-centered. This is one of the main themes in the book. Charlie realizes how awful people are toward each other.
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Multiculturalism is not a dirty word (Australia)

Multiculturalism is not a dirty word (Australia) | Jasper Jones | Scoop.it

Multiculturalism was such a treasured part of my education when I was young. Learning about other countries, their cultures, beliefs and traditions was one of the most fascinating and exciting parts of my experiences growing up. I remember having a young Arab friend named Omar when I was in first grade, and I never thought for one second that that was unusual. My closest friends now, that I have treasured for so long, are Scottish, British and Papua New Guinean – not one of them is an Australian citizen. Do they deserve to be outcast from society because there are things that they might do or say differently? Should they be chastised or banned from singing, dancing or talking in the ways that they do because they might not be typically ‘Australian’ for every waking hour of every day? Who was it that decided on what was ‘Australian’ in the first place? If you ask this little expat, a few people around the country need to remember that the majority of the people here came from somewhere else anyway, be it British convicts, the Scots subject to Highland clearing, or the Islanders looking for somewhere new. We need to remember that we came together from so many places, we can’t just pull down a barrier and say “Sorry, we’re done developing now. No new experiences allowed.” Break away from that barrier. Multiculturalism is not a dirty word.


Via Cindy Sullivan
Zachary Balthazor Webb's insight:

This article really relates to Jeffery, but it also relates to Jasper and Charlie. Jeffery is a young Vietnamese boy who moved to Austalia during the Vietnam. This made him an outcast because of his race. He was the smart little asain boy who everyone judged. Jasper is judged mainly because of his parents. His mother died and his dad is a failure. Finally, Charlie lives a normal life as an Australian boy. He is just a little nerdy causing him to also be an outcast.

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Jack Moran's comment, February 6, 2014 4:26 PM
This article relates to additional research that I've done with the other articles for my research paper. There is a history of Australians being fed lies about Aboriginals by the media. European Australians were told that Aboriginals were less than human and could not be controlled. Jasper tells Charlie about this mistreatment when he says, "'They reckon I'm just half an animal with half a vote'"(31). This racism is fueled by a mob mentality. Lies are put out there by the media and they become popular enough that people believe them to be facts.
CJ Bever's comment, February 9, 2014 2:01 PM
I agree with what Jack said. Most of the time people believe what the media reports as facts. Sometimes we need to step back and realize that the media are paid to exaggerate stories and make them interesting for us. While this may seem entertaining at first, we are disappointed in the end to find out that we have been lied to. Racism is definitely fueled by mob mentality and sometimes I think it is something people pick up watching parents or watching media report things. Stereotypes are made, and people make racist jokes. People find them funny and they re tell them, and eventually it doesn't become a joke. It becomes hatred.
Richard Hartzell's comment, February 28, 2014 3:51 PM
In this article the author explains that multiculturalism is not a bad thing, but people make it seem like a bad thing for fear of the unknown. In the novel the Lu family are vietnamese and because of the war they are treated wrongfully because the other australians do not fully understand nor are educated about vietnamese people. Education is key for an individual to respect others that are different from themselves.
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Proper mixed-up: miscegenation among Aboriginal Australians: EBSCOhost

Jack Moran's insight:

Download the "Full PDF text" to read this one. It's pretty long so to summarize, it's a "half-caste's" view on laws that were once in place to prevent miscegenation in Australia and the general treatment of Aboriginals. 

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Kristi Nourie's insight:

Not exactly the best-written article, but this is a first-hand account of how Aboriginal children were treated in the 1950s.  (That's a decade or so before Jasper Jones, but that's pretty close.)

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Jack Moran's comment, January 21, 2014 5:17 PM
This article makes the mistreatment of Jasper seem almost tame. Children being taken from their mothers is on a whole different level. The author also describes the current condition of the half-castes for the community. She says, "They do not learn to speak, read or write English by the time they leave school. They just sit around with nothing to do because there are no jobs so they get into a lot of trouble." This is very similar to Jasper's situation. When talking to Charlie about making a living in the city he says, "' Even if I had've come down here of a weekend and taken back a sack full of crayfish, I would've killed the pig up there'"(157). Even if Jasper could manage to make a decent living by selling crayfish, it shows that there are very few opportunities for him.
Julie Tompkins's comment, January 26, 2014 9:03 PM
This article was so sad to read and envision scenes of children being taken away because of their race. It definitely compared to how Jasper is treated in the novel. The Aborigines were treated so cruel and this racism is depicted in the novel. Even though Jasper wasn't taken away from his family like in the article, he still had a harsh childhood to deal with. Reading this article made me think about how confused those children were when they were treated badly... They probably didn't understand they were being mistreated for their skin tone. It is sad to read about how the people couldn't get jobs and had to face poverty because of their race. This connects to Jasper's life in which he has to make an effort to live his own life and be responsible for himself. Jasper hasn't lost his beliefs and strength. That's what keeps him going is that Jasper knows "I matter. And I know I'll be alright. Because I got a good heart" (154).
Austin Kruse's comment, January 30, 2014 12:37 AM
Aboriginal mistreatment seems out of hand in Australia, and this article shows how this abuse has been going on for a long time. I can't imagine how a mother must feel when a person takes their own child away from them. The whole situation must be traumatizing, for the parents and children. In the book, Jasper Jones isn't taken away from his parents, however he is discriminated against. The pure hatred and discrimination against aboriginals is evident in the book and in real life. I can't believe that kids were being taken away from their parents for no reason, other than the fact that they were aboriginals. This article also took place in the 1950's! Not a whole lot of time has passed since these injustices occurred. It has to be hard to try and fight against racist people who have you outnumbered. Jasper tries to avoid confrontations as much as possible, but the mistreatment has to get to some aboriginals. Possibly to the extent of wanting to take their own life, and get rid of the pain, "For some people, it must be nice to know about dying. It must be a relief. What a world"(128).
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Child abuse has long-term effects - Beaver Dam Daily Citizen

Child abuse has long-term effects - Beaver Dam Daily Citizen | Jasper Jones | Scoop.it
Child abuse has long-term effects
Beaver Dam Daily Citizen
Child abuse 1; Child abuse 2.

Via Jocelyn Stoller, CJ Bever
CJ Bever's insight:

Child Abuse in Jasper Jones causes many conflicts. For one, when Laura is abused by her alcoholic father, it is probably the final string that causes Laura to kill herself. Jasper Jones was abused by his alcoholic father as well. This leads me to believe that Jasper and Laura bonded and grew so close as a result of the poor parenting and abuse they suffered. Not only will child abuse hurt the children physically, but the emotional and mental damage can be just as great. Laura cried after she was beaten up by her father every night, and Jasper probably felt heavy emotional pain too. The difference is Jasper covered it up and acted like he didn't care, but Laura cried. The mental effects are evident too. I feel like part of the reason Jasper and Laura began sneaking out at night was to get away from home. If you are abused at home, you will most likely have built a subconscious need to get away from home because of the pain you feel there. I feel like this child abuse and bad parenting led to Jasper and Laura sneaking out together to see each other every night. Also, because Jasper's dad was such a bad father and didn't feed him, Jasper had to go steal Jack Lionel's peaches at night to feed himself. This caused Laura to think that Jasper had disappeared. Laura, devastated at the loss of Jasper, being abused at home, and no longer having an escape from it (sneaking out with Jasper) probably felt that the only way to escape the world was through suicide. It is sad how child abuse can negatively effect our children, and this is very evident in Jasper Jones.    

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CJ Bever's curator insight, February 9, 2014 1:29 PM

Child Abuse in Jasper Jones causes many conflicts. For one, when Laura is abused by her alcoholic father, it is probably the final string that causes Laura to kill herself. Jasper Jones was abused by his alcoholic father as well. This leads me to believe that Jasper and Laura bonded and grew so close as a result of the poor parenting and abuse they suffered. Not only will child abuse hurt the children physically, but the emotional and mental damage can be just as great. Laura cried after she was beaten up by her father every night, and Jasper probably felt heavy emotional pain too. The difference is Jasper covered it up and acted like he didn't care, but Laura cried. The mental effects are evident too. I feel like part of the reason Jasper and Laura began sneaking out at night was to get away from home. If you are abused at home, you will most likely have built a subconscious need to get away from home because of the pain you feel there. I feel like this child abuse and bad parenting led to Jasper and Laura sneaking out together to see each other every night. Also, because Jasper's dad was such a bad father and didn't feed him, Jasper had to go steal Jack Lionel's peaches at night to feed himself. This caused Laura to think that Jasper had disappeared. Laura, devastated at the loss of Jasper, being abused at home, and no longer having an escape from it (sneaking out with Jasper) probably felt that the only way to escape the world was through suicide. It is sad how child abuse can negatively effect our children, and this is very evident in Jasper Jones.    

Richard Hartzell's comment, February 28, 2014 2:25 PM
This article helps explain that Laura was probably suffering from PTSD and since she was a female she most likely internalized her pain, which ultimately led her to take her own life.
Rescooped by Richard Hartzell from The Nation Split on Vietnam.
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Vietnam War inspires novel by North Plainfield native - MyCentralJersey.com

Vietnam War inspires novel by North Plainfield native - MyCentralJersey.com | Jasper Jones | Scoop.it
Vietnam War inspires novel by North Plainfield native
MyCentralJersey.com
He touts the book as an unconventional look at the Vietnam War — a view he said will challenge mainstream orthodoxy as to the nature of the war and why it was fought.
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Richard Hartzell's curator insight, February 21, 2014 3:03 AM

War in the eyes of a civilian, versus the experiences that veterans have had, can be where the two people don't see eye to eye.  The book, "The Odyssey Years: A Novel View of the Vietnam Experience," was written by Vietnam veteran Mike Konz.  In his book he gives non biased insight, and purely based off of experiences.  The liberal media often influenced the view civilians had on the war.  Charlie's dad held the opinion of it being a wasted cause.  However, others thought it was the duty of the nation to defend democracy in south Vietnam.  Opinions will almost always conflict during the time of war, especially during one of the more controversial wars of recent time.

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Alcohol Use and Related Problems Among College Students and Their Noncolleg...: EBSCOhost

Jake Elbrader's insight:

This article shows how the pressures of our society drives teens and young adults to make decisions they might not want to. The reason for this is that they want the feeling of being accepted and fitting in. They feel that if they give into peer pressure they might be cooler.

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Alexander Land's comment, February 21, 2014 10:18 AM
This relates to how Jasper and Charlie feel the pressure to the situation which causes them to make the choice of drinking. I think Charlie is kind of peer pressured by Jasper to drink so he can relate. Also he needs a mental escape from the situation he as been dragged in to. Also, I think that Jasper drinks because his father drinks so he thinks it is okay to do it himself. This article relates perfectly to these types of pressures that the characters constantly deal with in the book.
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Combating domestic violence: EBSCOhost

Jack Moran's insight:

This article is about fighting domestic violence and preventing it within a household. 

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How To Suggest Family Mediation to Resolve Conflict

How To Suggest Family Mediation to Resolve Conflict | Jasper Jones | Scoop.it
A falling out with children, parents, siblings or other family members can be the most difficult to bear. Family members have the ability to hurt us more than anyone else, but failing to address the conflict and move forward can ...
Luke Pearson's insight:

This article  offers a way to solve family conflict and how to address it within your family. In some ways this article relates to the book in that  Charlies parents have a conflict with each other and also Jasper and his dad have a conflict as well. 

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CJ Bever's comment, February 9, 2014 2:05 PM
I personally have meditiated before and it really puts me at peace. I feel like this is definitely Charlie's mother could have used. Charlie and his father seem more relaxed, indifferent, and laid back. On the other hand, Charlie's mother seems really stressed, upset, angry, and frustrated. This causes tension and family conflict in Charlie's family, and I feel like some laid back mediation consultation could really have helped Charlie's mom relax and let go of stress. It is too bad that she was so unhappy that she wanted to leave them both behind forever.
Austin Kruse's comment, February 13, 2014 11:24 PM
This article discusses different ways to solve family conflicts. This definitely relates to the book Jasper Jones because of all of the turmoil in Charlie's family. His family could make an effort to mend relationships among one another. Charlie's mother is mysterious, mean, and at times crazy. Charlie never really has a good relationship with his mother, so it could be mended by using some of the solutions that the article suggests. Either by meditating and thinking about things or just talking things out. Family conflicts can sometimes even cause kids to consider taking their own lives, "for some people it must be nice to know about dying. It must be a relief. What a world"(128).
Richard Hartzell's comment, February 28, 2014 2:36 PM
The article suggests how individuals within a family can suggest family mediation. Family mediation would of been incredibly beneficial in to Laura's life and could have possibly prevented her from taking her own life. She needed help talking to her mom about the abuse she was suffering from and mediation could have been the solution.
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Australia and the Vietnam War | Public Opinion

Australia and the Vietnam War | Public Opinion | Jasper Jones | Scoop.it
Australian public opinion about the war in Vietnam moved through several stages over the decade-long involvement … But public opinion and public protest played a relatively small role in policy decisions about Vietnam.

Via Mrs T
Zachary Balthazor Webb's insight:

This article tells us Australias importance in the Vietnam war. It helps us understand why Jeffery is shunned by the people in his comunity. It's wrong but racism is everywhere.

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Austin Kruse's comment, February 13, 2014 11:36 PM
The Australian people always opposed getting involved in the Vietnam war. Once they starting sending troops to Vietnam, outbreaks and protests immediately started. This hatred of getting involved in the war would eventually cause the people to despise Vietnamese people. It is clearly unfair and unjust to ever discriminate against anybody, but Jeffrey Lu and his family would feel Corrigan's wrath. Even the constant discrimination would lead to Jeffrey joking about the mistreatment with Charlie, "This is discrimination! I can't help that, Jeffrey. I'm a bigot" (116). The mistreatment in the Australian town of Corrigan was directly affected by the Vietnam war.
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Australia and the Vietnam War | The Vietnam War

Australia and the Vietnam War | The Vietnam War | Jasper Jones | Scoop.it
The Vietnam War was the longest conflict in which Australians have been involved; it lasted ten years, from 1962 to 1972, and involved some 60,000 personnel.

Via Mrs T
Alexander Land's insight:

This article really shows how the Vietnam war going on at the time affected the Australians, who were very involved.  This must be hard especially for Jeffrey and his family, who suffer the loss of several family members from the war.

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Jack Moran's comment, February 6, 2014 4:36 PM
It's interesting that only 500 Australian servicemen lost their lives in Vietnam out of the 60,000 that served. Any loss of life is devastating, but it seems like there wouldn't be much resentment towards Vietnamese people for numbers like that. I think the Lu's were mistreated because people were looking to pin their problems on anyone. We see this when men destroy An Lu's garden and yell, "'He's involved. He's red...He probably killed that young girl'"(230). They were weak people who will always need someone else to blame. I think that attitude is at the heart of all racists.
CJ Bever's comment, February 9, 2014 1:42 PM
The fact that the Vietnam War was going on during the book really helps portray the theme of Race/Ethnicity. Jeffrey faces racism everyday in the book. Just because he is Vietnamese he does not get to play in the cricket games even though he is probably the best player out there. Also, when the men ruin Mrs. Lu's beautiful lawn and garden it is out of racist spite. The men who did the horrid act only did it because Jeffrey's family is Vietnamese. Jeffrey won the game for their cricket team and just because of the color of his skin the opposing teams parents decide to vandalize his mother's priceless garden. It is truly sad to see how people can be hurt because of racism.
Richard Hartzell's comment, February 28, 2014 2:39 PM
It is dishearting the way groups of people will treat other who are different than them just because of their nationality or color of their skin. Jeffrey faced this hate during the war because he was of vietnamese descent.
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What does it mean to be Australian? - ABC Local

What does it mean to be Australian? - ABC Local | Jasper Jones | Scoop.it
What does it mean to be Australian? ABC Local "This is the ideal; it's not the reality, certainly for Aboriginal people, for poor people and it hasn't historically been the case for any minority in Australia, but it's worth trying to attempt." "Our...
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Alexander Land's comment, February 21, 2014 10:14 AM
This gives a good exposition to some of the characters in the book and their background and culture. Jasper Jones is aboriginal and is not treated well by the rest of the town. This shows how Aboriginals are not treated fairly or equally and kind of explains part of why Jasper Jones is looked down on so much in the town.
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Austin Kruse's insight:

This article is about aboriginals and their freedom in Austraila. In 2007, "UNDRIP" gave indigenous people certain right under international law.  However, these people are still discriminated against and are comprehensively searched in their own communities. Aboriginals are still mistreated, much like Jasper Jones. In the story Jasper feels like eveyone in town despises him because he is an aboriginal. He is constantly discriminated against and has certain rights taken from him. These indigenous people in Austrialia can realte to Jasper. 

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Tailoring a response to youth binge drinking in an Aboriginal Australian co...: EBSCOhost

Jack Moran's insight:

This is about improving health in an aboriginal community and stopping youth binge drinking. I thought this was interesting because Jasper drinks a lot and his dad is an alcoholic. 

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Luke Pearson's comment, February 11, 2014 3:34 PM
This relates to the novel in a huge way, one way being that Jasper has followed the footsteps of his dad as far as drinking goes. This article gives suggestions on how to stop drinking while this novel is about jasper and his dad being known for drinking a a lot. Also this article connects with the novel in that jasper is an aboriginal and this article gives ways on how to live a healthier life as an aboriginal.
Alexander Land's comment, February 21, 2014 10:11 AM
It is very sad to see Jasper falling into the same bad habits that have caused his dad to be the way he is in the book. This article relates perfectly and can be applied directly to Jasper's situation with drinking.
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Kristi Nourie's insight:

This one is just a short letter to the editor, but it certainly proves that anti-Aboriginal racism is alive and well in Australia.  Or it was in 2011.

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Julie Tompkins's comment, January 26, 2014 9:20 PM
I have to agree with Jack's post...this made me cringe to think that there is still anti-Aboriginal racism in Australia today. Racism and the effects of it are shown throughout this novel. The article referred to the word "Half-breed" as labeling someone and this made me think about how Jasper is compared to be seen as an animal to the townspeople. It's awful to think that people are seen as an animal to others... It's as though people only see the outside of someone and what they look like. These people think the truth of someone is determined from the outside, but the truth lies on the inside. Jasper Jones knows that the townspeople don't know the real him and he tries to be strong about it. Even though Jasper is independent and brave, but he still feels like "the smallest piece of dust in the universe. Like I'm unthinkable. It's a lonely feeling, but sort of makes me happy" (149). Just like Jasper, any Aboriginal that is mistreated would most likely feel lonely. They may feel secluded from the rest of society. The theme of racism has been a significant topic portrayed in this book and I have learned a lot from reading these articles about this subject. It is still a problem occurring in today's society, which is sad to think about.
Luke Pearson's comment, January 27, 2014 11:23 PM
Is this really going on in 2011? It would be so hard to live the life of an Aboriginal such as jasper and those living in Australia in 2011. The connection in the article with the novel is that in this article it talks about Aboriginals and it also mentions this term a lot in the book and the novel also says that jasper is an aboriginal. Jasper is made fun of and blamed for about everything because he is an Aboriginal. I can't imagine being jasper or better yet the people living in Australia. It seems that this is still going on in today's world or a least it was going in 2011 in Australia.
Austin Kruse's comment, January 30, 2014 12:11 AM
This letter is proof that blatant racists still exist in our world today. Racism is alive in America, along with in Australia. Jasper Jones knows that the racist townspeople despise him, so he tries to avoid them as much as possible. The life of an aboriginal seems extremely tough in Australia and I know that Jasper feels this hostility. The author of this letter has one clear opinion that she dislikes aboriginals and he/she doesn't understand why others don't too. The author shows pure hatred and racism towards aboriginals, much like the townspeople in the novel. This mistreatment can affect a person, "that makes a decent person feel like rubbish all his life because he's poorer and browner and motherless"(127).