Occupational health and safety.
28 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jason Grybaitis
Scoop.it!

The big 5 OHS issues.

The big 5 OHS issues. | Occupational health and safety. | Scoop.it
Jason Grybaitis's insight:

For my AINV11026 Class I have been asked to choose a target and point out 5 workplace faults, then talk about how they should be mitigated in that particular workplace.

 

So, without any introduction.

My mother, Wendy is my target.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jason Grybaitis
Scoop.it!

Manual Handling.

Manual handling is defined as Lifting, Carrying and Manually Handling tools, equipment or materials. Statistically the health and safety awareness in the workplace of manual handling injuries account for a high percentage of all workplace accidents. Clearly there is a need for a manual handling training program in every organisation because to some degree or other, everyone is exposed to the risk of incurring a manual handling injury.
Jason Grybaitis's insight:

The worst possible workplace issue is a manual handling accident.

A manual handling accident is the worst kind of health and safety accident because it is incredibly hard to mitigate the issue, it's also because of the amount of accidents that occur.

Manual handling accidents can be a wide range of things such as a strained back, working on ladders, repetitive motion, lifting objects that are too heavy and even finger cramps at a keyboard.

My target isn't too much into the lifting side of lifting heavy objects, but rather at the computer, filing and typing. 

The strain on fingers after a day of typing doesn't sound like much effort however she complains of back aches and finger cramps which is still a manual handling issue.

Safetycare.co.uk talks about the main causes of manual handling and the 3 listed examples are:

repetitive actions, with or without force;sustained and/or strained work postures;and exposure to whole body or hand-arm vibration.

 

I believe that these examples are very broad, but still relate heavily to my targets workplace.

 

 

more...
Dana O'Brien's curator insight, August 3, 2015 2:48 AM

Safety Care UK talks about the main causes of Manual Handling and the 3 listed examples that they give are:

Repetitive actions (with or without force)Sustained and/or strained work postureExposure to whole body or hand/arm vibration

 

Manual Handling can lead to injury through the development of musculoskeletal disorders. Approximately one third of all injuries that are reported yearly are due to incorrect manual handling postures/techniques that can be avoided in any workplace if adequate training is provided to all staff to ensure they are aware of the correct manual handling techniques.

 

 

Scooped by Jason Grybaitis
Scoop.it!

Falling, slipping and tripping.

Jason Grybaitis's insight:

Falling in a workplace, another huge issue in the work place. Falling can be anything from slipping on some spilled liquid, tripping on a cord across the group, all the way up to falling from a rooftop. Managing the risk of falls at workplaces - CoP 2011 is the code which practices how to stop tripping and fall hazards. It covers a whole section on managing the risk of a fall, working on platforms, devices to stop falling and controls to minimize the chance of falls.

My target has a fair bit to worry about at her workplace, there are stairs, cables, co-workers, machinery and countless other obstacles. 

The code also shows how these can be avoided (2.3), and in my targets case the best course of action is to ensure that there is nothing that obstructs they're path or blocks solid ground.

Falling over at work can be one of the most dangerous OHCS issues ever, there are countless ways to injure yourself just by falling, and that is why it is included in my topic.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jason Grybaitis
Scoop.it!

Big heights, bigger drop.

Big heights, bigger drop. | Occupational health and safety. | Scoop.it
Jason Grybaitis's insight:

My Aunt and Mum climbing the Story Bridge. 20 minutes of climbing, 10 minutes of gearing up and about 4 thousand hours of safety talks. After all, it's quite a drop and that water has the tension of concrete from that height.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jason Grybaitis
Scoop.it!

Basically everyone who is new in the construction industry.

Basically everyone who is new in the construction industry. | Occupational health and safety. | Scoop.it
Jason Grybaitis's insight:

While letting a dog do you job for you seems like a good idea, I'm sure somewhere, someone has a small objection to it. At least he's got his proper PPE on!

 

That posture though....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jason Grybaitis
Scoop.it!

A basic example of someone who has absolutely no idea what they're doing.

A basic example of someone who has absolutely no idea what they're doing. | Occupational health and safety. | Scoop.it
Jason Grybaitis's insight:

My silly Mother in her natural environment. No hardhat, no gloves, no boots or hi-vis clothing reading an OCHS manual. She rreeeeaaaallllyy knows what she's doing.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jason Grybaitis from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
Scoop.it!

TEPCO discloses extent of Fukushima radiation leak | Japan Daily News

TEPCO discloses extent of Fukushima radiation leak | Japan Daily News | Occupational health and safety. | Scoop.it

Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), the utility company that operates the disaster-stricken Fukushima nuclear power facility, has on Sunday released estimate figures on how much radiation-contaminated water has leaked out of its facility, the first such data the company has released to the public since the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami caused a multiple reactor meltdown at the facility. TEPCO estimates the total amount of radioactive water leaked into the Pacific Ocean since May 2011 to be between 20 trillion to 40 trillion becquerels.

 

Last month, the embattled operator confirmed the suspicions of ocean contamination held by the public and Japan’s Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA). The NRA had earlier said that it doubted TEPCO’s continued claims at that time that the toxic water was contained safely in the facility. Of these current numbers, TEPCO said that the scale of the radioactive leak from May 2011 to July 2013 was still around the allowed level under safety regulations before the accident, which was set at 22 trillion becquerels annually. TEPCO said that it would also be estimating the amount of strontium – another byproduct of the decommissioning process which is unfortunately cancer-causing – that may have also leaked out over the years.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Jason Grybaitis's insight:

Tokyo Electric Power Co. has leaked between 20 trillion to 40 trillion becquerels of radiation contaminated water into the pacific ocean since the 2011 disaster. To put this into perspective, that's between 800,000 to 1,000,000 Liters of contaminated water in our ocean.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jason Grybaitis from Palestine
Scoop.it!

Why Are So Many Workers Dying in Oil Fields? | The Nation

Why Are So Many Workers Dying in Oil Fields? | The Nation | Occupational health and safety. | Scoop.it
Lax safety standards prevent OSHA from investigation the majority of oil field accidents.

Via Ramy Jabbar رامي
Jason Grybaitis's insight:

Oil fields claiming lives of workers. This area of the industry is incredibly risky and very prone to accidents. So prone in fact, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is only required to investigate the accidents that cause either hospitalizing 3 or more, or a fatality. Solid effort.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jason Grybaitis from Workplace Accidents
Scoop.it!

Firm fined after worker loses leg in scaffold fall

Firm fined after worker loses leg in scaffold fall | Occupational health and safety. | Scoop.it

A worker who had no recognised training as a scaffolder had to have a lower leg amputated after he fell from unguarded scaffolding, a court has heard.

 

Andrew Gore, 37, from Mountain Ash, was helping to dismantle the scaffolding outside a nursing home in Merthyr Mawr Road, Bridgend, when he fell around four metres to the ground.


Via HealthSafety
Jason Grybaitis's insight:

Due to poor management and required skills, Andrew Gore has fallen and suffered severe injuries and an amputation after a scaffolding mishap. Mr. Gore was working on a 2nd level lift and lent on a piece of  scaffolding which hadn't been properly secured. Unfortunately the scaffolding had fallen apart leading Andrew to a 4 meter drop. 


more...
Safety Train's curator insight, July 1, 2014 5:18 AM

Four metres might not sound much - but it was enough for him to lose his leg

Rescooped by Jason Grybaitis from Workplace Accidents
Scoop.it!

Bus operator sentenced over death of young employee

Bus operator sentenced over death of young employee | Occupational health and safety. | Scoop.it

Regional bus operator West Midlands Travel was today fined £150,000 after an employee died when he was crushed between two buses.

 

Lee Baker, a 24-year-old assistant mechanic, was working a night shift at the company’s depot in Carl Street, Walsall, when the incident happened in the early hours of Saturday 22 October 2011.

 

Wolverhampton Crown Court heard that he was attempting to move a double-decker bus to get access to a pit, but the reverse gear wouldn’t work. He and a colleague attempted to push it backwards to get it past a single-decker parked ten feet away and sideways on to the double-decker.

 

Mr Baker, who had worked with the company since 2006, went into the cab of the bus, which has an automatic safety device engaging the parking brake when the doors are open. He intended to put the gearbox in neutral but inadvertently left it in drive.

 

As a result, when he got off and closed the doors, the parking brake automatically disengaged after three seconds and the bus moved towards the two men who were then in front of the bus ready to push. Although his colleague managed to jump out of the way, Mr Baker didn’t and was crushed between the two vehicles.


Via HealthSafety
Jason Grybaitis's insight:

£150,000 pounds to pay for the life of Lee Baker, a mechanics assistant who was tragically crushed between 2 buses due to his own negligence. 

Mr. Baker had attempted to move a bus with a colleague because the reverse gear was damaged. They had moved the bus to where it was needed and Lee had jumped into the cab to engage the park

brake. Unfortunately, Lee had accidentally left the bus in Drive gear, which disengaged the park brake and sending the bus forward and crushing him. His colleague had managed to dive out of the way and had to witness the accident.

more...
Safety Train's curator insight, July 2, 2014 6:26 AM

So why was the engine running?

Rescooped by Jason Grybaitis from Workplace Health and Safety
Scoop.it!

POLICE CHIEF FACING SAFETY CHARGE

POLICE CHIEF FACING SAFETY CHARGE | Occupational health and safety. | Scoop.it
A chief constable will appear in court today accused of health and safety breaches after a man was shot dead by one of his officers. Sir Peter Fahy, chief co...

Via David Cant CMIOSH
Jason Grybaitis's insight:

Chief Constable Sir Peter Fah will appear in court for the planned operation to stop Anthony Grainger. The Constable had ordered his marksman take down Mr. Grainger upon stopping his vehicle. The alleged however, was not armed nor threatening, thus the constable has failed to follow the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and has been charged with failure to discharge a duty.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jason Grybaitis from Occupational Safety and Health
Scoop.it!

Seven miners killed in landslide in Indonesia

Seven miners were killed and five were unaccounted for following a landslide that occurred at a traditional gold mining site in Baya Biru, Paniai regency, Papua, on Tuesday at around 11 p.m. local time. Two other miners survived the incident.


Via AMRC Hong Kong
Jason Grybaitis's insight:

Tragic accident in India on the 1st of July. Several miners have been killed due to a landslide. I don't believe this is the first occurrence of a landslide in India. Moving an entire goldmine seems quite impossible, something must be done to prevent these horrific events.

more...
Daisy's curator insight, March 25, 5:32 AM

Firstly wouldn't you think that this could have been foreseen or at least considered as a possibility! I find these really infuriating as this could have been prevented. Human error, always human error. Check a weather radar before you go camping on a muddy hill! I want to be able to foreseen situations/scenarios that may not be considered as a possibility for others. Camping for a few nights or not but a lot can happen in that small window of time. 


 


Daisy Sawyer

Hannah Lynch's curator insight, July 23, 11:47 PM

Mining is an industry where OHS is a major concern. As seen with Black Lung Disease is an example of the impacts of this industry on workers in Australia.

Scooped by Jason Grybaitis
Scoop.it!

Even Google thinks the health industry is over-regulated - SFGate (blog)

Even Google thinks the health industry is over-regulated - SFGate (blog) | Occupational health and safety. | Scoop.it
Entrepreneur Even Google thinks the health industry is over-regulated SFGate (blog) Google has been taking bold steps into the health realm lately, from forming a biotechnology company to extend life to developing a contact lens for diabetics.
Jason Grybaitis's insight:
Big name giants Google, believe the health industry is over-regulated. This is a very stale clamin considering Google has some of the best technology and resourses available.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jason Grybaitis
Scoop.it!

Falling objects.

Jason Grybaitis's insight:

Falling objects are another big issue with work sites. The main reason that falling objects are a big concern is because unless there is someone else to warn another about the falling object, you cannot see it. 

This article talks about having persons conducting a 

business or undertaking (PCBUs) as a management roll in ensuring the safety of personnel from falling objects, however they're not available all the time, so what can be done?

Because the PBCU is in a management position, they can coordinate their supervisors to setup exclusion zones underneath hazardous areas, keep an eye on equipment that is being used on scaffolding or raised platforms.

This references back to my target for 2 reasons, above the stairway is a small kitchen area with boiling water, glass, porcelain, steel and other such hazards. In the warehousing area, there is stacks upon stacks of various electrical goods and shelving that has parts resting on top that if bumped, could fall and land on someone.

Falling objects are always going to be a hazard, there will always be that potential of harm to a human, however especially these days, there is no way to work around this. The only solution is to mitigate the risk with controls and training. 


 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jason Grybaitis
Scoop.it!

Working with machinery.

Jason Grybaitis's insight:

Countless times I've heard workers getting injured from machine accidents. Working with machinery is a very dangerous way to work, however it is much easier to complete the task.

Workcover.nsw.gov.au has a huge written pdf all about safety equipment with machinery in operation and all the hazards that come with it.

I've been to the solar panel factory where my target works, there is constant forklift usage and trucks reversing in and out.

The documents control methods talk mainly about controlling the hazard at its source, completely taking away the possible danger. 

I feel as if removing personnel from an area with machinery in operation or an exclusion zone would be beneficial, but could possibly hinder the operation.

Working with machinery will always have hazards and accidents, the productivity that comes along with them heavily outweighs any hazard concerns.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jason Grybaitis
Scoop.it!

Electricity.

Electricity. | Occupational health and safety. | Scoop.it
Appliance Tagging Services, your national test and tag experts. RCD Testing, Exit, Emergency Light Inspection, Microwave Leakage. Franchise opportunities, learn more.
Jason Grybaitis's insight:

Electricity burns or shocks are a very big issue within work sites.

ATS describes a few of the consequences of improper use of electric powered machines and how to detect and avoid any potential hazards.

Relating this back to my chosen targets workplace, the factory is housing many electrical components as it is a solar panel company. It's not just the factory that is the issue though, The upstairs office is full of computers, printers, scanners and such that are all plugged into power boards and adapters. These are all electrical hazards with many risks too.

Electricity in the workplace is probably the most wide used source of power with constant hazards, which always has the potential to cause an accident.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jason Grybaitis
Scoop.it!

Fishing is fun and funny.

Fishing is fun and funny. | Occupational health and safety. | Scoop.it
Jason Grybaitis's insight:

My Grandfather and I went out fishing one afternoon. What you don't see, is how I fell in the water afterwards from slipping on the rocks. Just goes to show how something so small and unnoticed can be quite harmful.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jason Grybaitis
Scoop.it!

A daily occurrence.

A daily occurrence. | Occupational health and safety. | Scoop.it
Jason Grybaitis's insight:

Ian (the boss) is once again questioning Michele were the morning coffee is. Without the morning coffee, everyone fights with one another. I'm pretty sure that's an OCHS issue, right?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jason Grybaitis from The NewSpace Daily
Scoop.it!

Scaled Composites accident - Mojave Desert, California | Knights Arrow

Scaled Composites accident - Mojave Desert, California | Knights Arrow | Occupational health and safety. | Scoop.it

On 26th July 2007, there was a fatal accident in which three people died. This accident happened during testing of a rocket system intended for use in Virgin Galactic’s passenger carrying space-craft; ‘Spaceship Two’.

 

The accident has caused much concern in the international rocket-engineering community and resulted in a lot of speculation.

 

Details of the accident have never been fully released nor published.

 

The investigation report from California Occupational Safety and Health Administration has recently been obtained under the California Public Information Act.

 

This is the first time that the rocket-engineering community has had an opportunity to better understand what occurred and the safety issues the accident raised.

 


Via Stratocumulus
Jason Grybaitis's insight:

3 people have been killed due to a spaceship mishap.

Although there has been hardly any information released on the accident, an investigation team believes Nitrous Oxide to be the blame. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jason Grybaitis
Scoop.it!

NTSB: Hawaii plane floated 25 mins, then sank - Hawaii News Now

NTSB: Hawaii plane floated 25 mins, then sank - Hawaii News Now | Occupational health and safety. | Scoop.it
NTSB: Hawaii plane floated 25 mins, then sank Hawaii News Now HONOLULU (AP) - The National Transportation Safety Board says in in a preliminary accident report that a small commercial plane that crash-landed in Hawaii waters floated for about 25...
Jason Grybaitis's insight:

A small commercial airliner has crashed in the waters around Hawaii claiming the life of Hawaii Health Director Loretta Fuddy. Luckily, all the other passengers managed to survive and board an emergency lifeboat. 25 minutes later, the plane sunk.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jason Grybaitis from Workplace Accidents
Scoop.it!

Inspections challenge construction sites to ‘Think Health’

Inspections challenge construction sites to ‘Think Health’ | Occupational health and safety. | Scoop.it

Poor working conditions likely to lead to ill health on building sites will be targeted this month as work continues to reduce death, injury and ill health in the industry.

 

For every fatal accident in the construction industry, it is estimated that a worker is at least 100 times more likely to die from a disease caused or made worse by their work.


Via HealthSafety
Jason Grybaitis's insight:

I've worked in the construction industry for a solid 3 years. Although that isn't a long time, I believe I understand the ropes of the industry.

90% of construction workers I've met care very little for safe practices. In fact I've been victim to some of these and have had broken bones as a result, yet the entire incident had been pushed under the rug. The Inspections Challenge to 'Think Health' is a poor exercise that will be disregarded and brushed off like it's nothing. Sadly, I don't believe that this system will ever change. People will always contest safety, they will always find shortcuts to finish a job regardless of the safe working practices put in place. 

Unless we step up our game, and have as much control as we need to ensure a safe environment for everyone, have everyone follow safety conducts and highly regulated safety workplace act, nothing will change.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jason Grybaitis from Workplace Accidents
Scoop.it!

Badly stacked boards crush joinery worker | Construction News | The Construction Index

Badly stacked boards crush joinery worker | Construction News | The Construction Index | Occupational health and safety. | Scoop.it
An Essex joinery firm has been fined for safety failings after an employee was crushed by half a tonne of fibreboard (MDF) at its premises in Basildon.

Via HealthSafety
Jason Grybaitis's insight:

Ab employee of Specialist Joinery Projects Ltd has suffered two collapsed lungs, a broken collar bone, five broken ribs and a gash to his head because of some poorly stacked, unrestrained boards.

The 50yr old man had been crushed and trapped for several minutes while the boards be removed. It's a surprise that there wasn't a fatality from this particular incident.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jason Grybaitis from Workplace Accidents
Scoop.it!

Construction firm sentenced after worker’s leg trapped

Construction firm sentenced after worker’s leg trapped | Occupational health and safety. | Scoop.it

A construction firm has been fined for safety failings after a worker was seriously injured when an excavation trench collapsed on his leg.

 

Paul Fennelly, then aged 45 from Hamilton, was working for Galliford Try Infrastructure Ltd, trading as Morrison Construction, at a site off the B9012 near Duffus, Moray, when the incident occurred on 1 July 2011.

 

Elgin Sheriff Court was told today (3 July) that after he had been told the water supply had been turned off, Mr Fennelly was cutting a section of cast iron water pipe within a 1.3 metre deep excavation trench. There was a sudden gush of water from the pipe and when Mr Fennelly took avoiding action and moved to the other side of the pipe, part of the trench collapsed trapping his right leg against the pipe and covering it with clay.

 

His colleagues dug him out and he was taken to hospital with a snapped thigh bone. He had an operation to insert a pin and bolts and was in hospital for 10 days. Mr Fennelly had to use walking sticks for five months and was unable to return to work until 11 months later.

 

He took up alternative employment but is not currently working as he needs a further operation and is still in considerable pain.


Via HealthSafety
Jason Grybaitis's insight:

Paul Fennelly, general labourer has had his thigh bone badly broken after an excavated trench collapse trapping him. Mr. Fennelly was left without work for 11 months and physically handicapped for 5 of those months.

The investigators had deemed the trench was dug to protocol and was safe however a small exposure to water had been overlooked. this seeped into the soil causing the ground to become sloppy and eventually collapsing.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jason Grybaitis from Workplace Health and Safety
Scoop.it!

Health and Safety ‘red tape’ cut will threaten workers’ lives

The government’s fervent desire to cut back on “key” health and safety legislation will increase accidents and fatalities in the workplace, says TUC.

Via David Cant CMIOSH
Jason Grybaitis's insight:

So, the government in the UK has decided to cut back spending on HSE because fatalities and injuries are genuinely just accidents.

Every accident can be prevented with the right safety and control measure in place.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jason Grybaitis
Scoop.it!

Day one of Lakeshore Park demolition focuses on hazmat - WBIR-TV

Day one of Lakeshore Park demolition focuses on hazmat - WBIR-TV | Occupational health and safety. | Scoop.it
WBIR-TV Day one of Lakeshore Park demolition focuses on hazmat WBIR-TV They are beginning survey work of the nine buildings that will be torn down over the next few months. The actual demolition work will likely start next week.
Jason Grybaitis's insight:
Knoxville's Lakeshore Park is getting a facelift due to asbestos and outdated facilities The mental health institute will be demolished to make way for future developements including, a track for local runners and athletes. The total cost for demolition and clean up will cost over $5 million USD.
more...
No comment yet.