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Teen sleep: Why is your teen so tired?

Teen sleep: Why is your teen so tired? | School-Megan | Scoop.it
Teen sleep cycles may not match family and school schedules. Help them synchronize.
Megan Rose's insight:

http://healthyliving.msn.com/health-wellness/teen-sleep-why-is-your-teen-so-tired-1

A = Amount of sleep needed

C = Causes of tiredness

S = Suggestions for improving sleep

 

A-Most teens need about 9 hours of sleep each night, and sometimes more, to maintain optical daytime alertness.

S-Adjust the lighting in your teens room. Dim the lights as bedtime approaches, then turn off the lights during sleep. In the morning expose your teen to bright light. These simple cues help signal when it's time to  sleep and time to wake up.

S-Stick to a schedule. Encourage your teen to go to bed and get up at the same time everyday, even on the weekends. Cut down on extra-curricular activities and curb late night social time as needed. Some teens have a job, if so limit working hours to no more than 16 to 20 hours a week.

S-Nix long naps. If your teen is drowsy during the day, a 30 minutes nap afterschool might be refreshing. Be cautious though, too much daytime sleep might only make it harder to fall asleep at night.

S-Cut of caffiene. Caffiene may help your teen stay awake during class, but the effects are fleeting, and too much caffiene can interfere with a good night's sleep.

S-Keep it calm. Encourage your teen to wind down at night with a warm shower, a book or other relaxing activities. Discourage stimulating activities, including vigorous exercise, loud music, video games, television, computer use and text messaging, an hour or two before bedtime.

S-Know when to unplug. Take the TV out of your teens room, or keep it off at night. The same goes for your teens cellphone, computer or other electronic gagdets.

S-Sleeping pills and other medications generally aren't recomended. For many teens, lifestyle changes can effectively improve sleep.

C-In some cases, excessive daytime sleepiness can be a sign of something  more than a problem with your teens internal clock.

C-Medication side effects. Many medications, including over-the-counter cold and allergy medications and prescription medications to treat depression and attention deficit/hyperactive disorder, can disrupt sleep.

C-Insomnia or biological clock disturbance. If your teen is having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, he or she is likely to struggle with daytime sleepiness.

C-Depression. Sleeping too much or too little is a common sign of depression.

C-Obstructive sleep apnea. When throat muscles fall slack during sleep, they stop air from moving freely through the nose and windpipe. This can interfere with breathing and disrupt sleep. You might notice loud snoring or intermittent pauses in breathing, often followed by snorting and more snoring.

C-Restless legs syndrome. This condition causes a creepy senstion in the legs and an irrestistable urge to move the legs, usually shortly after going to bed. The discomfort and movement can interupt sleep.

C-Narcolepsy. Sudden daytime sleep, usually for only short periods of time, can be a sign of narcolepsy. Narcoleptic episodes can occur at any time, even in the middle of a conversation. Sudden attacks of muscle weakness in response to emotions such as laughter, anger or surprise are possible, too.

S-You can contact your teens doctor if you're concerned about their daytime sleepiness. If your teen is depressed or has a sleep disorder, proper treatment can be the key to a good night's sleep.

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My Nose Made Me Buy It: How Retailers Use Smell (and Other Tricks) to Get You to Spend, Spend, Spend | TIME.com

My Nose Made Me Buy It: How Retailers Use Smell (and Other Tricks) to Get You to Spend, Spend, Spend | TIME.com | School-Megan | Scoop.it
Think you're using your head to make purchases? Think again.
Megan Rose's insight:

http://healthland.time.com/2013/12/16/my-nose-made-me-buy-it-how-retailers-use-smell-and-other-tricks-to-get-you-to-spend-spend-spend/

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Concussions: What you should know

Megan Rose's insight:

http://elibrary.bigchalk.com/elibweb/elib/do/document?set=search&dictionaryClick=&secondaryNav=advance&groupid=1&requestid=lib_standard&resultid=19&edition=&ts=0213A98DA46D0F1F52FD812A078DCFC7_1389569728828&start=1&publicationId=&urn=urn%3Abigchalk%3AUS%3BBCLib%3Bdocument%3B212221048D = dangers of concussions

G = guidelines for students to return to activities

S = suggestions for solving the problem of concussions

 

G-Doctors generally say that physical activity should begin slowly, first with walking and then slow jogging. If no symptoms, the person can resume more active sports.

S-Many local schools have begun requiring students to take computerized assessments, such as the IMPACT test, to provide a baseline of the student's normal mental performance. 

D-After a concussion it may take a while for students to resume to their full course load. Doctors usually suggest students drop the subjects that can most easily be picked up after a break.

D-Children through adolescence are thought to face more danger because their brains are still developing. 

D-Through adolescence, brain cells are adding insulation, called myelination, which helps transmit signals and strengthens brain connections.

D-The brain is more vulnerable to damage before it is fully myelinated. 

D-The heads of younger children are large relative to their bodies and their necks not as strong, which causes more movement upon impact, potentially causing more injury to the brain. 

D-Concussions can lead to four major catagories of symptoms: Cognitive symptoms, which might include trouble with memory, attention, or learning; sleep problems, including too much, too little, or trouble falling asleep; head pain, including migraines and sensitivity to light and noise; and emotional symptoms such as irritability, lack of impulse control, severe anxiety, depression, or suicidal thoughts. 

D-People who already often have migraines, depression, anxiety, or ADHD, often take longer to recover.



 

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Tips for sleepy teens

Megan Rose's insight:

http://elibrary.bigchalk.com/elibweb/elib/do/document?set=search&dictionaryClick=&secondaryNav=advance&groupid=1&requestid=lib_standard&resultid=20&edition=&ts=825FB7B94EDE9B40455D39EB04F770C1_1389818036653&start=1&publicationId=&urn=urn%3Abigchalk%3AUS%3BBCLib%3Bdocument%3B196023309

A = Amount of sleep needed

C = Causes of tiredness

S = Suggestions for improving sleep

C-Waking up too early for school.

By Emsellem

S-Shift their responsibility. Ask your teen "How can I help you take responsibility for this?" They need to learn to wake up without you sooner or later. If they still need help, limit it. For example, a parent might offer to check once to see if the teen is awake. "If you walk in the room four times every morning, they know you will keep doing that."

S-Educate them. Ask them to keep a log of their sleep patterns for a couple of weeks. Just seeing how little sleep they get may help them make changes, such as finishing homework and getting to bed earlier. 

S-Watch out for weekends.  Typical teens compound their problems by staying up and getting up much later on weekends, pushing their body clocks off school-week schedules. Teens should get up no later than an hour or two later than on weekdays. 

S-Enlighten them. Tell teens that light from computer and TV screens just before bedtime will keep them awake. Light in the morning will help them wake up.

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High school athletes found more vulnerable to concussions

High school athletes found more vulnerable to concussions | School-Megan | Scoop.it
High school athletes are more at risk of concussions than their collegiate counterparts, a study finds.
Megan Rose's insight:

http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/31/health/athletes-concussions/index.html?iref=allsearch

D = dangers of concussions

G = guidelines for students to return to activities

S = suggestions for solving the problem of concussions

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