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A Tale of Two Factory Disasters: What Cambodia Can Teach Bangladesh | TIME.com

A Tale of Two Factory Disasters: What Cambodia Can Teach Bangladesh | TIME.com | School Jessica Hun. | Scoop.it
As the final death toll of the Bangladesh factory collapse reached 1,126 last week, a small section of the second floor of a shoe factory in Cambodia gave way.
Jessica Hunsicker's insight:

http://world.time.com/2013/05/20/a-tale-of-two-factory-disasters-what-cambodia-can-teach-bangladesh/
C = the working conditions of garment factory workers

R = the responsibility manufacturing companies, consumers, and/or governments have in the issueif you want, you may use Rm (manufacturing), Rc (consumers), Rg (government)

S = suggestions for solving the problem

 

C: 2nd floor of a shoe factory in cambodia gave way. 2 people died

 

C: death toll reached 1,126

 

C: 10 more workers in Cambodia (pregnant woman included) were injured when an outdoor platform where workers took breaks toppled over

 

C: there have been a string of garment factory fires that have killed nearly 400 people

 

C/R: in cambodia, new monitoring system (international labor organization (ILO) program called better factories), watching germent factories


R: bangladesh is considering better factories


R: better factories was cambodia's first step towards an industrial revolution


R: in cambodia, better factories have kept children out of garment factories


C: report by the Cambodian government found that nearly half of garment workers were anemic, (condition causing fatigue that’s associated with malnourishment)


C: minimum wage “provides enough nutrients to survive, but it doesn’t mean you won’t feel hungry.”


C: workers could be fired in cambodia at the drop of a hat because 80% of workers are employed by short term contracts


C: 88% of factories were violating limits on overtime


C: 55% of factories weren’t providing safe drinking water

 

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My Nose Made Me Buy It: How Retailers Use Smell (and Other Tricks) to Get You to Spend, Spend, Spend | TIME.com

My Nose Made Me Buy It: How Retailers Use Smell (and Other Tricks) to Get You to Spend, Spend, Spend | TIME.com | School Jessica Hun. | Scoop.it
Think you're using your head to make purchases? Think again.
Jessica Hunsicker's insight:

http://healthland.time.com/2013/12/16/my-nose-made-me-buy-it-how-retailers-use-smell-and-other-tricks-to-get-you-to-spend-spend-spend/ ;

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Concussions: What you Should Know

Jessica Hunsicker's insight:

http://elibrary.bigchalk.com/elibweb/elib/do/document?set=search&dictionaryClick=&secondaryNav=advance&groupid=1&requestid=lib_standard&resultid=19&edition=&ts=0213A98DA46D0F1F52FD812A078DCFC7_1389569728828&start=1&publicationId=&urn=urn%3Abigchalk%3AUS%3BBCLib%3Bdocument%3B212221048

 

D = dangers of concussions

G = guidelines for students to return to activities

S = suggestions for solving the problem of concussions

 

G - no standard time for how long a concussion will last

 

G - slowly begin physical activity. walking, move on to jogging and more vigorous activities

 

G/D - not taking the time to heal a concussion can result it in getting worse

 

G - people who suffer from migraines or depression, anxiety, or ADHD, will take longer to heal

 

ntk - why is it often more common and worse in children than adults?


b/c children's brains and bodies are still developing, making them more vunerable.

 

D - trouble with memory, attention and learning.

 

D - sleep issues (too little or too much sleep). trouble falling asleep.

 

D - head pains (migraines, sensitivity to light and noise) 

 

D - emotional symptoms -  irritability, lack of impulse control, severe anxiety, depression, suicidal thoughts

 

D - dizziness and headaches

 

 

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Clothing brands face tough call on Bangladesh

Jessica Hunsicker's insight:

http://elibrary.bigchalk.com/elibweb/elib/do/document?set=search&groupid=1&requestid=lib_standard&resultid=5&urn=urn:bigchalk:US;BCLib;document;215891378&style=printable&edition=&start=1&language=

C = the working conditions of garment factory workers

R = the responsibility manufacturing companies, consumers, and/or governments have in the issue

if you want, you may use Rm (manufacturing), Rc (consumers), Rg (government)

S = suggestions for solving the problem

 

C: the actual building collapsed, killing more than 950 workers and injuring 2,500

 

ntk: how was the building not deemed unsafe if it was in risk of collapsing?

 

Answer to the question above and also Rg: Bangladesh is incredibly corrupt; building codes and fire codes are not enforced.


ntk: are building fires very common in Bangladesh?

 

apparently they are

 

ntk + S: if it's so dangerous to make clothing in Bangladesh, perhaps the us can manufacture clothes elsewhere?

 

Rc: Bangladesh has the lowest labor costs in the world. 


C: minimum wage is $38 a month


R: retailers aren't responsible for not knowing the conditions of the factories their products are being made in


R: retailers don't do direct business with the production of their product


S: us companies need to take ownership of their supply chains


S: us companies need to make the expense of sending someone directly to the facility where their product is being made to see the conditions the laborers are working in for themselves


R: none of the retailers (about 30 os them) want to take responsibility and admit to what's happened to the facility their products are being manufactured in 


R: this is partially because some of the smaller labels don't want to send so much money to pay for the worker's injuries


R: calvin klein and tommy hilfiger labels are trying to enlist others in a multibillion-dollar effort to upgrade bangladeshi factories


R: they're having trouble finding other retailors to sign up and help b/c they don't want to seem responsible for the conditions there in the first place


C: In bangladesh there is a complete disregard for human life


R/C: Disney considering to leave bangladesh could seriously hurt the workers it leaves unemployed. without their meager wages, they woul starve to death


S: there  is a need for a revolution that says it matters where products are made, and that if you are producing in sweatshops under unhealthy conditions, you will be held accountable


S: a way to monitor where your purchases are coming from is GoodGuide.com (phone app). you enter the social and environmental issues that are important to you, and scan barcodes in the store to see how products score



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High school athletes found more vulnerable to concussions

High school athletes found more vulnerable to concussions | School Jessica Hun. | Scoop.it
High school athletes are more at risk of concussions than their collegiate counterparts, a study finds.
Jessica Hunsicker's insight:

http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/31/health/athletes-concussions/index.html?iref=allsearch

 

D = dangers of concussions

G = guidelines for students to return to activities

S = suggestions for solving the problem of concussions

 

S - high school athletes who played football, lacrosse, soccer and baseball were more likely to experience concussions than college-age players. maybe don't play these sports? or play them carefully with the safety of others in mind? stagger practices and games, give yourself time to heal between each time you participate

 

D - women are more prone to concussions than men.

 

D - Women's ice hockey had the highest rate of concussions.

 

D/S - people who have already experienced a concussion are most likely to experience another

 

 

 

 

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