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Italia Mia
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Olive Oil Experience in Le Marche

Olive Oil Experience in Le Marche | Italia Mia | Scoop.it

Le Marche is renowned for its picturesque landscape, and olive treestogether with grapes contribute to the magical colours of this land, with its green and purple shades. In the Marches every October is the “olive season” which means one of the few occasion a family can work all together in the fields to prepare some of the best olive oil in the world.

Nowadays we can buy olive oil almost everywhere but nothing can beat the quality and the experience of making your own oil with organic and classic procedures. Mass-produced oil can not compete with the local one. It is really two different worlds.

Picking olives with your hands and taking them to the "Pistrì" in local dialect “Frantoio” in italian, the olive press (the modern one is even better than the traditional), to produce an oil that you can call your own, to smell and taste a fresh made extra virgin olive oil is an unforgettable experience. Travel to Italy to pick olives in october starts to be a wonderful way to visit Italy far from the crowds of the high season and more and more people appreciate this as a safe and affordable way to bring back the oil for the family uses. Food & Wine tasting, wonderful hilltop towns, works of art and breathtaking landscapes are only a little part of what Le Marche can propose to your holidays.

The first thing you have to do is to find a beautiful farm with accommodation that allows you to engage in this "rebalancing" activity, there are a lot of these in Italy and especially in Le Marche. Villas, hotels and agriturismos that offer this opportunity are in impressive spots, like on top of hills overlooking the Sibilline Mountains or the Adriatic Sea, where you can open your spirit seeing the true beauty of Le Marche.

Then you have to prepare yourself because, although the olive harvest is not the hardest rural activities, it won’t be easy. In this day and age, we’re not accustomed to do physical job any more but olive making is a very physical and spiritual activity.

Humility and Patience are necessary for this endeavor, otherwise you might consider this activity as a wonderful way to develop these two important qualities. Find the olive, settle the net, pick it, deposit and repeat. It may sound silly but, at the end of the day, it’s very fulfilling.

The next step is the real making of the oil and you will be introduced by the experts to the wonderful world of olive oil that match centenary and modern knoledge, and then the only thing left to do is try your oil.

Producing oil is a matter of heart, so, after a day of “hard” work you can have a “bruschetta” and a glass of wine and really enjoy life.

One accommodations that offer olive oil experience is the Agriturismo A3Passi the Accommodation of the international prized company Azienda del Carmine

Visit the internet sites:

www.a3passi.com 

www.aziendadelcarmine.it 

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Amalfi Coast

Mariano Pallottini's insight:

The Amalfi Coast (Italian: Costiera Amalfitana) is a stretch of coastline on the southern coast of the Sorrentine Peninsula in the Province of Salerno in Southern Italy. The Amalfi Coast is a popular tourist destination for the region and Italy as a whole, attracting thousands of tourists annually. During the 10th–11th centuries, the Duchy of Amalfi existed on the territory of the Amalfi Coast, centered in the town of Amalfi. The Amalfi coast was later controlled by the Principality of Salerno, until Amalfi was sacked by the Republic of Pisa in 1137. Since then the Amalfi coast has experienced a crisis.[2] But after the unification of Italy the Amalfi coast has enjoyed a huge economic revival, prompted even by the international tourism. In 1997, the Amalfi Coast was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site as a cultural landscape.

Wikipedia

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Go Barefoot in Abruzzo, Italy

Go Barefoot to taste the real Italy in the unspoilt region of Abruzzo, staying in charming hotels or rustic country villas.
Enjoy cooking, painting, pottery, Italian language and wine tasting classes, truffle hunting, grazing and milking sheep, cheese making and fishing from a traditional trabocco, castle and historical village tours, visits to wineries and olive oil mills, grape and olive harvest, biking excursions, plus, day trips to Rome or Naples.

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How to Make Olive Oil - Olive Oil Makers in Italy

Real olive oil producers in Umbria, Italy! The local Italian farmers take pride in their work, and produce one of the most important and iconic products in Italy. Observe the process step-by-step as the farmers harvest, wash, press and bottle this liquid gold we know as extra virgin olive oil, and learn just how many olives it takes to make a single gallon! 

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Italian sporting hero posthumously honored as Righteous Gentile

Italian sporting hero posthumously honored as Righteous Gentile | Italia Mia | Scoop.it
Yad Vashem honors popular Italian public figure Gino Bartali, who risked his life to save Jews by transporting forged documents across the country.

Yad Vashem announced Monday that it had posthumously recognized Italian public figure Gino Bartali as Righteous Among the Nations.

Bartali, a devout Catholic, was a champion road cyclist who won the Tour de France twice, and the Giro d'Italia multi-stage race three times. He was involved in a Jewish-Christian rescue network led by Rabbi Nathan Cassuto of Florence and the Archbishop of Florence, Cardinal Elia Angelo Dalla Costa. Yad Vashem recognized the latter as Righteous Among the Nations in 2012. The rescue network was established on the heels of the German occupation of Italy in September 1943, when Jews began to be deported.

Yad Vashem said that Bartali's role in the network was to serve as a courier, transporting forged documents between cities to Jews, concealing them inside the handlebar and seat of his bicycle. He used his sport training as a cover, risking his life in the process in order to save Jews. Apparently, when the cyclist was stopped and searched, he requested that his bicycle not be touched, telling authorities that it was adjusted in a specific manner so as to reach maximum speed.[...]

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36 Hours In... Norcia - Telegraph

36 Hours In... Norcia - Telegraph | Italia Mia | Scoop.it
Foodies with a weakness for some of Europe’s finest pork, boar and truffles descend on this walled town in the Umbrian hills for a festival of autumn feasting, writes Abigail Butcher.

Via Todiguide-Umbria
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Todiguide-Umbria's curator insight, September 20, 2013 12:23 AM

36 hours in #Norcia, #Umbria #Italy . Not only great #nature , but also a paradise for #foodies!

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7 unusual itineraries to discover Tuscany

7 unusual itineraries to discover Tuscany | Italia Mia | Scoop.it

Solve a mysterious murder set in the sixteenth century, chase the tracks of Professor Robert Langdon, the main character of the last best-selling novel by Dan Brown, have a wine tasting riding a quad bike or chasing old ghosts.

What do these curious experiences have in common? They are all unusual itineraries and tours to explore our beautiful Tuscany from a new and original point of view. Here are some ideas for a different experience of this magical land.

  1. Discover the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence following “Hell“, the Dan Brown novel set in the city. 
  2. Solve a crime set in the Renaissance and get to know the main monuments of the historical centre of Florence in six hours. 
  3. Know the mysterious side of Tuscany with Mystery Tuscany. Diana, the ghost river of Siena, the spirit of the Baron Brolio, the stories of love and death of beautiful Matilda in the castle of Poppi and the Devil’s Bridge in Borgo a Mozzano
  4. Taste the great wines and the traditional desserts of Tuscany, but with a good dose of adventure with a quad bike.
  5. Sail the waters of the Arno River in the magical light of the sunset on a vintage ship driven with a pole. 
  6. Travel in a carriage: for “slow travel” lovers there is “Toscana in Carrozza” with short and long offers. 
  7. Have a drink in the most important museums of Florence. “Aperitivo ad Arte“ takes place in the State Museums of Florence

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Lago di Orta, in the region of Piedmont

Lago di Orta, in the region of Piedmont | Italia Mia | Scoop.it

Lago di Orta, in the region of Piedmont, Italy, is nestled in the hills just east of Lake Maggiore. It’s only a thirty minute drive from Milan and Lake Maggiore, but without the hustle and bustle or glitz of Maggiore and another well known lake, Como. In fact not many people have heard of Lago di Orta, not even the Italians, though they comprise the majority of tourists there. I think they must want to keep it for themselves.
The town of Orta San Guilio on the east side of the lake is one of the most romantic places I’ve ever been. The buildings are all brilliant terracotta colors with tile rooftops and painted shutters, tumbling down the hillside toward the lake. It’s a pedestrian-only town, with one narrow alley-like street and few little side alleys that beckon you to explore them.
Towering above Orta San Guilio is Sacro Monte (spiritual mountain), a place of pilgrimage dedicated to Saint Francis of Assisi. There are twenty chapels illustrating the life of St.Francis along a clearly marked path with picnic and rest areas along the way.[...] You also have a spectacular view of the lake from the mountain.
Then there’s Isola San Guilio, a tiny gem of an island. In the ninth century the Bishop of Navaro built a basilica there which dominates the landscape. There’s also Benedictine monastery built in the 1900s. It seems that even the island is a place for the religious and spiritual seeker, although you could simply enjoy the scenery and the architecture. From Piazza Motto the main square in Orta San Guilio, you can take a ferry over to the island. [...]

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Gino’s Italian Escape: A culinary travel guide to Italy

Gino’s Italian Escape: A culinary travel guide to Italy | Italia Mia | Scoop.it

The This Morning chef offers up his five top spots to experience the best local food in his home nation

In chef Gino D’Acampo’s new six-part cooking travelogue, Gino’s Italian Escape (8pm, Fridays on ITV), he guides us around southern Italy, and crafts colourful meals with his home nation’s finest produce, revealing some of the county’s best kept secrets along the way. 

Ahead of the show, Radio Times Travel catches up with Gino for his top five Italian treats to try, while discovering Italy: 

1. Rome

2. Naples

3. Amalfi Coast

4. Bari

5. Bologna

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The Borghese Gallery - Rome

The Borghese Gallery in Rome is one work of art contains many others; it is a treasure trove that was commissioned by Scipione Borghese during the 17th Century.
Scipione was a sort of talent scout during his day; it was he who offered enhanced fame and opportunity to both Caravaggio and Gian Lorenzo Bernini. 
The Villa in which the Gallery is housed hosts the largest collection of Caravaggios in the world, along with a great number of Bernini's masterpieces, from Aeneas and Anchises and the Rape of Proserpina to his sculpture of David and of Apollo and Daphne, among several others. 
We also find here one of the most famous Canova statues in the world, the magnificent portrait of Paolina Borghese (Paolina Bonaparte).

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Why travel to Italy in the Autumn?

Why travel to Italy in the Autumn? | Italia Mia | Scoop.it

BE INSPIRED!
1. Harvest Season
Be surrounded with the scent of fresh harvest. All our walking holidays will feature festivals or markets during the season of abundant fresh foods. Embrace the slow food movement with local delicacies. Celebrations with perfect wine pairings abound. What could be better?
2. Cooler Temperatures
The summer months are hot and while that may be ideal for basking in the sun along the coast line, walking holidays are better enjoyed in the cooler months. Temperatures will be comfortable, in the low 70s Fahrenheit.
3. Fewer People.
Though many people still flock to Italy in the autumn, most towns are less crowded than in the high season of the summer months. This translates into less wait time in restaurants, less wait time to get into museums, and a getting a feel of real life in Italy.
4. Excellent Gastronomy
Fall is harvest time in Italy. Local produce abounds. My favourites include wild chestnuts, zucchini flowers stuffed with ricotta and of course, the elusive white truffle! Try some of the many varieties of olives soaking in the perfect brine. Restaurants prepare special menus to celebrate the harvest and use the freshest produce.
5. Wine Harvest
The Tuscan countryside is famed for its exceptional wine, and towns like Montalcino, Monetpulciano, Chianti, and Greve for example, come alive with colourful festivals, lively feasts and celebrations that date back to the enigmatic Etruscans.

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Mary H Goudie's comment, September 11, 2013 6:42 AM
Ditto for a visit to Portugal.
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Sicily: Montalbano's island - Telegraph

Sicily: Montalbano's island - Telegraph | Italia Mia | Scoop.it
The cult Sicilian detective series owes as much to the beauty of its island setting as it does to the mysteries solved when an inspector calls, says Lee Marshall.
Mariano Pallottini's insight:

This is a great article to experience Inspector Montalbano's Sicily, not a slavishly accurate “Montalbano tour” but a series of suggestions for those keen to absorb the colours and flavours of a part of Sicily with a special quality of light, landscapes possessed of a stark, archaic beauty, and historic town centres the equal of anything you can find in Tuscany. Plus – an important detail given Montalbano’s passion and knowledge about it – some of southern Italy’s most delicious food.

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3 Quiet Museums in Rome

3 Quiet Museums in Rome | Italia Mia | Scoop.it
Dropping in on these rarely visited, notably distinct spots creates a chance to experience culture away from the crowds.
Mariano Pallottini's insight:

Fresh Places:

  • Protestant Cemetery (Keats, Shelley and the other bright stars of art and literature)
  • Basilica of San Clemente (mysterious underground vaults and winding tunnels)

Unhurried and uncrowded places

  • Galleria Borghese (make a reservation)
  • Piazza del Campidoglio to see the Capitoline collections.
  • Museo di Palazzo Doria Pamphilj 
  • Museo delle Anime dei Defunti, alternately known as Museo delle Anime del Purgatorio, in Sacro Cuore, said to be the city’s only neo-Gothic church. 
  • Centrale Montemartini museum of industrial archaeology
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Beautiful Tuscany | Angles of Anghiari

Beautiful Tuscany | Angles of Anghiari | Italia Mia | Scoop.it

This small town is best known for the date of June 29, 1440 when Filippo Maria Visconti {Duke of Milan}, gave up all of his expansionist claims to the Italian Peninsula when he was defeated in a bloody battle by Florentine, Venetian and Papal Confederate troops in what is known as the Battle of Anghiari. Also the inspiration for the infamous ‘lost painting’ by Leonardo Da Vinci in Florence’s Palazzo Vecchio.
The views leading up to the town’s stone wall are heart-stoppingly beautiful.
The streets are tiny, winding and often go up. Everywhere you look is a picturesque scene. Flowers overflowing a windowsill or lemon trees dotting a doorway.
Of course when discovering any beautiful Tuscan town, you must stop at a bar for a caffe.
This place received the Orange Flag by the Italian Touring Club for being one of the prettiest villages in Italy.

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Tuscany Walking Festival: Autumn 2013

Tuscany Walking Festival: Autumn 2013 | Italia Mia | Scoop.it

The Tuscany Walking Festival, one of the most important hiking festivals in Italy, is back after the summer break. Even if it has already begun, check out next appointments in order to enjoy outdoor activities and the wonderful landscapes of the most beautiful natural parks in Tuscany...

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Italian Food Forever | The Foods Of Umbria

Italian Food Forever | The Foods Of Umbria | Italia Mia | Scoop.it

[...] Umbria relies strongly on seasonal produce such as mushrooms, wild asparagus, and numerous other fresh vegetables, and of course on the highly prized truffles that grow throughout the region. Truffles play an important part in many Umbrian dishes, including appetizers such as crostini al tartufo, or crostini alla norcina, made using anchovies, truffles and chicken livers. Both pasta and risotto dishes are also served with grated black or white truffles, while in Norcia, the homeland of the black truffle, both fresh and seasoned cheeses, as well as cured meats are seasoned with this regional treasure. Black truffles generally come from Valnerina while white truffles are harvested from the Upper Tevere valley and Eugubino Gualdese. The truffle is so highly coveted in Umbria, that in the fall and winter there are numerous festivals and markets held to celebrate these precious nuggets.

Antipasti in Umbria also reflect this regions best, and can be as simple as a variety of bruschetta topped with olive or truffle pastes, a platter of grilled vegetables dressed with the region’s olive oil, or a selection of the region’s exceptional salumi, or cured meat specialties. The simple frittata is another popular appetizer, flavored with cheese, sauteed greens, fresh herbs, or leftover vegetables. In the spring, fava beans dressed simply with olive oil and Pecorino cheese are often served, while in the fall when olive oil is harvested, antipasti may include Pinzimonio, fresh vegetables dipped in seasoned olive oil, or Fettunta, grilled bread slices drizzled with new olive oil and sprinkled with sea salt.

Probably the most typical Umbrian pasta dish are strangozzi, often served with black truffles, or a spicy tomato sauce from Spoleto. Other pasta dishes include umbricelli in salsa di Trasimeno, a fish based sauce made from lake perch filets, shallots, garlic and chilli pepper. Other heartier pasta dishes include pappardelle alla lepre, (wild hare ragu), seasoned with bacon and cloves, or tomato based sauces made with rabbit or duck.

Umbrian soups tend to be rustic, and include seasonal vegetables, dried beans such as favas, lentils and chickpeas, farro or spelt, and chestnuts. These hearty soups are served simply with a drizzle of good Umbrian olive oil and can take the place of a first course at dinner, or become a main course at lunch.

Umbria is known for an abundance of meat dishes, particularly lamb, pork, and game, either grilled over the fire or cooked on the spit with an abundance of herbs, but is probably most famous for its roast suckling pig. Though typical throughout Central Italy its origins are truly Umbrian. Cooked on the spit in a wood oven, the pig is stuffed with liver, heart and lungs diced with pepper, garlic, salt and wild fennel. Norcia has become so famous for its art of pork butchery and preparation of cured meats, that butchers across Italy now use the term norcino to indicate all kinds of meats preserved in this manner. Visitors to this small city in northern Umbria will be able to savour the extraordinary variety of cured meats, from cojoni di mulo to boar sausages, DOC and IGP denomination Norcia prosciutto, and Ciauscolo, made with the shoulder cut of the pork, bacon and pork fat all minced three times, which is ideal for spreading over bread. Among the region’s most traditional typical main courses is Terni’s colombaccio selvatico, or palomba (turtledove), generally cooked on the spit. The area around Orvieto also specializes in the gallina ubriaca (translated as drunken hen), which is simply chicken cooked in plenty of good Orvieto wine. Specialities from Perugia include roast lamb’s head and Torello alla Perugina. As well as farm reared meats, being a rural region, Umbria is known for its game, and everything from wild boar to wild hare, and even pigeon are prepared in a variety of different methods and can be found on restaurant menus across the region. [...]

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Intact Etruscan tomb unearthed in Tarquinia

Intact Etruscan tomb unearthed in Tarquinia | Italia Mia | Scoop.it

The skeletonized body of an Etruscan prince, possibly a relative to Tarquinius Priscus, the legendary fifth king of Rome from 616 to 579 B.C., has been brought to light in an extraordinary finding that promises to reveal new insights on one of the ancient world’s most fascinating cultures.
Found in Tarquinia, a hill town about 50 miles northwest of Rome, famous for its Etruscan art treasures, the 2,600 year old intact burial site came complete with a full array of precious grave goods.

“It’s a unique discovery, as it is extremely rare to find an inviolate Etruscan tomb of an upper-class individual. It opens up huge study opportunities on the Etruscans,” Alessandro Mandolesi, of the University of Turin, told Discovery News. Mandolesi is leading the excavation in collaboration with the Archaeological Superintendency of Southern Etruria. [...]

As the heavy stone slab was removed, Mandolesi and his team were left breathless. In the small vaulted chamber, the complete skeleton of an individual was resting on a stone bed on the left. A spear lay along the body, while fibulae, or brooches, on the chest indicated that the individual, a man, was probably once dressed with a mantle.
At his feet stood a large bronze basin and a dish with food remains, while the stone table on the right might have contained the incinerated remains of another individual.

Decorated with a red strip, the upper part of the wall featured, along with several nails, a small hanging vase, which might have contained some ointment. A number of grave goods, which included large Greek Corinthian vases and precious ornaments, lay on the floor. [...]

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Do you want to stake a claim in Tuscany's 'last frontier'?

Do you want to stake a claim in Tuscany's 'last frontier'? | Italia Mia | Scoop.it
The postcard-perfect views of Tuscany are an easy sell to British buyers, and with confidence returning people are once again ready to pursue the good life.
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Sicily unveiled (promo 2013)

“Sicily unveiled” - short documentaries series for TV and web, written by Jean Paul Barreaud & Gabriele Gismondi in collaboration with Alessio Algeri (sicilylapse.com). Music by Maurizio Curcio from "Arie di Sicilia" (ariedisicilia.org)

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A romantic, historic apartment and a slice of Italian city life are irresistible to foreign buyers | Tuscan Properties

A romantic, historic apartment and a slice of Italian city life are irresistible to foreign buyers | Tuscan Properties | Italia Mia | Scoop.it

There is a definite movement from the countryside to cities for buyers in Italy, attracted by smaller, easily manageable property.
Foreigners may dream of owning a Tuscan rural idyll but in recent years, once push has come to shove, many have chosen a city location instead — opting for a lifestyle heavy on culture, architecture and art.

So, for example, would you buy an apartment with such stunning view?

This is a renovated apartment in the heart of the historical Sarteano (Si), in an eighteenth century building, with an area of 150 square meters c.ca. and a loft of about 40 square meters.
Overlooking the main square, the apartment is spread over three floors of a building - part of the '400 and the '700 - with beautiful views of the town's main square and the surrounding hills, with views of Mount Cetona. Internally the apartment offers: on the 1st floor is the entrance to the house from which, through an internal staircase floors, you can reach the second level where there is a multipurpose room currently used as a study and a bathroom . Also through an internal staircase once again in handmade terracotta, we reach the third floor of the building where there is a large living room with fireplace and a fully functional gallery which has been made a pleasant accommodation for the master bedroom. From the living room, up a few steps, there is a spacious landing currently used as a wardrobe-dressing room, a bathroom, a living room and a dining room with fireplace and kitchenette. All rooms are very spacious and bright at all hours of the day, with characteristics typical of the old buildings still visible (arches, exposed beams, large windows). The apartment is located close to public car parks free of charge, with views of the town's main square and the Teatro Comunale, all amenities are within walking distance but at the same time you can appreciate the extraordinary isolation from the noise inherent in any city center. Part of furniture and appliances have been tailor-made for the restoration took place recently (about 3 years ago), so they are included in the sale. The apartment has a loft of about 40 square meters used as a laundry room where they were placed the dryer, washing machine and boiler.

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Varenna, the Village on the Lake Como - Lombardy - Italia.it

Varenna, a magnificent fishing village on the shores of Lake Como, dates back to the 11th Century. 
Those that walk its streets and pass by its perfumed gardens can breathe in the air of other times, and those strolling along the nearby lake pathway will be rewarded with a magnificent and romantic panorama.
Castello di Vezio, used by Queen Theodelinda as a lookout point, hovers over Varenna, while a couple of luxe villas also decorate the scene - Villa Cipressi, with its terraced garden, and Villa Monastero, with a 2-kilometer long lakefront garden. The beauty and unique atmosphere of this spectacular lakeside village contribute to its reputation for being both inspirational and relaxing.

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Top 10 Travel Mistakes and How Not to Make Them

Top 10 Travel Mistakes and How Not to Make Them | Italia Mia | Scoop.it

Even the dreamiest of trips can go off the rails when you fall into one of these all-too-common travel traps. We've been there—and we've brought back advice on foolproof booking, smart sightseeing, and making the most of every minute. [...]

Mariano Pallottini's insight:
  • Not booking enough connection time between flights
  • Not applying for your passport early enough
  • Underestimating the location of your hotel from the city center
  • Trying to do too much in one trip
  • Not being honest about your interests, likes, and dislikes
  • Sticking to tourist traps rather than venturing off the beaten path
  • Basing your hotel choice on marketing photos
  • Not reading the entire listing when you're looking to do a short-term apartment or house rental
  • Choosing an outlying airport that's cheaper, but ending up spending more on transportation to your hotel
  • Going to a timeshare sales pitch when you're not in the market to buy
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Agostini: The first Italian motorcycling legend

Agostini: The first Italian motorcycling legend | Italia Mia | Scoop.it

As MotoGP™ descends on Misano for the San Marino Grand Prix, one of its most historical figures will be present, never out of fashion despite having competing in his final race some 36 years ago. Agostini, or ‘Mino’ as he is known by his adoring fans, will be presenting a book charting his time both on the race track and off it.

He’s the most successful rider in the history of the World Championship, with 15 titles and no less than 122 race victories to his name. He was known for eating up the records and, assisted by his image, seemingly establishing with ease his popular reputation both with those involved in motorcycle racing and those looking in - something compatriot Valentino Rossi would repeat some three decades later.

Back in the 60s and 70s, the power of the media – not least television – was not comparable with that of today. Instead, it was the youthful idol himself – an ambassador of Italy and well-known athlete – that was the phenomenon.

Agostini landed himself in the world of motorcycle racing with a determination and clarity in ideas second to none. He hailed from a family that was in no way, shape or form associated with the sport; in fact, his father very much deterred him from the very idea of two-wheel battle. He was eventually convinced by an official, when his son was attempting to sign up for the Trento to Bondone race in which would finish second on a modest Morini 175 Settebello.

The following year, Morini signed up Agostini for the Italian championship, which he would win in 1964, but more importantly he made a guest appearance in the 250 Nations Grand Prix at Monza in which he finished fourth. That grabbed the attention of Count Domenico Agusta, who almost immediately signed him for MV Agusta alongside then reigning 500 World Champion Mike ‘The Bike’ Hailwood.

Ago made his 500 debut in 1965. Back then, it was commonplace for riders to compete in more than one class, so the Italian featured in 350s as well as 500s. His first victory at the terrifying original Nurburgring proved to be the first of three that year and he would finish runner-up to Englishman Hailwood in the 500 ranks.

It was year two of the 500s in which the real Agostini ‘legend’ status began to emerge. Teammate Hailwood left for Honda, leaving Agostini in prime position to tailor MV to his own needs – a truly lethal combination that would lead to a record seven consecutive 500 titles, something not beaten or even matched to this day.

Between 1966 and 1972, the track belonged to Ago. [...]

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Italy's Pantelleria: Erupting with beauty

Italy's Pantelleria: Erupting with beauty | Italia Mia | Scoop.it

The wild, windswept volcanic island of Pantelleria, Italy, — known as the Black Pearl of the Mediterranean — marries beach and mountain vacations like few other places can, with its hot springs of thermal waters on the Big Mountain and unspoiled crystal-blue-green sea waters that beckon sailors and sun worshippers.

It’s beautiful and savage, and attracts travelers looking to relax and unwind from the hustle and bustle of life.

It’s the island on which Ulysses spent seven years loving the nymph Calypso — or so legend has it.

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In search of the light: touring Umbria

In search of the light: touring Umbria | Italia Mia | Scoop.it
During this trip to Umbria we focued more on visiting cities and villages, like Trevi, Orvieto, Todi and Spoleto.
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