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Our Sadness and Flaws Captured In Humorous Cartoons by Angel Boligan

Our Sadness and Flaws Captured In Humorous Cartoons by Angel Boligan | It Matters | Scoop.it
Angel Boligan is one of the best contemporary cartoonist of our time. And that's not just talk – the Cuban artist has won 139 international awards throughout his endless career and has dedicated his whole life to the world of illustration.

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
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How Many Times Should You Repeat Your Messages? | Mr. Media Training

How Many Times Should You Repeat Your Messages? | Mr. Media Training | It Matters | Scoop.it
Spokespersons who change their messages from interview to interview prevent their audiences from understanding, remembering, and acting upon their messages.

 

...Just how many times do you have to repeat your messages in order to achieve your goals? Advertisers rely on the concept of effective frequency to determine the number of times they should run an advertisement. Commercials for simple products with high name recognition might need to be seen only twice to result in a sales increase, whereas ads for less familiar brands might need to be seen nine times.


In the age of media and message oversaturation, those numbers strike me as low. I advise my clients that moving their audiences from unawareness to action requires anywhere from 7 to 15 exposures—and sometimes more....


Via Jeff Domansky
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, December 14, 2013 2:43 PM

Brad Phillips offers key message advice to media interviewees.

Lynn O'Connell for O'Connell Meier's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:11 PM

Ever wondered why you see speakers and talking heads and ad campaigns repeating the same message over and over? Because repetition works!  Remember: no one else is following your content as closely as you do. And, on most platforms, you only reach a fraction of your audience with each post. Repeat your key messages regularly.

Rescooped by Salim ( Zubin ) Shaikh from Tracking the Future
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CRISPR technology leaps from lab to industry

CRISPR technology leaps from lab to industry | It Matters | Scoop.it

Instead of taking prescription pills to treat their ailments, patients may one day opt for genetic 'surgery' — using an innovative gene-editing technology to snip out harmful mutations and swap in healthy DNA.
The system, called CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats), has exploded in popularity in the past year, with genetic engineers, neuroscientists and even plant biologists viewing it as a highly efficient and precise research tool. Now, the gene-editing system has spun out a biotechnology company that is attracting attention from investors as well.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Mapping the World’s Top Facebook Check-in Locations

Mapping the World’s Top Facebook Check-in Locations | It Matters | Scoop.it

One thing that unites Facebook users in Asia, Europe and America: They all love Disneyland, and want everybody to know about it. Four of the top 25 locations that were most checked-in to by Facebook users this year—excluding transportation hubs such as airports—were Disneyland Tokyo, Disneyland Hong Kong, Disneyland Paris and Disneyland California. 

Apart from Disneyland, many of the top places on Facebook’s list were predictable tourist attractions: The Blue Lagoon in Iceland, Piazza San Marco in Venice, the Sharm el-Sheikh resort in Egypt, Las Ramblas in Barcelona.


Via Lauren Moss
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3D structure of HNF-4α reveals new therapeutic opportunities for rare form of inherited diabetes (MODY1)

3D structure of HNF-4α reveals new therapeutic opportunities for rare form of inherited diabetes (MODY1) | It Matters | Scoop.it

The nuclear receptor HNF-4α is an important transcriptional regulator of liver and pancreatic genes and its dysfunction has been linked to maturity-onset diabetes of the young, kidney failure and metabolic syndrome. Fraydoon Rastinejad and colleagues describe a crystal structure of the multidomain HNF-4α homodimer bound to its DNA response element and coactivator-derived peptides. The structure reveals a domain convergence centre connecting multiple domains and serving as an allosteric transmission system for propagating signals between the ligand-binding and DNA-binding domains. The architecture of HNF-4α is compared to the only other known structure of a multidomain nuclear receptor complex, that of PPAR-γ–RXR-α.


Researchers have determined the complete three-dimensional structure of a protein called HNF-4α. HNF-4α controls gene expression in the liver and pancreas, switching genes on or off as needed. People with mature onset diabetes of the young (MODY1) a rare form of the disease, have inherited mutations in the HNF-4α protein. This first-ever look at HNF-4α’s full structure, published in Nature, uncovers new information about how it functions. The study also reveals new pockets in the protein that could be targeted with therapeutic drugs aimed at alleviating MODY1.

 

“Previous structural studies of HNF-4α and related nuclear receptors only revealed smaller, isolated fragments of these proteins,” said Fraydoon Rastinejad, Ph.D., professor in Sanford-Burnham’s Diabetes and Obesity Research Center, located at the Institute’s Lake Nona campus in Orlando, Fla., and senior author of the study.

 

“Because those studies looked only at separate pieces of HNF-4α, many people suspected there was no coordination between different regions of the protein. But we showed those assumptions are incorrect. HNF-4α’s domains are highly organized in a way that has implications for our understanding of MODY1 and the development of treatments for the disease.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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