ItalianNeorealism
33 views | +0 today
Follow
ItalianNeorealism
Italian Neorealism is a film movement in Italy that came about as World War II and Mussolini's government ended.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Simeon Stoyanov from Italian Neorealism (1945-1951)
Scoop.it!

Ossessione (1943)

Visconti's Ossessione (1943) is usually considered as the very first neorealism film, mostly because the critics that it was going to be something original. Basically stole Cain's novel and used it to make the film more omniscient and objective camera style like. The movie was banned by Mussolini's government for its subject matter.


Via Ryan Schad
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Simeon Stoyanov from The Italian Neorealism and Spaghetti Westerns
Scoop.it!

Central Stylistic Characteristics

Central Stylistic Characteristics | ItalianNeorealism | Scoop.it

Italian Neorealism came about in Italy due to a once in a lifetime type moment.  It was kind of a juxtaposition where the end of WWII, Benito Mussolini's government collapse, and where the film industry was at the moment. Since all of the film studios were destroyed during the war, film crews had to go out and film the movies on spot. In addition, the economy was pretty bad so they did not even hire professional actors. Most importantly the Italian Neorealism movement provided information on the daily life of ordinary citizens in Italy, something that no other film movement has ever shown.


Via Izabel Marinova
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Simeon Stoyanov
Scoop.it!

Sciuscia (1946)

Sciuscia (1946) | ItalianNeorealism | Scoop.it

Shoeshine (1946) was the first major film that Vittorio de Sica directed in his academy award filled career. In this movie you still see that theme of the struggling life for adults after the war, but in this case you see it from the childern's perspective. Giuseppe and Pasquale the main protagonists in the movie are kids that own a shoeshining business but can't make enough money to buy a horse.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Simeon Stoyanov from The Italian Neorealism and Spaghetti Westerns
Scoop.it!

Andreotti's Law | Italian Neo-Realism

Andreotti's Law | Italian Neo-Realism | ItalianNeorealism | Scoop.it

Basically happened in the middle of the Italian Neorealist movement in conjunction with the ending of WWII and the death of Benito Mussolini's government in 1943. Led to the downfall of the Neorealist movement because the law was extremely against the movement and it decreased the importation on American films. Also allowed for Italian film producers to create more movies by receiving loans by submitting the script to the government for review.


Via Izabel Marinova
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Simeon Stoyanov from Italian Neorealism: Emotions Everyday Life May Evoke
Scoop.it!

Vittorio de Sica

Vittorio de Sica | ItalianNeorealism | Scoop.it

One of the most influential directors of the Italian Neorealist movement. Directed one of the most popular movie at the time and in modern day, Bicycle Thieves, which was about a father and his son, searching for a bicycle that was vital for the father's job. Other movies that he directed include: The Childern Are Watching Us (1942), Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow (1963), and etc.


Via Italian Neorealism
more...
Italian Neorealism's curator insight, March 15, 2013 12:01 PM

Vittorio de Sica is known for the films Benditi a Orgosolo (Bandits of Orgosolo) 

Bicycle Thieves, Miracle In Milan, and Umberto D.

Bicyle Thieves is arguably his most important and most famous work. Umberto D is regarded as the film that ended the movement. 

Film 2700 Group 's comment, March 17, 2013 9:49 PM
One of the major director's involved with the Italian Neorealist Movement.
Nyisha Jones's curator insight, March 27, 2014 11:27 AM

·         1902 – 1974

·         Considered one of the most influential directors during the movement.

·         He focused on working with nonprofessional actors and fully exploring and understanding the character.

·         His movies worked with the social and political problems during the era.

·         Later on in his years, he worked with comedies.

·         Like Roberto, his work soon also grew less favorable until today.

Scooped by Simeon Stoyanov
Scoop.it!

Suso Cecchi d'Amico obituary

Suso Cecchi d'Amico obituary | ItalianNeorealism | Scoop.it

One of the most well known screenwriters in Italy of all times. Suso collaborated on hundreds of scripts in her lifetime alot of which were in the Neorealism period including: Sica's Bicycle Theives, Wyler's Roman Holiday, and etc. In the Bicycle Thieves Suso did not end the film like the book, but she changed it to where the father and the son go out and search for the bike themselves. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Simeon Stoyanov from The Italian Neorealism and Spaghetti Westerns
Scoop.it!

CESARE ZAVATTINI / History of Neorealism

Zavattini at first studied law, but quickly devoted himself to journalism. He also had an immense influence on the neorealistic movement by going into a partnership with Vittorio de Sica to produce dozens of films that include: Bicycle Thieves (1948), Umberto D. (1952), Shoeshine (1946), and Miracle in Milan (1951). In 1979 Cesare Zavattini was awarded Honorable Prize for the contribution to cinema.


Via Izabel Marinova
more...
MikeVilches's curator insight, April 1, 2013 3:27 PM

Before Italian Westerns were being made the italian cinima was going through. 1945-1951 was Italian Neorealism this dealt with the filming of real life where the themes and philosophy which was to capture the unique individual experience of isolation among other things.  You need to have a grasp of what italian film was before the emergence of Italian Westerns. It can give a clear understanding of how italian cinima implemented and avoided certain themes and ideas that it aquired during its Neoralism era.

Scooped by Simeon Stoyanov
Scoop.it!

Federico Fellini

Federico Fellini | ItalianNeorealism | Scoop.it

Another incredible figure in the Italian Neorealism movement in director Federico Fellini. His film career took a turn for the best in 1945 when Italy was liberated and he went to work with Roberto Rossellini. He was quite different than any other director of his time in that he took the realities of life and made them into the surrealism of his art. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Simeon Stoyanov from Italian Neorealism & Spaghetti Westerns A Western Sub-Genre
Scoop.it!

Umberto D. (1952)

Umberto D. (1952) | ItalianNeorealism | Scoop.it

Umberto D. (1952) was directed by Vittorio de Sica and is called the movie that ended the Italian Neorealist movement. Like any neorealist film of the time it follows that insight into human condition in postwar Italy. Umberto is and elder man and the main protagonist in which he is struggling to keep living because the rent keeps on getting more expensive. As all neorealist movie he sells his stuff in order to survive in the world.


Via Izabel Marinova, MikeVilches
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Simeon Stoyanov from The Italian Neorealism and Spaghetti Westerns
Scoop.it!

Vittorio De Sica - The Bicycle Thief [Italian Neorealist Film 1948]

If anyone should give a presentation about one of the greatest film movements of all time, Italian Neorealism, they should include Vittorio De Sica's The Bicycle Thief. Mostly because of the movie's excellent depiction of how the population lived throughout the time period after WWII. Also like any Italian Neorealism film that you can see the cast is built up of non-professional actors and on the spot filming.


Via Izabel Marinova
more...
No comment yet.