Jane Goodall
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Jane Goodall Abstract

Jane Goodall Abstract | Jane Goodall | Scoop.it
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Jane Goodall is a British primatologist, ethologist, anthropologist, and UN Messenger of Peace. She is considered to be the world’s foremost expert on chimpanzees, and has spent forty five years studying social and family interactions of wild chimpanzees in Tanzania. She is also the founder of the Jane Goodall Institute, which works extensively to empower people to make a difference for all living things. 

Jane Goodall was born in 1934 to Mortimer Herbert Morris-Goodall, a businessman, and Margaret Myfanwe Joseph, a novelist. She was born in London, England, and grew fond of chimpanzees and animals in general, despite living in a metropolitan area. This was mostly due to a lifelike chimpanzee toy that was given to her by her father. To this day, that chimpanzee toy still sits on her dresser in London. She spent her childhood in London, but once she entered her young adulthood she decided to move to Africa. 

in 1957, she moved to a friend’s farm in the Kenya highlands. Once there, she made a phone call to a man named Louis Leakey, who was an archaeologist and paleontologist who believed that studying great apes could help indicate the behavior of early hominids, and he was looking for a chimpanzee researcher. However, Goodall was unaware of this and was simply interested in discussing animals over tea. After the meeting, Leakey proposed that Goodall work as a secretary for him, which she agreed to. They left for Olduvai Gorge in Tanzania to lay out their plans. 

In 1958, Leakey sent Goodall back to London to study primate behavior and anatomy, being that she had no college studies or primate studies previously in her life. Then, in 1960, she went to Gombe Stream National Park, where Goodall would spend nearly forty five years of her life. In 1962, Goodall took a break from Tanzania, when Leakey sent Goodall to Cambridge University where she obtained a Ph.D degree in theology, becoming the eighth person to be allowed to study for a Ph.D without first receiving a BA or B.Sc. Once she obtained her Ph.D in 1965, Goodall once again returned to the Gombe Sream National Park, where she continued her work studying the Kasakela chimpanzee community. Without having collegiate training, she was able to observe things that many scientific doctrines overlooked. She gave all the chimpanzees names rather than numbers, and recognized their specific personality traits. She observed human interactions like hugs, kisses, and tickling. Her findings suggested that humans and chimpanzees have similarities in more than just genes, but in the fact that they too have emotion, intelligence, and relationships with their surrounding family and friends. Her studies were great for the scientific community, but they are best known for challenging the long-standing belief that only humans were able to construct and use tools. After staying with the apes long enough, she was able to witness them constructing different uses for things like branches and even grass. Humans had long distinguished itself from the Animal Kingdom as “Man the Toolmaker” so, as Louis Leakey wrote, “[Man] must now redefine man, redefine tool, or accept chimpanzees as human!”

Jane Goodall has had a very active personal life as well. She has been married twice, first to a wildlife photographer named Baron van Lawick in 1964, with whom she had a son, Hugo Eric Louis. However, the couple divorced in 1974, and the next year she married a member of Tanzania’s parliament Derek Bryceson. Unfortunately, he died of cancer in 1980. Goodall created the Jane Goodall Institute, which works to make a difference in the lives of all living things, and to help people have the knowledge and power to make a difference in their own communities. She has earned many awards, including the Graham J. Norton Award, Disney’s Animal Kingdom Eco Hero Award, and the Benjamin Franklin Medal in Life Science.

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Jane Goodall: Animal Planet: Chimps, Chimpanzees

Jane Goodall: Animal Planet: Chimps, Chimpanzees | Jane Goodall | Scoop.it
Welcome to Jane Goodall's home at Animal Planet. This is where you can learn more about Jane's extaordinaryobservation adventure and meet the legendary chimpanzees of Gombe.
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This is a Animal Planet's section dedicated to the work of Jane Goodall. Here you can learn all about what she did from a third party source.

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Jane Goodall: What separates us from chimpanzees?

http://www.ted.com Jane Goodall hasn't found the missing link, but she's come closer than nearly anyone else. The primatologist says the only real difference...
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This video is a Ted Talk that Jane Goodall gives. She talks about how, although she hasn't found the missing link, she is closer than anyone else has ever been. 

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The Jane Goodall Institute

The Jane Goodall Institute | Jane Goodall | Scoop.it
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The Jane Goodall Institute was founded by Goodall herself in 1977.  The institue was designed to help preserve and understand the great apes across the globe.  Yet the Jane Goodall Institute's actions are not specific to work with the great apes.  The institute works with communities throughout Africa and the rest of the world to help people gain awareness and understanding of the great apes and what we can do to aid them and better our environment.  Jane Goodall hopes to educate young people, specifically in Africa, about the great apes so that can be nourished and protected for generations to come.  Lately, the institute's work has been focused on conservation for the great ape's habitat.  With deforestation becoming more and more common, many chimpanzee's are being ridded of their homes.  With this issue becoming rapant, Goodall decided to create the institute's sanctuary program.  This program was specifically made for orphaned, young chimpanzees.  The idea behind this institute was to better life for all living things in our world.  

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Video -- Jane Goodall: A Retrospective -- National Geographic

Video -- Jane Goodall: A Retrospective -- National Geographic | Jane Goodall | Scoop.it
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This video shows Goodall's journey into Gombe Stream National Park, Tanzania.  Goodall went into Tanzania without the formal, college education on anthropology, and came out to educate the world on chimpanzees in ways no one in the past ever had.  

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Meet Robert Ballard, James Cameron, Jane Goodall, and Explorers Around the World

Meet Robert Ballard, James Cameron, Jane Goodall, and Explorers Around the World | Jane Goodall | Scoop.it
Join some of National Geographic's biggest names in exploration and innovation Sunday, January 13th for our most epic Google+ Hangout to date.
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January 13th, join Jane Goodall, James Cameron, and a varierty of others in a Google+ hangout of epic proportions. 

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Works Cited

Bender, Kristin. "Goodall Promotes Peace, Youth Empowerment at Talk in 
     Berkeley." Oakland Tribune. Oakland Tribune, 10 Oct. 2009. Web. 10 Jan. 
     2013. <http://www.insidebayarea.com/crime-courts/ ;
     ci_13473075?source=rss>. 

 

"Gombe Timeline." Jane Goodall Institute. Jane Goodall Institute, 2005. Web. 10 
     Jan. 2013. <http://www.janegoodall.org/study-corner-gombe-timeline>. ;

 

Goodall, Jane. Beyond Innocence. Wilmington: Mariner Book, 2002. Print. 

 

"Goodall's Wild Chimpanzees." PBS. Educational Broadcasting Corporation, Mar. 
     1996. Web. 10 Jan. 2013. <http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/episodes/ ;
     jane-goodalls-wild-chimpanzees/introduction/1908/>. 

 

Harvey, Jo. "Me Jane: The Real Queen of the Jungle." The Times. Times Newspaper, 
     6 Jan. 2011. Web. 9 Jan. 2013. <http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/science/ ;
     eureka/article2862635.ece>. 

 

Quammen, David. "Jane in the Forest Again." National Geographic. National 
     Geographic Society, Apr. 2003. Web. 10 Jan. 2013. 
     <http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/0304/feature5/fulltext.html>. ;

 

Walker, Tim. "Is Jane Goodall about to Lose Her Post." The Telegraph. Telegraph 
     Media Group, 23 May 2008. Web. 10 Jan. 2013. <http://www.telegraph.co.uk/ ;
     news/celebritynews/2011241/Is-Jane-Goodall-about-to-lose-her-post.html>. 

 

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Jane Goodall's Roots & Shoots

Jane Goodall's Roots & Shoots | Jane Goodall | Scoop.it
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Jane Goodall's Roots and Shoots program was created by Jane Goodall to engage young people in improving their environment and learning about the world around them.  The Roots and Shoots program helps young people learn about different cultures and ethnic groups and how they can all come together to make a better world.  The website has this posted as their philosophy: "Our philosophy is based on the belief that every individual matters, every individual has a role to play and every individual makes a difference. This core idea is at the root of Dr. Jane Goodall's philosophy."Jane Goodall always took interest in the world around her and how she could benefit it.  Through Roots and Shoots, Goodall could educate young people with her philosophy and hopefully create a generation who thinks similarly about the treatment of all living things. 

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United Nations Messengers of Peace

United Nations Messengers of Peace | Jane Goodall | Scoop.it
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The United Nations Messenger of Peace is an honor and responsibility given to prominent characters and personalities who have accomplished great feats in bettering the world.  Messengers are appointed for an initial period of two years, but can continue as a messenger if they please.  Jane Goodall was honored with this responsiblity after the United Nations acknowledged her achievements in teaching the world about chimpanzees, creating the Jane Goodall Institute and the Roots and Shoots Programme. Although this award in generally supposed to be given to people in the field of arts, literature, music or sports, Goodall was selected for being a world renowned anthropologist.  Goodall also has pushed to United Nations to take interest and assist in environmental issues, such as the UNEP/UNESCO Great Apes Survival Project to help perserve Great Apes.  

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