Italian Neo-Realism
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Key Elements of the Genre

Key Elements of the Genre | Italian Neo-Realism | Scoop.it

Rome, Open City directed by Roberto Rossellini

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-Emphasis on real lives

-Non-profit cast/untrained actors

-Shot in streets and countryside

-Italian language dubbing

-Analysis of recent events associated with WWII

-Focus on collectivity rather than the individual

-Focused on the lower class 

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GreenCine | Italian Neo-Realism

GreenCine | Italian Neo-Realism | Italian Neo-Realism | Scoop.it
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It is said that history is told through films.  Italian Neo-realism is the perfect example of this.  Italian Neo-realism portrays the emotions of the everyday people better than any era in film history.  Men like Rafaello Matarazzo and Cesare Zavattini were inspired by the mood and emotions of the people in the post WWII era.  This play on the mood of the people makes the film that much more real and allow the audience to really get in and relate to the film topic.

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The Roots of Neorealism

The Roots of Neorealism | Italian Neo-Realism | Scoop.it
Italian filmmakers in the immediate post-war period created their own cinematic language to capture the hardships of everyday life in a shattered nation. But though revolutionary in impact, the new realism was not a complete break with the past. Its roots went deep, to the work of directors in Italy and beyond which, over preceding decades, had prefigured the themes and formal innovation of a style that would become one of cinema’s most influential movements.

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Roberto Rossellini

Roberto Rossellini | Italian Neo-Realism | Scoop.it
Oscar Ramirez's insight:

Rossellini was one of the most important directors of Italian neorealist cinema, a style of film characterized by stories set amongst the poor and working class, filmed on location, frequently using nonprofessional actors. Francois Truffaut (a film critic) noted in a 1963 essay that Rossellini’s influence in France (particularly among the directors who would become part of the Nouvelle Vague) was so great that he was in every sense, “the father of the French New Wave”. He married Ingrid Bergman and was the father of Isabella Rossellini.

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Vittorio De Sica

Vittorio De Sica | Italian Neo-Realism | Scoop.it
Oscar Ramirez's insight:

Vittorio De Sica was born in poverty and later became an actor. He then collaborated with Luchino Visconti and Cesare Zavattini.  His films had help sustained the Italian movement, especially Two Women starring Sophia Loren.

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I Bambini Ci Guardano/ The Children Are Watching Us by Vitorrio De Sica

Scene from this italian movie, directed en 1942 by Vittorio De Sica (released only in 1944)
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Vittorio De Sica - The Bicycle Thief Part 1 [Ladri di biciclette][Italian Neorealist Film 1948].flv - YouTube

Hailed around the world as one of the greatest movies ever made, Vittorio De Sica's Academy Award--winning Bicycle Thieves (Ladri di biciclette) defined an e...
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One of the most famous films to emerge from Italian Neo-Realism

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La dolce Vita: Trevi Fountain. - YouTube

Share your videos with friends, family, and the world

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Oscar Ramirez's insight:

Fellini is highly regarded as the most influential Italian Neorealist director, and this is the most famous scene from one of his most important films, La Dolce Vita.

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Future Wolfe.'s curator insight, March 6, 2014 11:47 AM

Fellini is highly regarded as the most influential Italian Neorealist director, and this is the most famous scene from one of his most important films, La Dolce Vita.

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cineCollage :: Italian Neorealism

cineCollage :: Italian Neorealism | Italian Neo-Realism | Scoop.it
Italian neorealism was the first postwar cinema to liberate filmmaking from the artificial confines of the studio and, by extension, from the Hollywood-originated studio system.
Oscar Ramirez's insight:

Over time, the movement faded in popularity. Though critics still watched and enjoyed these methods of film making, the general public grew tired of the often boring shots and constant use of low class actors.  This led the people to gearing towards the more Hollywood based style films. Budgets were increased and higher class and well known were starting to be used.  People in general enjoyed more fantasy films. Fantasy allows people to escape from their real world troubles and it was predictable that eventually the people would get tired of living their same lives through their forms of entertainment as well.  This shifted the focus of movies back towards the well known and liked American Hollywood adventure and fantasy films.

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10 great Italian neorealist films

10 great Italian neorealist films | Italian Neo-Realism | Scoop.it
With Roberto Rossellini's masterpiece Rome, Open City back in cinemas, we present a 10-film primer on one of film history’s most important movements: Italian neorealism.
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A list of 10 popular films under Italian Neorealism that date from 1942 to 2010. 

They include:

- Il Tetto (1956) [shown above] --- about a newlywed's struggle to find a home. Living with family but then kicked out and then asked friends to help build them a home

-Gomorrah (2008) Matteo Garrone--- Mimics Rossellini's films of following multiple characters experiencing liberation, this movie follows wannabe gangsters, tailors, waste-management officials, and middlemen and how the Camorra Mafia influenced Southern Italy

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Studies in Cinema: Thoughts on Italian Neorealism

Studies in Cinema: Thoughts on Italian Neorealism | Italian Neo-Realism | Scoop.it

Via Future Wolfe.
Oscar Ramirez's insight:

The war torn, bombed background that are present in many neorealist films gave them an "in the now" feel, and are credited with inspiring similar film movements in South America and France, and to some extent the independent films of the US. 

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Future Wolfe.'s curator insight, March 6, 2014 12:17 PM

The war torn, bombed background that are present in many neorealist films gave them an "in the now" feel, and are credited with inspiring similar film movements in South America and France, and to some extent the independent films of the US. 

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Cinema under fascism: the advent of sound and the increase of national production

"Outside of Italy, little was known of Italian cinema during the fascist period, and this ignorance encouraged the erroneous idea abroad that the post–World War II Italian cinema had arisen miraculously from the ashes of the war. In retrospect, many important achievements of this era are more clear."

Oscar Ramirez's insight:

Benito Mussolini understood the effect films had on Italian citizens. The films , often dubbed telefoni blanchi, presented complete negation of the realities in the world, especially Italy, and emphasized a great sense of nationalistic pride and identity.

 

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Darò un milione - selezione scene - - YouTube

Clip from the Italian film, Daro une milione, or I'll Give One Million

 

Oscar Ramirez's insight:

During the Fascist reign in Italy prior to world war ll,  cinemas showed dominantly Telefoni Blanchi films, or "white telephone" films; this symbolized the bourgeois wealth during that time period. The films often portrayed conservative themes promoting family values and respect for authority. The actors and actresses even dressed similarly to the film stars in America (i.e, Shirley Temple Curls).

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cineCollage :: Italian Neorealism

cineCollage :: Italian Neorealism | Italian Neo-Realism | Scoop.it
Italian neorealism was the first postwar cinema to liberate filmmaking from the artificial confines of the studio and, by extension, from the Hollywood-originated studio system.

Via Future Wolfe.
Oscar Ramirez's insight:

Neorealism, like so many artistic movements, started as a reaction to the changes to the political and social climate in a post WWII Italy, Most films were shot on location, and used non professional actors. The goals of these films were to show the human condition of the average citizen, after years of being highly censors by Mussolini's fascist regime,  Many of these films "avoided happy endings at all costs."

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Future Wolfe.'s curator insight, March 6, 2014 12:13 PM

Neorealism, like so many artistic movements, started as a reaction to the changes to the political and social climate in a post WWII Italy, Most films were shot on location, and used non professional actors. The goals of these films were to show the human condition of the average citizen, after years of being highly censors by Mussolini's fascist regime,  Many of these films "avoided happy endings at all costs."

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Top 10 Greatest Italian Film Directors - Listverse

Top 10 Greatest Italian Film Directors - Listverse | Italian Neo-Realism | Scoop.it
The art of Rome contributed immensely (probably more than any other nation) to Western culture. This continued through the middle ages with Church art and

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Oscar Ramirez's insight:

This list gives a brief summary of the impact of the 10 most influential directors of this movement, and their best works. 

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Future Wolfe.'s curator insight, March 6, 2014 12:32 PM

This list gives a brief summary of the impact of the 10 most influential directors of this movement, and their best works. 

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The Flowers of St. Francis (Roberto Rossellini, 1950) - YouTube

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Oscar Ramirez's insight:

-The Flowers of St. Francis, directed by Roberto Rossellini

-This film was released on December 14th, 1950

Based on two novels that relates to the life of St. Francis & his early work

-Convey the universal teachings of the People’s Saint: humility, compassion, faith, and sacrifice.

-Photographed to evoke the medieval paintings of Saint Francis’s time, and cast with monks from the Nocera Inferiore Monastery.

-The Flowers of St. Francis is a timeless and moving portrait of the search for spiritual enlightenment

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The Children are Watching Us, directed by Vittorio De Sica

The Children are Watching Us, directed by Vittorio De Sica | Italian Neo-Realism | Scoop.it
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Was released on October 27th, 1944

It’s a drama of a young mother who walks out on her family and how her leaving effects the life of her four year old son

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The Bicycle Thieves directed by Vittorio De Sica

The Bicycle Thieves directed by Vittorio De Sica | Italian Neo-Realism | Scoop.it
Oscar Ramirez's insight:

-1948 story of a poor father searching post-World War II Rome for his stolen bicycle, without which he will lose the job which was to be the salvation of his young family.
-The film embodies the greatest strengths of the Italian neorealist movement: emotional clarity, social rectitude, and brutal honesty

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Federico Fellini

Federico Fellini | Italian Neo-Realism | Scoop.it
The women who both attracted and frightened him and an Italy dominated in his youth by Mussolini and Pope Pius XII - inspired the dreams that Fellini...

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Oscar Ramirez's insight:

Known for films with a dream like, nostalgic feel, Fellini's impact is still felt on directors to this day. 

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Future Wolfe.'s curator insight, March 6, 2014 12:07 PM

Known for films with a dream like, nostalgic feel, Fellini's impact is still felt on directors to this day. 

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I Vitelloni | Federico Fellini (1953) Trailer

7 ART CINEMA | La passion du Cinéma ! >>> http://7-art.blogspot.com COMEDIEN > http://cithe.blogspot.com I Vitelloni 1953 - Italie / France - Comédie dramatique - 1h43 Réalisation : Federico Fellini avec : Franco Interlenghi (Moraldo), Alberto Sordi (Alberto), Franco Fabrizi (Fausto), Leopoldo Trieste (Leopoldo), Riccardo Fellini (Riccardo)...
Oscar Ramirez's insight:

• Was released in 1953
• This is film about 5 young men who are desperate to flee their small town in Italy to find new adventures.

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Tweet from @itneorealism

Watched 'Up in the Air' (2009) by Jason Reitman. This film was great and had lots of neorealism inspiration behind it
Oscar Ramirez's insight:

The film Up in the Air focuses primarily on the life of a corporate downsizing expert, whose job is primarily firing people. You can see aspects of Italian Neorealism in the film every time the main actor (George Clooney) is set to lay off people. He is placed in the same room with the soon to be ex-employee (set among the working class) and you can see the desperation and sadness that arises from the fired employee (emphasizing the raw emotions someone would feel in a true setting). The film revolves around the reality of people getting laid off due to the economic struggle that is occurring while following the life of a lonely corporate downsizing expert. 

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Up in the Air (1/9) Movie CLIP - People Do Crazy Sh** When They Get Fired (2009) HD - YouTube

Up in the Air Movie Clip - watch all clips http://j.mp/A8izna click to subscribe http://j.mp/sNDUs5 Ryan (George Clooney) fires people for a living and his l...
Oscar Ramirez's insight:

The beginning of the clip shows the different ways people react to the distressing event called getting fired. A very real situation that occurs everyday is being played out in a realistic setting.

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