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The Comedy of the Lovers in A Midsummer Night's Dream (Literary Criticism)

The Comedy of the Lovers in A Midsummer Night's Dream (Literary Criticism) | Jack's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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LITERARY CRITICISM:

Many different lenses can be used to view different pieces of work. In this literary criticism M.E. Comtois views the four young lovers differently than most people these days see them. Instead of viewing them each as individuals, she views the group as a whole. They are one of the three groups in A Midsummer Night’s Dream; the other two groups are the tradesmen and the fairies. Most people would see the group of lovers as the group that provides the heartfelt romance to the play, Comtois interpreted their role differently. She saw them as another group to add comedic value to the play. The way that they are objectified by the adults as well as the ridiculous circumstances surrounding their love because of the fairies interfering all adds humor to the play. Comtois argues that their presence in the play was supposed to add just as much comedy as the group of tradesmen. This argument is completely valid and is backed by strong evidence from the text of A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

 

Comtois, M. E. "The Comedy Of The Lovers In A Midsummer Night's Dream." Essays In Literature 12.1 (1985): 15-25. Literary Reference Center. Web. 6 Mar. 2013.

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Arthur Brooke and the Lost Play Of Romeo And Juliet (Source)

Arthur Brooke and the Lost Play Of Romeo And Juliet (Source) | Jack's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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SOURCE:

It is very well known that much of Shakespeare’s work is not completely original. He had many sources when writing his plays. This includes even his most well known and recognized play, Romeo and Juliet. The inspiration for Romeo and Juliet is undeniably The Tragicall Historye of Romeus and Juliet, a narrative poem written by Arthur Brooke. Aside from having a very similar name for the main characters, the orders of events that occur in both pieces are almost exactly the same. Furthermore, there are forty-four cases within Romeo and Juliet where Shakespeare either paraphrased or directly quoted The Tragicall Historye of Romeus and Juliet. Some scholars believe that there is another layer to the source though. There is some belief that both Shakespeare and Brooke both took the idea of Romeo/Romeus and Juliet from yet another writer’s work. This speculation comes from a line out of Brooks poem suggesting that the idea of his poem comes from another play, however many now believe that it was only the moral of the story of Romeus and Juliet that Brooke saw portrayed on stage earlier.

 

Stacy, Gerald. "Arthur Brooke And The Lost Play Of Romeo And Juliet."English Studies 58.2 (1977): 110. Literary Reference Center. Web. 6 Mar. 2013.

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Gender Roles of Women in the Renaissance (Historical Article)

Gender Roles of Women in the Renaissance (Historical Article) | Jack's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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HISTORICAL ARTICLE:

Although the time of the Renaissance was also a time of queens ruling over the land of England, the role of women during this era was less than desirable for them. The ideal woman at this time was rarely seen and never heard in public. Women of the lower class were supposed to be housewives. Working class women had to work with their spouse and help them run their business as well as maintain the house hold. Upper class women, even those with a large number of servants, were still expected to take care of the house. Single women had to live with a male relative or become a nun; they could not live alone. Single women were also treated as property, just as Hermia was in A Midsummer Night’s Dream. They were controlled by their parents until they married, at that point they are now essentially the property of their husband. This can be seen when Egeus tries to force Hermia to marry Demetrius. Shakespeare also uses women that are shrews, which do not fit in to the requirements of an ideal woman. Helena is an example of a shrew. She is very outspoken and this is probably a big part of why Demetrius does not like her at all.

 

Cloud, Amanda. "Gender Roles of Women in the Renaissance." Gender Roles of Women in the Renaissance. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2013.

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Love & The Supernatural (Image)

Love & The Supernatural (Image) | Jack's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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IMAGE:

This picture shows the fairies interference with the mortals in mythology. The circumstance depicted is the kind that would occur when fairies like Oberon and Puck try to change how mortals feel towards one another. In the painting it is clear that the man is about to place a ring on the woman’s finger, likely symbolizing marriage or some relationship commitment. The people however do not appear to be in love. They do not even seem aware of what they are doing. They are under the spell of the fairy in the middle. The fairy has an almost evil look on its face because it is happily bending the will of those mortals. This is probably what the marriage of Lysander and Helena would have looked like if Puck had also made Helena fall in love in the middle of the forest after enchanting Lysander.

 

"Google Images." Google Images. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2013.

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Insults by Shakespeare - April Gudenrath (Video)

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/insults-by-shakespeare "You're a fishmonger!" By taking a closer look at Shakespeare's words--specifically his in...
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VIDEO 3:00-4:33:

This video is an explanation of some of Shakespeare’s language, mainly his insults. Tips on how to recognize when insults are being used, even if you do not know what the insult means, are included. Knowing when charachters are using insults allows for a better understanding of the charachters as well as the mood of a particular scene. Examples and descriptions of some insults from a few of Shakespeare’s plays including Hamlet as well as Romeo and Juliet are also included. A lot of Shakespeare’s language is very confusing to students and insults are a major comedic factor in many of his plays. This video therefore is both helpful in aiding in understanding some of the language used as well as entertaining because the insults themselves are funny.

 

"Insults by Shakespeare - April Gudenrath." YouTube. YouTube, 04 May 2012. Web. 06 Mar. 2013.

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