Italian Neorealism 1945-1951
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Italian Neorealism 1945-1951
Following WW2, Italian filmmakers were left without studios and were forced to shoot on location. In 1949 Andreotti's Law was passed, under which the government could grant loans to make films, after approving the script. Out of these events, came Italian Neorealism. Italian Neorealism was comprised of real life events, existentialism, and scenes which reflected the average lives of Italians after the war.
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Radio : Out & About

Radio : Out & About | Italian Neorealism 1945-1951 | Scoop.it
The exhibit taking place focuses on paintings done between 1950-1968, they tell us about the time when manual labour was much more honorable than it is today, tells of a post-war period in the Soviet Union, when it seems that everything was...
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This article advertises an exhibit about Soviet Neorealism. By seeing how Neorealism isn't limited to national borders, it is evident why Neorealism is important and relevant. Every nation has its struggles and those struggles can be transformed into lessons and tools of informing. This article reiterates why Italian Neorealism is important and continues to be relevant. 

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Italian Neorealism Spring 2013

Italian Neorealism Spring 2013 | Italian Neorealism 1945-1951 | Scoop.it
Here are photos from the Valentino Spring 2013 ready to wear collection. These designs remind me of old Roberto Rossellini films.
Alexis Zimniak's insight:

How does fashion relate to Italian Neorealism? Despite seemingly opposite origins, this fashion line was inspired by looks exhibited in films of the Italian Neorealism wave. This link shows how Italian Neorealism continues to be influential today. It is incredibly profound how a simple representation of life can turn into an art movement that remains influental decades later. This link is an example of how powerful this type of film was and is. 

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Wadjda: First Film from Saudi Arabia Gives Women Hope of Change

Wadjda: First Film from Saudi Arabia Gives Women Hope of Change | Italian Neorealism 1945-1951 | Scoop.it
Haifaa al-Mansour film highlights daily oppression of women in Saudi Arabia.
Alexis Zimniak's insight:

Struggle after World War 2 was not unheard of. Oppression lead to denial of basic human rights and everyone felt the backlash after the war. Although it is easy to imagine these difficulties happening in a far off place, it is not so easy to understand that these struggles are still happening and people are still being denied rights like exposing their faces in public. This is evident in Saudi Arabia, where women are considered second class. In this article it is demonstrated how Italian Neorealism was used to help these women. The film, Wadjda, was inspired by Bicycle Theif. This film shows a peek inside the life of Saudi Arabian women and their struggles. In this article we see how Italian Neorealism continues to be relevant and applicable to today. 

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Real Cinema: An introduction to Italian Neo-Realism

Real Cinema: An introduction to Italian Neo-Realism | Italian Neorealism 1945-1951 | Scoop.it
  This is where Anna Magnani broke away from 2 German soldiers, ran and threw herself down on the streets. The man is explaining the making of a film, rather than some historical event.
Alexis Zimniak's insight:

This introduction to Italian Neorealism covers the basics of the style and how it began. Italian Neorealism is characterized by real life portrayals of the struggles of Italians post World War II. This came to place following the ousting of Mussolini and the Italian Spring. Cultural backlash toward state structure and organized religion culminated into Italian Neorealism. 

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U, Me and Films: Bicycle Thieves: My Introduction to Italian Neo-Realism

U, Me and Films: Bicycle Thieves: My Introduction to Italian Neo-Realism | Italian Neorealism 1945-1951 | Scoop.it
Alexis Zimniak's insight:

This blog entry demonstrates the emotion effects of Italian Neorealism as an art movement. Life in Italy during this time was unpleasant and Neorealism doesn't romanticize that. The author of this blog states how an iconic Neorealistic film, Bicycle Thief, made him feel. He felt melancholy and unsettled by the troubles of the main character. This reaction shows how Italian Neorealism came to be. Life in Italy was hard and that's all that was needed to make film. Difficult times portrayed by real people contributed to this style of film. 

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Italian Neo-Realism: A History through Film

A summary of films and directors during post WWII Italian Cinema or Italian Neo-Realism. Clips of Films include Rome: Open City, Bicycle Thieves, Umberto D, ...
Alexis Zimniak's insight:

This video is comprised of clips from films exhibiting qualities of Italian Neorealism. This video is a broad representation of these films and how they weren't typical hollywood films. These films had real people with real problems that Italians could relate to during this time. It is seen in this video that Italian Neorealism doesn't romanticize things, but it simply uses real life to inform and entertain. 

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Italian Neorealism

A documentary-type thing I made for school about Italian Neorealism. So yeah. All music, video, and pictures used under fair use.
Alexis Zimniak's insight:

This short video covers the birth of Italian Neorealism and how it was able to breakthrough, despite resistance by the government. Although these films didn't "entertain", they served a greater purpose internatoinally by showing Italy's struggles. Real people were cast to play the roles, making this film style even more authentic. 

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CDR Salamander: The Wages of Neo-Realism

CDR Salamander: The Wages of Neo-Realism | Italian Neorealism 1945-1951 | Scoop.it
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This article compares Neorealism to real life events such as the events in Syria and how the US experience in Iraq has shaped our nation. This comparison emphasizes how Italian Neorealism exhibited real life events in its production. This potrayal of real life exemplifies how life in Italy during this time was so dramatic, it didn't need to be edited to be a form of art. 

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Artistic impressions: Italian Neorealism, American Postwar Film, Shomin-geki and Satyajit Ray

Artistic impressions: Italian Neorealism, American Postwar Film, Shomin-geki and Satyajit Ray | Italian Neorealism 1945-1951 | Scoop.it
Alexis Zimniak's insight:

This blog post addresses a common question directed towards Italian Neorealism: why would people want to see their "own miserable lives" portrayed on screen, instead of something to help them escape their daily lives? This question can be simply answered by considering the historical  significance of events during these times. It is and was important for the world to know the struggles of Italians post World War II, because history will repeat itself should we forget too soon. Mussolini wreaked havoc on Italy and his mark was not unnoticed after he was taken down. Struggles portrayed in Italian Neorealistic films serve the purpose of historical remembrance and transforming a grim reality into an art movement. 

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NEOREALISM (Antonioni, Bertolucci, De Sica, Fellini, Pasolini, Rosselllini, Visconti) unlite.com

NEOREALISM (ITALY 1973) Interviews with Antonioni Bertolucci De Sica Fellini Moravia Pasolini Rossellini Visconti Zavatiini et al. See "Auteurs" on THE UNLIT...
Alexis Zimniak's insight:

This video shows interviews with Italian filmmakers of 1973. In these interviews we hear their thoughts and opinions on the wave of Italian Neorealism. Among these filmmakers is Bernardo Bertolucci who claims, "Those movies show too many bad things about Italy." This opinion was not unpopular, as Italian Neorealism portrayed unadultered events of what life was like in Italy post World War II. The grim reality facing Italians during the Italian Spring was almost poetic, allowing Italian Neorealism to flourish as an artistic representation of life in Italy from 1945-1951.  

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