Italian Neorealism
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Characteristics of Italian Neorealism

Characteristics of Italian Neorealism | Italian Neorealism | Scoop.it

Via Ryan Schad
Nyisha Jones's insight:

This movement began as a response to the political and economic issues that arose in Italy after the end of World War II. The Italian Neorealism movement is characterized by stories about the lower class with non-professional actors. The budgets for these films were very low and the purpose was to display "real life," similar to a documentary. Most Italian neorealistic films were often shot outdoors in poor neighborhoods and the countryside.

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Roberto Rossellini

Roberto Rossellini | Italian Neorealism | Scoop.it

Via Film 2700 Group
Nyisha Jones's insight:

·         1906 - 1977

·         Is considered the founder of Italian neorealism

·         His films at the time were more documentary and less fiction

·         Had a war trilogy starting with his first movie Rome Open City and then was followed by Paisan and Germany Year Zero.

·         In his career he had an affair with Ingrid Bergman who was a Swedish actress. She was in his second trilogy, Stromboli, Europa ’51, and Voyage to Italy. At the time these films didn’t have much interest from the audience but now, they are admired.

·         He didn’t always stay in documentary type films. He tested the waters in religion and drama.

·         His most famous movie would be II Generale Della Rovere which is war drama.

·         During the end of this movement, he worked on television with historical drama in major figures.

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Film 2700 Group 's curator insight, March 21, 2013 3:23 PM

Roberto Rossellini was a major player in the Italian Neorealism movement. In his movies he depicted various scenes and happenings during World War Two. He strove to show his viewers the struggles, conflicts and misunderstanding of real life during the war. In particular his documentary-style film, Paisan (1946), showed struggles between Italian partisans and the occupying forces.

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Vittorio de Sica

Vittorio de Sica | Italian Neorealism | Scoop.it

Via Italian Neorealism
Nyisha Jones's insight:

·         1902 – 1974

·         Considered one of the most influential directors during the movement.

·         He focused on working with nonprofessional actors and fully exploring and understanding the character.

·         His movies worked with the social and political problems during the era.

·         Later on in his years, he worked with comedies.

·         Like Roberto, his work soon also grew less favorable until today.

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Italian Neorealism's curator insight, March 15, 2013 12:01 PM

Vittorio de Sica is known for the films Benditi a Orgosolo (Bandits of Orgosolo) 

Bicycle Thieves, Miracle In Milan, and Umberto D.

Bicyle Thieves is arguably his most important and most famous work. Umberto D is regarded as the film that ended the movement. 

Film 2700 Group 's comment, March 17, 2013 9:49 PM
One of the major director's involved with the Italian Neorealist Movement.
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Luchino Visconti

Luchino Visconti | Italian Neorealism | Scoop.it

Via Film 2700 Group
Nyisha Jones's insight:

·         1906 – 1976

·         Realistic of modern society after the war.

·         His movie Ossessione established who he was in the industry.  Considered a work of art of realism. 

·         His films included some professional actors and also the locals, natural settings, and different camera shots to add more realistic value.

·         He had a company that provided actors.

·         His work also let Italy in the light of everything around them including pieces from France and even the United States. 

·         Later on in his years, he mostly worked with operas.

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Film 2700 Group 's curator insight, March 23, 2013 10:55 AM

Luchino Visconti was one of the major directors who emerged from Neorealism. Visconti was more foucsed on left-wing causes. His first film, Ossessioine, was a major part of the realist revival during the last few years of fascist cinema. Visconti claims that the term neo-realism was born along with his film. He also worked with operas as well, including sumptuous costumes and overpowering music. As Visconti continued with his films, they tended to evoke the lifestyles of the rich but at the same time reflected the class conflict that the lifestyles tend to hide. 

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Martin Scorsese's "My Voyage to Italy"

Nyisha Jones's insight:

This film is a voyage through Italian cinema history, marking influential films for Scorsese and particularly covering the Italian Neorealism period. The films of Roberto Rossellini make up for half the films discussed in the documentary, dealing with his seminal influence on Italian cinema and cinema history.

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Film Noir and Italian Neorealism

Film Noir and Italian Neorealism | Italian Neorealism | Scoop.it
Nyisha Jones's insight:

The theme of Film Noir is the stories and everyday people with a sense of realism that the majority of audiences can relate to. Film Noir didn't take away the aspect of nonprofessional actors that was used in Italian Neorealism, but did take away the appeal of lower working class struggles. Film Noir continues to evolve today keeping the appeal of Italian Neorealism at its basis.

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Italian Neorealism: A History through Film

A summary of films and directors during post WWII Italian Cinema or Italian Neo-Realism. Clips of Films include Rome: Open City, Bicycle Thieves, Umberto D, ...
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Ten Points of Italian Neorealism

Ten Points of Italian Neorealism | Italian Neorealism | Scoop.it

In 1952, the Parisian journal Films& Documents published the famous "ten points of neorealism," which, to a large degree, still remain valid.

1. A message: for the Italian filmmakers, cinema is a way of expression and communication in the true sense of this word.

2. Topical scripts inspired by concrete events; great historical and social issues are tackled from the point of

view of the common people.

3. A sense of detail as a means of authentication.

4. A sense of the masses and the ability to surprise (De Sica) or manipulate them in front of camera (De Santis, Visconti): the protagonists are captured in their relationship to the masses.

5.Realism; but reality is filtered by a very delicate e sensitivity.

6. The truth of actors,often non professionals.

7.The truth of decor and a refusal of the studio.

8.The truth of the lighting.

9.Photography reminiscent of the reportage style stresses the impression of truth.

10.An extremely free e camera; its unrestricted movements result from the use of post synchronization.


Via Edmarie Torres Pellerano
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Rome: Open City

Rossellini's Rome: Open City portrayed a vivid chronicle of Nazi occupation of Italy's capital and a small underground movement against the Nazis. It brought global awareness to the Italian Neorealism Movement.The next two films "Paisan" and "Germany Year Zero" ended his war trilogy.


Via Italian Neorealism
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The Bicycle Thief


Via MikeVilches
Nyisha Jones's insight:

De Sica's Bicycle Thieves tells the story of a man roaming the streets trying to find his bicycle only to steal another bicycle but was caught and labeled a thief. He was promised a job as long as he has a way to get there and soon after taking the job, his bike was stolen. This film shows the degree of desperation most Italians had during the post-war period.

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MikeVilches's curator insight, April 3, 2013 12:24 AM

With the filming of everyday people without having professional actors and also huge sets. These films were made using the common people and also the different locations that display and gives a sense of emotion to be experiencing the everyday life of the Italians after World War II. This shows the Italian poor and working class living in the very poor conditions and that is what Italian Neorealism wants to capture.

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Ossessione

"Ossessione" was popularly thought of as being the film that coined the term "Neorealism." The was Visconti's first feature film based on the novel the" Postman Always Rings Twice." This film recieved much attention from Fascist Censors and even the church because of its depiction of an illicit love affair, his harsh representation of Italian Provincial life, and a homosexual character.

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French New Wave and Italian Neorealism

French New Wave and Italian Neorealism | Italian Neorealism | Scoop.it
Nyisha Jones's insight:

French New Wave came about in the 1950's and 1960's. It was influenced by Italian Neorealism and Classical Hollywood Cinema. These directors were experimental in their films. They rejected the normal conventions of film making and tried new things such as with editing, themes, and shot compositions. Both filmed on location using small crews , captured the way people really interacted and talked, and favored looser more organic stories rather than complex ideas.

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Cinema Nova and Italian Neorealism

Cinema Nova and Italian Neorealism | Italian Neorealism | Scoop.it

Via Italian Neorealism
Nyisha Jones's insight:

Cinema Nova (New Cinema) was influenced by two foreign models to make independent non-industrial films. They drew from Italian Neorealism it's use of nonprofessional actors and on-location shooting and from the French New Wave it's low budget production strategy.

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Italian Neorealism's curator insight, March 16, 2013 3:41 PM

The Cinema Novo (New Cinema) drew on two foreign models to help make independent non-industrial films. They took from the Italian Neorealism for its use of nonprofessional actors and location shooting, and the French New Wave for its low budget production strategy.

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The End of The Movement

Umberto D. train scene D: Vittorio De Sica (1952) A: Carlo Battisti
Nyisha Jones's insight:

The fall of Neorealism was often dubbed the Crisis of Realism. Neorealism began to decline at the beginning of the 1950s. Italy had increase in economic growth and the Italian economic miracle began. The growth gave Italy more optimism, which was more prevalent in American movies at the time. People began to see that the Italian films were demoralizing, since they revolved around the theme of poverty and suffering.  They began to import American films and started to create some with a Hollywood theme. Italy even began to ban the exporting of Italian films. Even though the Neorealism period was short, it was very influential for future films.

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