Issues with the Military and Social Media
197 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Deandra Covington from Military Concerns
Scoop.it!

LinkedIn Boot Camp: The 10 Biggest Mistakes Military Professionals Make On LinkedIn (And How to Avoid Them) - Career Attraction

LinkedIn Boot Camp: The 10 Biggest Mistakes Military Professionals Make On LinkedIn (And How to Avoid Them) - Career Attraction | Issues with the Military and Social Media | Scoop.it

TTransitioning to the civilian workforce? Here are 10 mistakes you need to avoid when it comes to your LinkedIn profile.


Via James Funk
Deandra Covington's insight:

I think the information in here is very useful- for both current active duty, those that are transitioning out, or those that have been out for a while.


When you are in an active duty environment, it's easy to get the sense that you are indispensable in your career. I've heard- " it's the military, which means they can't fire me". WRONG. While it might take a little more time than a non-military job to kick you to the curb, there is always the possibility that you won't be allowed to re-enlist or they will transition you out due to cutbacks. Because of this, your job connections should always remain open. You should be ready in this digital age, so you should get a LinkedIn profile ready since company recruiters almost always will look you up (even if you did not apply for a job on LinkedIn). 


Also, the pride that people feel after serving in the military can make it seem like they are not prepared for the civilian work life. Employers want to know that you are ready to take on what they have waiting for you, and that you are not living in the past. Having your resume contain all the military acronym jibberish or having your LinkedIn picture be one of you in uniform can send this perception. Be proud, you have reasons to be, but show that you are adaptable to a different environment as well. 


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deandra Covington
Scoop.it!

The Social Ops Vlog - Episode 4 - Military Social Media Idiots?

The main point I took away from this vlog episode was their belief that social media problems in the military is a 90/10 issue. That is, the issue is 90% a human resources issue (recruitment, initial and continuing education). 10% of the issue accounts for individuals that will not hesitate to post or tweet despite education as well as actions that are non-preventable including pictures that could be taken out of context. Interesting perspective, but I believe the 10% should be closer to 20-30%. As a prior military service person, the military is bombarded with various trainings that are all very important, but become easy to "click through" due to the prominence of CBTs (computer-based training). In this fourth edition Nicole and David discuss how damaging inappropriate posting of content by military personnel can be and maybe what remedies are availa...
Deandra Covington's insight:

The main point I took away from this vlog episode was their belief that social media problems in the military is a 90/10 issue. That is, the issue is 90% a human resources issue (recruitment, initial and continuing education). 10% of the issue accounts for individuals that will not hesitate to post or tweet despite education as well as actions that are non-preventable including pictures that could be taken out of context. Interesting perspective, but I believe the 10% should be closer to 20-30%. As a prior military service person, the military is bombarded with various trainings that are all very important, but become easy to "click through" due to the prominence of CBTs (computer-based training). 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deandra Covington from Littlebytesnews Current Events
Scoop.it!

National Guard soldier suspended over ‘distasteful’ military funeral photos and comments

National Guard soldier suspended over ‘distasteful’ military funeral photos and comments | Issues with the Military and Social Media | Scoop.it

Stars and Stripes originally shared: National Guard soldier suspended over ‘distasteful’ military funeral photos and comments

A Wisconsin National Guard servicemember who posted controversial photos and comments regarding military funerals on social media, including one photo caption that read, ‘We put the FUN in [military] funerals — your fearless honor guard from various states’, has been suspended pending the outcome of an ongoing investigation, the Wisconsin Department of Military Affairs said in a press release Tuesday.

The photos and comments appeared on the Instagram page of Spc. Terry Harrison, a member of the Madison, Wis.-based 1st Battalion, 147th Aviation Regiment. Harrison has since been removed from the funeral honors detail indefinitely, according to the Wisconsin DMA.

Read more at: http://www.stripes.com/news/us/national-guard-soldier-suspended-over-distasteful-military-funeral-photos-and-comments-1.268422


Via littlebytesnews
Deandra Covington's insight:

This story explains some details about one of (many) examples of social media usage that causes the military great disgrace. In this incident, a National Guard soldier and funeral detailer both posted pictures of her and group of funeral servicemen and women doing a goofy pose next to a flagged casket and put a picture on Instagram complaining about doing a funeral in the cold and implied that the family would receive a less than acceptable folded falag. Because of the way social media works, instead of these incidences being confined to one area (the inappropriate poster's command arena) it becomes a national concern.In other words, instead of this National Guard member's lower level supervisors and commander taking care of any necessary disciplinary and guidance, the swift action and  sharing of the nation brought the concern to the attention of the Chief of National Guard Bureau in the Pentagon. Because of this, this member is suspended and has quite probably lost any ability to stay in the military and learn from her mistakes.While I am not disagreeing with her leadership's decision of removing her from her funeral responsibilities or that she is not deserving of wearing a uniform people have died for, I just want to point out that social media mess-ups can most definitely be career-enders.

more...
littlebytesnews's curator insight, February 18, 2014 8:26 PM

Sad anyone would make a mockery of a funeral just to show off on social media. Idiots...

Rescooped by Deandra Covington from New Media PA
Scoop.it!

Wars, the Military and Social Media: A Sticky Wicket

Wars, the Military and Social Media: A Sticky Wicket | Issues with the Military and Social Media | Scoop.it

Wouldn’t surprise me a bit then if someday – at least in the U.S. – we’ll also see a Secretary of Virtual Defence.


Via FM
Deandra Covington's insight:

This blogger describes the real time implications of utilizing social media while in combat locations. "Geotagging" is the ability for social media providers to determine the users exact location via their GPS capabilities. It also describes in some detail that while historically Taliban forces did not use social media outlets, such as Twitter, it is much more common in recent years. They utilize the service as a way to promote their ideals and to communicate with one another. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deandra Covington from Social governance
Scoop.it!

How social media is rewriting the rules of modern warfare | msoftnews

How social media is rewriting the rules of modern warfare | msoftnews | Issues with the Military and Social Media | Scoop.it
This obviously has marketing and propaganda value, but that isn't the only way this modern media campaign is changing the nature of military strategy: since social-media tools are inherently difficult to regulate and are ...

Via Dionne Lew
Deandra Covington's insight:

The article begins by describing the social media tactics that Israel used during its campaign in  2012 against Hamas. They were live tweeting events of an attack and posting photos and graphs on Instagram and Tumblr. While doing this, they were reminding Israeli citizens not to report on social media forums any details of movement from the Israeli army. They justified this by saying sending broad messages were much different than sending specific messages on troops. They tie this in to the much older term for inappropriate sharing of information "Loose lips sink ships". I liked this blog post, because it eloquently describes of keeping the online world at bay during war. 


"And while the Israeli military may think that it is somehow controlling the flow of information with its live-blog or its Twitter account or its Tumblr propaganda campaign, it is just one stream in a giant ocean of data flowing from individuals who are both observing and participating in the attacks — including soldiers who are posting photos of themselves to Instagram and Facebook, pictures of drone missions that are being aggregated through a site called Dronestagram, and many other similar examples. Everything that is geo-tagged becomes a potential source of crucial information about the Israeli action and the response by Hamas." 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deandra Covington from Social Media Article Sharing
Scoop.it!

Group shames soldiers for 'inappropriate' social media posts - Al Jazeera America (blog)

Group shames soldiers for 'inappropriate' social media posts - Al Jazeera America (blog) | Issues with the Military and Social Media | Scoop.it
Al Jazeera America (blog) Group shames soldiers for 'inappropriate' social media posts Al Jazeera America (blog) A new Facebook page called "Military Social Media Idiots" has begun sharing the social media posts of service members that it believes...

Via Alan Horton
Deandra Covington's insight:

There is a Facebook page dedicated to soldier's social media blunders. It is called "Military Social Media Idiots". If you decide to visit the page, just be warned there is foul language and some photos that are inappropriate. This blogger asks the perfect question to the logic of the page. How it it helping military image by putting these images on a shaming forum? Doesn't that just ensure it will be circulated and shared even more? While I think it is the military way sometimes to "make an example" out of someone, I feel that the military could better use these examples in training on what NOT to do, but this should be done in an internal way and not on a Facebook page. It adds more fuel to the fire. 


more...
No comment yet.