italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures
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italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures
What I love most and miss about my country: regional culinary excellence and art masterpieces
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To the Centre of the Earth, Series 3, Italy Unpacked - BBC Two

To the Centre of the Earth, Series 3, Italy Unpacked - BBC Two | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it
Andrew Graham-Dixon and Giorgio Locatelli visit the regions of Le Marche and Umbria.

Via Mariano Pallottini, B&B Terra Mossa
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A lovely portrait of Le Marche

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HolidayinMarche's curator insight, March 4, 2015 9:03 AM

See it online now (19 days left to watch)

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The "Annunciation" painted by Giovanni Santi, Raphael's father

The "Annunciation" painted  by Giovanni Santi, Raphael's father | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it
I am quite a fan of “dear old Mr Santi”, as the art historian Kenneth Clark described him, so I was keen to go and see this picture on display in Senigallia as part of the exhibition “La Grazie e la Luce” (Grace and Light). [...]
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How the world went nuts for a hazelnut spread

How the world went nuts for a hazelnut spread | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it
Last year some 365 million kilos of Nutella was consumed in 160 countries. Half a century ago, in a small town in northern Italy, this would have been unimaginable.
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la storia della nutella ..yummy

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The Marche on The Spectator | It's always meant to be the next Tuscany. It's still blessedly quiet

The Marche  on The Spectator | It's always meant to be the next Tuscany. It's still blessedly quiet | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it

When I first visited the Marche a dozen years ago, folk who knew about such things tapped their noses and confidently predicted that it was to be Italy’s ‘next big thing’. The British would tire of Tuscany and Umbria, they said, and would head in Boden-clad hordes further east. They said exactly the same thing when I returned five years later and yet again more recently.
The invasion has yet to happen. Few of the top travel companies push or promote the Marche and the Brits have stayed wedded to Chiantishire. I really can’t understand why.
After all, the Marche has everything that Tuscany and Umbria have. There are handsome medieval walled towns and enchanting hilltop villages complete with — so the Marchigiani like to boast — 500 squares, 106 castles, 37 fortresses and 15 strongholds; there are the remarkable Frasassi caves; there are the rugged Apennines on one side, with the cobalt-blue Adriatic on the other; there are secluded sandy beaches and the myriad islands of Croatia are only a few hours’ sail away; there is great food and great wine. I mean, what’s not to like?[...]


Via Mariano Pallottini, B&B Terra Mossa
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Mariano Pallottini's curator insight, February 13, 2014 11:46 AM

This article first appeared in the print edition of The Spectator magazine, dated 15 February 2014

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Italian Pasta

Whatever the woes of the Italian economy, the country still has immense pride in its cuisine. So much so in fact that an academy of cuisine in Parma has issued a list of rules for those who are unfortunate enough not to have been born in Italy.
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Audioclip in English providing an insight into italian regional cuisine and finally demolishing the SPGHETTI BOLOGNESE legend!
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Making Ravioli with Chef Josh Campbell

making ravioli with chef josh campbell of mayberr's in cincinnati with full recipes.
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Step by step recipe in English clear and with useful pics
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How to Make a Colomba, a Traditional Italian Easter Cake

Surprise and delight your friends and family this Easter with a traditional Italian treat — colomba! "Colomba" means "dove" and is an important Catholic symbol. Follow this step-by-step guide and you'll have the aromas of Italy filing up your kitchen in no time! Thanks to Simona of Walks of Italy for letting us use her kitchen, and showing her family recipe. Buona Pasqua! (Happy Easter!)


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Coffee time in Italy? Here’s a quick guide

Coffee time in Italy? Here’s a quick guide | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it

No matter where you go you’ll always find coffee: italians can’t live without it. Whether you’re visiting a small town or a major city you’ll always find a bar around the corner. In Italy any time is good for “un buon caffè” and the favourite kind is without doubt the espresso: 25 ml of water that flows through 7 g of freshly grinded coffee in 25 seconds, at a pressure of 9 bars.

[Read the article to discover]

"Un Caffè” is an espresso“Caffè Americano”“Caffè lungo”“Cappuccino"“Caffè macchiato”“Latte macchiato”“Marocchino""Caffè shakerato"


Via Mariano Pallottini, Cecilia Negri
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Bernardo López Bosque's curator insight, June 19, 2013 3:45 AM

Une pause Café toujours un grand plaisir si de plus c¡est Made in Italy ..

Appassionata's curator insight, June 19, 2013 3:53 AM

Excellent article about the differnet types of Italian coffee.......

Pepi Cobos Brenes's comment, June 21, 2013 9:52 AM
UHmmmmm! a esta hora de la tarde... te lo acepto encantada!!
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How to make Cappelletti

How to make Cappelletti | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it

“Cappelletti”, literally small hats, a type of stuffed pasta dumplings usually served in chicken broth during winter and a MUST of the Christmas meal. This type of pasta is a central Italian speciality , mainly from Emilia-Romagna and Le Marche, and it predates the most widely famously shaped tortellini.
Let’s go back to the pasta dough sitting cling-filmed in a bowl. As we all know the pasta has to rest for at least an hour in the fridge
Well if you want to make cappelletti just wait in the kitchen and prepare the filling for the cappelletti.
Filling for 6 servings in a bowl mix

Ingredients:

250gr beef mince250gr pork mince100gr Parmesan100gr buttersalt and pepper1/2 spoon of cinnamon1 egg yolk1/2 spoon of nutmeglemon peelDirection
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Brodetto for Christmas | An Italian Christmas Eve Dinner: Feast of the 7 Fishes

Brodetto for Christmas | An Italian Christmas Eve Dinner: Feast of the 7 Fishes | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it

The idea of having all types of fish is paramount for the Feast of the Seven Fishes on Christmas Eve — which is why my recipe from newly released cookbook Classico e Moderno is so fitting. The Brodetto di Pesce or Adriatic Style Fish Stew contains shellfish, fish and fish stock in one bowl and is incredibly warming for a cold winter night and extra luxurious for the holidays.
This seafood stew combines a hodgepodge of finfish and shellfish. (The word brodetto means “short broth,” a reference to the quick stock traditionally made from the shrimp shells and fish bones, but this recipe calls for an already-prepared stock in- stead.) You can by all means vary the selection and proportions of seafood, but including a mix is essential to producing a complex broth that results in an alluring effect that I think of as a “symphony of the sea.”

Brodetto di Pesce, Adriatic-styl Seafood Stew
Ingredients - Serves 10-12

2 tablespoons olive oil2 large garlic cloves, minced1 bay leaf, preferably fresh1 Spanish onion, thinly sliced2 large beefsteak tomatoes, cut into small dice, or 1 28-ounce can whole tomatoes, preferably Italian San Marzano or organic, crushed by hand, with their juice 5 basil sprigs, 1 left whole, leaves removed from the remaining 4 and cut into chiffonade Pinch of red pepper flakes1 cup dry white wineSeafood Stock 2 pounds firm white-fleshed fish fillets, such as monkfish, sea bass, or snapper, cut into 1½-inch cubesKosher saltFreshly ground black pepperAll-purpose flour, for dusting2 tablespoons canola oil1 pound sea scallops1 pound large shrimp1 pound mussels, preferably Prince Edward Island, scrubbed and debearded1 pound clams, such as Manila or cherrystone, scrubbed¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons thinly sliced fresh flat-leaf parsley leavesExtra virgin olive oil, for drizzling10 to 12 slices fettunta (see page 11;1 slice per serving)Directions
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Ancona Day Trip - Asgeir Pedersen Foto

Ancona Day Trip - Asgeir Pedersen Foto | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it

Ancona is the regional capital of Le Marche with a population of about 103.000. It was founded around 400BC by Greek settlers from Syracusa in Sicily. The name is derived from the Greek language meaning “elbow” after the shape of the promontory to the north of the harbor. Ancona is an important port city, especially for passenger traffic to and from the other side of the Adriatic Sea and from Greece and the Orient. It is an industrial and service center with a big marine fishing fleet. The Maritime Fishing Research Institute and the National Association of Sea Fishing Cities are situated in Ancona and it also hosts the International Fishing Trade Fair.
The following is an intro to some of the highlights in Ancona, all within walking distance from the train station and the port.

Piazza del Papa [...]Piazza del Plebescito [...]Clemente XII [...]Chiesa di San Francesco alle Scale  [...]Assumption altarpiece by Lorenzo Lotto  [...]Lunch at Enopolis Restaurant  [...]Cattedrale di San Ciriaco – Saint Cyriacus  [...]
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Olive All’Ascolana | Serious Party Food

Olive All’Ascolana  | Serious Party Food | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it

Ingredients

400 Grams Large Pitted Green Olives150 Grams Very Finely Ground Beef (Minced 4 Times)4 Tbsp Breadcrumbs4 Tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil1 EggExtra Bread Crumbs for CoatingA Little Flour for CoatingDirections
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Discover Macerata in Le Marche

Discover Macerata in Le Marche | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it
The city is famous for being the birth place of Matteo Ricci, a 17th century humanist and mathematician. Ricci was the first Westerner to visit Beijing in 1601, and would go on to translate various classics like Cicero and Euclid into Chinese. Macerata is a fairly wealthy city, whose economy is mostly based on agriculture. If you're in town, there are a few places you should visit. You should start with the Church of Santa Maria della Misericordia, [...]
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Rosso Piceno: real treasure of Le Marche

Rosso Piceno: real treasure of Le Marche | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it
The variety of grapes found in Southern Italy paired with the regional attachment to tradition, offers consumers real choice and true variety in a world increasingly devoid of the same. The adoption of modern cellar protocols should not be mistaken for the abandonment of tradition here as these wines still, for the most part, speak clearly of their origins. Perhaps more clearly and distinctly than ever before, and at this price point that is not only a discovery, but a true treasure! Along with Rosso Conero, the mainstay wines of the Marche in Central Italy, though different in their compositions with Rosso Piceno containing between 35% and 85% Montepulciano d’Abruzzo blended with between 15% and 50% Sangiovese, allowing for the additional inclusion of other black skinned varieties allowed in the region. On the other hand Rosso Conero is a minimum of 85% Montepulciano d’Abruzzo blended with Sangiovese. In both cases the Sangiovese is used to add red fruit and lighten the texture of the grapey, rich and slightly chewy Montepulciano, resulting in complex, fresh and yet deep wines that have plenty of fruit that tends to be paired with modest, ripe fruit tannins. The influence of new oak is popular with these wines.
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"Madonna mia!" Discover Rome's Not-So-Hidden Treasure

"Madonna mia!" Discover Rome's Not-So-Hidden Treasure | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it
Words and pictures by Nicola Ferlei Brown 'Madonnelle stradarole', miniature Madonnas, are a form of popular devotion in Rome.
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Nice article about one of many Rome's hidden treasures
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Le Marche on ITALIA Magazine: holidays, property, food, wine, Culture, People

Le Marche on ITALIA Magazine: holidays, property, food, wine, Culture, People | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it

Escape the January grey skies to the shores of Italy, with inspiration and ideas for your next Italian getaway in the new issue of Italia magazine. Property-wise we are mad for Le Marche, and with Fleur Kinson’s guide to getting the most for your money in this stunning region, you’d be mad to miss it too! Whether you are interested in restoration or finished properties, it’s easy to see the best of what is available in issue 111 of Italia. If you are thinking of relocating, you’ll find tips and advice from those in the know on what to look our for and consider when making the move to Italy.


Via Mariano Pallottini, B&B Terra Mossa
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Quanti Pani!

Quanti Pani! | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it
Writing about traditional pane (bread) in a previous article made me realise just how many different variations we actually have here in Italy. Let’s have a l
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An interesting post outlining different types of Italian breads
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Iesi (Jesi in Italian): The City of a Holy Emperor and Divine Wine

Iesi (Jesi in Italian): The City of a Holy Emperor and Divine Wine | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it

The old centre of Iesi is surrounded by fortified walls that were build in the 14th century to replace the Roman ones.  The famous white wine in this area is, of course, the fantastic Verdecchio dei Castelli di Jesi. The best place to taste the local wines is the Regional wine cellar (Enoteca Regionale di Jesi) situated in the Baroque palace of Balleani.  The legend has it that Frederick II, the most powerful Holy Roman Emperor of the Middle Ages, was born in the public square, now named after him. [...]


Via Mariano Pallottini
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Nice piece on Jesi highlighting historic background and providing a useful description of town. Not to forget a visit to the little gem BIBLIOTECA PLANETTIANA, you can book a guided tour with an enthusiastic member of staff with great knowledge who will show you around and show fantastic  and fascinating old books and maps.

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Mariano Pallottini's curator insight, January 15, 2014 12:38 PM

Accommodation

La Locanda del Golf - Farm Holiday - www

Federico II - Hotel - www

L'Orchidea - Restaurant - www

Activities

Scuola Sibilla - Climbing, Ski and Snoboarding - www

Italcook - Cookery School - www

Noir Club - DiscoDinner - www

Club Scherma - Fencing - www

Campo Pratica Golf - Golf - www

Museo Archeologico e del territorio di San Floriano - Museum

Museo Diocesano - Museum

Pinacoteca e Musei Civici - Museum

Studio per le Arti della Stampa - Museum

Teatro G.B.Pergolesi - Theatre

Teatro Studio V.Moriconi - Theatre

Assivip - L'enoteca di Jesi - Wine Tasting - www

Shopping

Caseificio Piandelmedico - Cheeses - www

Cooperlat - Cheeses - www

Plebani Furniturewww

Fattorie Donzelli - Salamis - www

Salumi Tomassoni - Salamis - www

Cioccolato di BruCo - Typical Products - www

Montecappone - Wines - www

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La colazione migliore è quella italiana: calcio, carboidrati e pochi grassi

La colazione migliore è  quella italiana: calcio,  carboidrati e pochi grassi | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it

Non ci sono combinazioni anglosassoni, statunitensi o 'continentali' che tengano: la colazione all'italiana è la...

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Christmas in Le Marche

Christmas in Le Marche | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it

Christmas in Le Marche is always been traditional since the time Emperor Aurelian decreed in 274 A.D that the Nativity Feast should take place on 25 December to coincide with the pagan festivals surrounding the Winter Solstice.

The first nativity scene decorated the village of Greccio, 80km east of Rome and synonymous with 25 December celebrations throughout Italy. In 1223 Giovanni Vellita created one in Le Marche at the behest of St Francis of Assisi who held a mass in front of the nativity scene which established it as the holy symbol of Christmas.

The traditional Christmas in Italy revolves around the church, religious festivals, families and feasting. Indeed no festival is ever complete without the element of food. The Christmas season starts with La Vigilia (the vigil) on the 24 December and finishes with L’Epifania (the Epiphany) on 6th January, it encompasses Natale (Christmas) on the 25th, San Stefano (St Stephens) on the 26th, San Silvestro on New Year’s Eve and Capodanno on New years Day.

In Le Marche, La Vigilia on 24th December has an equal importance to Christmas, and is celebrated with a huge feast of at least 7 courses that usually includes fish. A typical Vigila dinner begins with antipasti of different fish dishes such as smoked salmon, lumache (snails in a tomato sauce), seafood and marinated anchovies.

The first course, primo piatto, consists of pasta or risotto with a fish sauce. Fish is also unmissable for the secondo (second dish). In relation with the territory around Le Marche, the family choose the fish of the tradition: baked trout, langoustines, stoccafisso (stockfish) or baccalá (dried salt-cured cod), eels, red mullet, or, fried whitebait. As traditional contorno (side dish), bitter greens such as Cicoria, especially sauted with oil and garlic represent a perfect choice for Le Marche Christmas Vigilia. In alternative there are seasonal vegetables or contorni such as Roast Fennel or Globe artichokes. As conclusion the unmissable sweet specialities such as torrone (nougat), panettone, pandoro, and exotic fruits plus a glass of Vino Cotto, a smoky flavour, sweet wine originates in Roman times.

Most locals go to mass at midnight to pray, sing carols and celebrate the birth of Jesus. This heart warming night is concluded with socialising, hugging and kissing as friends and neighbours exchange greetings and toast each other in the Piazza of the Church with a local wine or a warming punch, mulled wine or vin brule.

Christmas Day starts slowly and noisy as children wake to open the Christmas Gifts, conscious to have a better second chance with the witch delivery the day of La Befana, the epiphany (6th of Jannuary). All the family, with relatives from other towns, is now around the table for the Christmas lunch. Gorgeous anti pasti of cold meats, cheeses, pickled vegetables etc. give only an idea of the large meal that will follow. The first course is something "in brodo" (in broth) such as meat cappelletti or wild mushroom filled tortellini and then something baked "al forno", such as vincisgrassi, the famous Le Marche lasagna made with Chicken livers or Cannelloni, . For the main course, there is a range of meats cooked al forno or grilled "alla brace" on an open fire and even fried. Typically le Marche style is the great variety of meat used: leg of lamb, stinco (pork), and chicken, stuffed olives Ascolana Style. The main course is usually accompanied by side plates of roast potatoes and other seasonal vegetables, winter salad leaves. Then again the sweet specialities such as torrone, panettone, pandoro and, if the relatives were generous: Panforte di Siena, Cantuccini, Saporelli...

 

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Italian Caffè: We Cannot Live Without

Italian Caffè: We Cannot Live Without | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it
This is another ingredient of the Italian DNA. One of those basic aspects of our life that can't be changed and that makes us feeling nostalgic when we are abroad. A CAFFÉ represents the beginning...

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Giacomo Leopardi Speaks English

Giacomo Leopardi Speaks English | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it

The first complete English version of Giacomo Leopardi’s manuscript, “Zibaldone,” was presented at the Italian Cultural Institute in New York.


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Mariano Pallottini's curator insight, December 10, 2013 2:55 PM

A collection of Leopardi’s annotations and literary, critical and philosophical reflections that the author makes in response to his readings. This literary masterpiece also includes comments that touch a wide range of fields of different nature including linguistics, history, anthropology, astronomy and psychology, showing the enormous intellectual stature of the Italian poet. 

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One of the 7 Fishes on an Italian Christmas Eve: Baccalà - Salt Cod

One of the 7 Fishes on an Italian Christmas Eve: Baccalà - Salt Cod | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it

Ingredients

300 g salt cod3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil1 medium, peeled and finely chopped onion1 piece dried chilli4-5 tinned plum tomatoes8 pitted, semi-dried prunesparsleyDirections
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Mariano Pallottini's curator insight, December 19, 2013 12:13 PM

Dry salted cod/baccala fish . This fish will have tobe soaked in water and then changed out many times in a 72 hour period (or less), checking and changing out the water until it is clear. If it's not  clear, continue to change out water several more times during the day until the water is completely clear.

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Cappelletti in brodo: The king of the table at Christmas in Le Marche

Cappelletti in brodo: The king of the table at Christmas in Le Marche | italy and my region: a culinary and art journey into my country's treasures | Scoop.it

Every region of Italy has a special dish that is made for Christmas and in Le Marche this plate would be i cappelletti. It is the king of the table on Christmas day.
The word “cappelletto” means “little hat” and it is what the pasta looks like. The cappelletti are a well loved tradition and for years they are prepared at home by the whole family so that they can be ready for the Christmas lunch on the 25 of December. They are “the cousins” to tortellini and are filled with meats, like mortadella and parmigiano with a dash of nutmeg. They are served with broth made from capons or they can be served with a cream sauce. [...]


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