James' Year 9 Journal
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Teenage baby boom sparks call for better sex education

Teenage baby boom sparks call for better sex education | James' Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
The number of teenage mothers has jumped after decades of steady decline and NSW has had the most significant increase.
James Cooper's insight:

This article outlines the fact that despite consistent and sustained decrease in rates over the prior 10 years, and even though the trend was expected to continue in some capacity at least, 2010 showed a spike increase in the number of teen pregnancies, with a startling 10% increase between the previous year. There would also be other associated issues with unprotected sex at play here, particularly relating to sexually transmitted infections. This also brings into play other ethical issues. Over half of under 16 pregnancies in Australia end in abortion, and over 60 percent of those under 18 do not have a male partner at the time of pregnancy. The main issue for education would be in targeting specific areas. Data from NSW Health shows that the highest rates of teen pregnancies are in rural and lower socio economic areas, with 2% of under 18 pregnancies in NSW coming from the Illawarra region. As of 2014, the rate has not changed significantly and is still around 17 per 1000 births. Statistics like this show that we need to further ensure that good sex education is given to teens, and that support is made clear and available if needed. 

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Teenage boy dies in north Queensland gym

Teenage boy dies in north Queensland gym | James' Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
A 15-year-old boy who was exercising at a north Queensland gym has died suddenly.
James Cooper's insight:

This article tells the sad story of a teenager who died while exercising at a gym. He was feeling unwell, yet proceeded to exercise, thus agitating the symptoms when he collapsed and stopped breathing, being pronounced dead later in the day. This article links to issues of health, social pressures and body image. This boy died because he was working out an exerted too much, if he had remained home, his symptoms would not have been increased by his physical exertion. If a teenager facing social pressure or pressure from themselves due to the way they are or the way others are was to be put in the same position, the same potentially devastating effects may arise. This article reminds us that it is important to factor in other elements when making decisions, such as intense exercise and how dedicated we are to an activity. It is not uncommon in sports for athletes to experience the same thing, an unwell feeling which is made worse by intense exercise resulting in death. 

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Kids detained in CBD anti-drink blitz

Kids detained in CBD anti-drink blitz | James' Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
Police say some parents have refused to pick up their children after they were detained in a blitz on underage drinking in the CBD.
James Cooper's insight:

This article talks of an event in 2011 where a group of people aged between 13 and 17 were caught across various Sydney city hotspots consuming alcohol illegally and were taken into police custody by NSW Police and Department of Community Services workers. In total, 10 boys and 10 girls were arrested, with 10 parents refusing to pick them up, leaving them in the custody of police. Eventually three of them had to be taken to a youth refuge. The article highlights the problem of underage drinking and points out that it does not only occur in the home or at parties, but also in public areas, and it can be concluded that this means younger people are not excluded from these gatherings. On the positive side, it means that police and DOCS are able to do something about underage drinking, with this event proving that they are able to uphold some level of control in public, and this is a good way to discourage and prevent the undesirable behaviour from spreading.

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Teenage STI rate has plummeted since vaccine

Teenage STI rate has plummeted since vaccine | James' Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
The incidence of genital warts among teenage girls has plunged since schools introduced the human papillomavirus vaccination program.
James Cooper's insight:

This article details positive results regarding the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination program rolled out across schools and in practice since 2007. The results have shown that since the vaccination had started to be offered, with a 90% reduction in genital warts infections in 13-17 year olds and a 73% drop in 18-26 year olds, (including some of those who were vaccinated in high school and have since finished). There were also positive signs in males, with a 38% drop even before the vaccine was offered in schools to them. This is a positive sign as this is a common and incurable nuisance of a disease, and while with treatment all it becomes is a nuisance, the fact that symptoms can reappear at any time means that it is incurable and therefore the best way to attack the disease and reduce its impacts is through vaccination. This news article shows that vaccination is effective in reducing infection and spread and that this trend then does continue into the future, meaning that sexually active people will have a better quality of life overall due to the lower chance of being infected.

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Underage smoking 'should be illegal'

Underage smoking 'should be illegal' | James' Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
Underage smoking should be an offence like underage drinking, says the peak body for corner stores and petrol stations.
James Cooper's insight:

This article points out the common misconception that smoking is illegal for those under 18, when in fact, it is only illegal for those under 18 to purchase cigarettes. It tells of the Australasian Association of Convenience Stores (AACS)'s concern of the impacts this is having on the health of youth and believe that under 18s smoking should be illegal as is the case for drinking and should be enforced as such. Currently there is no legal allowance for punishment to be imposed on underage smokers, and approximately 70000 youth start smoking every year across Australia. Counter reports tell of the concept that introducing a law may encourage smoking in those with rebellious tendencies. The final point is one that makes sense, as those who are rebellious tend to look at alcohol as a positive thing already (though potentially grow out of it), however, if smoking was the next popular rebellious choice, it would be more difficult for those affected to 'grow out of it' as nicotine is a highly addictive substance. That being said, I do not believe that smoking should be legal for under 18s and I believe that measures put in place by Tasmania and Singapore such as no cigarettes to those born after 2000 would be an effective method to slowly phase out cigarette use.

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Fines for minors who enter pubs and clubs

Fines for minors who enter pubs and clubs | James' Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
UNDERAGE drinkers and their parents would be fined up to $1000 for attempting to enter licensed premises or even setting foot inside bottle shops under radical proposals by the state's pubs and clubs.
James Cooper's insight:

This article talks about potential fines that could be introduced based on proposals put forward by pubs and clubs. This would allow parents and minors or minors entering pubs or bottle shops to be fined up to $1000 and make it a crime. This article is effective in its message due to the rational points put forward by the representatives of the pubs and clubs. However, the council for civil liberties states that a more effective way to execute this would be to create a 'deterrent' in order to discourage entry in the first place, however, fail to provide an example of what a deterrent would be. However, as the Council for Civil Liberties says, I agree that perhaps $1000 fines for entering (this is where the point of crime would be, entering, not browsing, holding, using, buying or attempting to buy) are a bit excessive and that more focus should be given to prevention of consumption, and not focused on stopping entry into bottle shops.

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