Italian Neorealism (1945-1951)
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Italian Neorealism (1945-1951)
Film during the Italian Neorealism period
Curated by Ryan Schad
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Italian Neorealism History

Italian Neorealism History | Italian Neorealism (1945-1951) | Scoop.it

The Italian Neorealism movement began at the end of World War II in Italy when the political aspect of Benito Mussolini's government fell and the Italy was liberated. This made the Italian film industry collapse which helped Neorealism lead to social change and cultural progress in Italy. However, after the fall of Mussolini's government, him and the fascits were ousted.

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Ossessione (1943)

This film is considered to be the first Neorealism film even though there is debate that the categorization is not accruate. This film was banned by Mussolini and the fascist authorities due to it's subject matter. However, this film is about a man and woman who fall in love even though the woman is married. The man she is married to she is only with because of his money. The plot soon takes a sharp turn between the three main characters.

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Andreotti's Law (1949)

Andreotti's Law (1949) | Italian Neorealism (1945-1951) | Scoop.it

Adreotti's law is trying to support the Italian film industry. Theaters had to screen Italian films 80 days a year for each imported film and distributor had to pay a fee to the government. They had to submit the ideas of their films or a script to government so neorealist films can't get loans. The new rules of export license of Italian films allows them to deny certain films an export license.

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Giovanni Verga

Giovanni Verga | Italian Neorealism (1945-1951) | Scoop.it

Giovanni Verga was an Italian realist who played a large role on the impact of Italian Neorealism. He is a novelist and short story writer whose reputation was slow to develop but current critics have assessed him as one of the greatest of all Italian novelists. His influence was particularly marked on the post-World War II generation of Italian authors.

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The Influence Italian Neorealism Had

The Influence Italian Neorealism Had | Italian Neorealism (1945-1951) | Scoop.it

It opened the door to filming on location rather than in a studio and it showed filmmakers that movies can be used to highlight the reality of societal problems and make viewers consider social change. In Asia, Africa, and Latin America, it demonstrated that you could make great films inexpensively with your own country’s landscape and people. This helped because there was no need for lavish sets or expensive stars.

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Film Sets

Film Sets | Italian Neorealism (1945-1951) | Scoop.it

During this time period, films were being shot in the streets because of how bad the war left film studios in Italy. The sets were usually run-down because this was right after the war. Films during this time generally consisted of nonprofessional actors but, well known actors were usually cast in leading roles. The background people in the films were just local people.

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The Bicycle Thief (1948)

The Bicycle Thief is known as one of the greatest movies around the world.  It is a story of man who is trying to get a job and in order to get his job he needs to have a bike. Him and his wife then sell the sheets and buy a bike when at work the next day the bike is stolen. He then sets off to find the theif that stole his bike. The film placed sixth as the greatest film ever made in Sight & Sound's latest directors' poll, conducted in 2002. It was also given an honorary Academy Award in 1950.

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Religion During Neorealism Period

Religion During Neorealism Period | Italian Neorealism (1945-1951) | Scoop.it

Political change in 1948 saw a set-back for those parties which were closely associated with the drive for change and renewal and keen to underline the dignity and the power of the proletariat. Neorealist films and their directors incurred the wrath of the then ruling party (Christian Democrats) and of the Catholic church. This led to a cultural backlash toward state structure and the organized religion of the Catholic Church.

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Characteristics of Neorealism

Characteristics of Neorealism | Italian Neorealism (1945-1951) | Scoop.it

Ideologically, the characteristics of Italian neorealism were:

1. a new democratic spirit, with emphasis on the value of ordinary people,

2. a compassionate point of view and a refusal to make easy moral judgements

3. a preoccupation with Italy's Fascist past and its aftermath of wartime devastation
4. a blending of Christian and Marxist humanism
5. an emphasis on emotions rather than abstract ideas

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Nyisha Jones's curator insight, March 26, 2014 5:44 PM

This movement began as a response to the political and economic issues that arose in Italy after the end of World War II. The Italian Neorealism movement is characterized by stories about the lower class with non-professional actors. The budgets for these films were very low and the purpose was to display "real life," similar to a documentary. Most Italian neorealistic films were often shot outdoors in poor neighborhoods and the countryside.

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Rome, Open City (1945)

Rome, Open City is a 1945 Italian war drama film, directed by Roberto Rossellini. This film is about when the Nazi's occupied Rome and resistance leader Giorgio Manfredi, is chased by the gestapo. Manfredi tries to get a new identity and leave town but he is betrayed by his lover and is arrested by the Germans. This story takes place in Rome during World War II.

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