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The Dunedin Study: The examined life - New Zealand Listener

The Dunedin Study: The examined life - New Zealand Listener | Psychology | Scoop.it
Longitudinal studies that follow a group of people from cradle to grave can provide valuable insight and change policy.
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Rescooped by gaye bloomfield from Everyone is born with evil, some more than others
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The Neurobiology of Evil | Going Mental | Big Think

The Neurobiology of Evil | Going Mental | Big Think | Psychology | Scoop.it

Murderers and other violent criminals have been shown to have amygdalae that are smaller or that don’t function properly. Amygdalae allows an individual to respond to the facial expressions of others, as well as promotes a moral system. When it isn't working properly people are more likely to do evil things.  7 specific genes have been identified that are linked to antisocial or aggressive behavior and are thought to organize how brain growth is structured:  MAOA, 5HTT, BDNF, NOTCH4, NCAM, tlx, and Pet-1-ETS


Via alli
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Rescooped by gaye bloomfield from Empathy and Compassion
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Roots and Collapse of Empathy

Roots and Collapse of Empathy | Psychology | Scoop.it
Spanning from care-giving infants and civilian rescuers risking their life to the collapse of empathy in agents of torture and extinction, this unique book deals with and illustrates the altruistic best and atrocious worst of human nature.


It begins with infant roots of empathy, then turns to the neurosocial support of empathic participation, and to the nature and nurture of good and ill.


It raises questions about how abuse may invite vicious circles of re-enactment, and as to how ordinary people may come to commit torture and mass murders, such as the Auschwitz doctors and the sole terrorist attacking Norway on July 22, 2011.


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Is the demise of empathy responsible for an increase in crime?
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Rescooped by gaye bloomfield from Amazing Science
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Brains on Trial: Determine criminal fate based on high-tech images of the brain

Brains on Trial: Determine criminal fate based on high-tech images of the brain | Psychology | Scoop.it
What if we could peer into a brain and see guilt or innocence? Brain scanning technology is trying to break its way into the courtroom, but can we—and should we—determine criminal fate based on high-tech images of the brain?


Join a distinguished group of neuroscientists and legal experts who will debate how and if neuroscience should inform our laws and how we treat criminals. This World Science Festival program is based on a two-part PBS special, “Brains on Trial with Alan Alda,” which aired on September 11 and 18, 2013, supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, December 30, 2013 10:32 AM

Although this may be possible there is always the chance it could be wrong and then we have Vanilla Sky.

Rescooped by gaye bloomfield from Nature versus Nurture
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'Identical Strangers' Explore Nature Vs. Nurture : NPR

'Identical Strangers' Explore Nature Vs. Nurture : NPR | Psychology | Scoop.it
Paula Bernstein and Elyse Schein were both adopted as infants. They met for the first time when they were 35 years old. That's when they discovered they are identical twins — separated at adoption and subjects in a secret research project.

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Maya Woodall's comment, May 1, 2013 12:10 AM
Label: Article 3-Identical Strangers
Jonny Vitz's curator insight, October 13, 2014 7:19 PM

scoooop

 

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Gay brains structured like those of the opposite sex - life - 16 June 2008 - New Scientist

Gay brains structured like those of the opposite sex - life - 16 June 2008 - New Scientist | Psychology | Scoop.it
Brain scans have provided the most compelling evidence yet that being gay or straight is a biologically fixed trait
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Cocaine-triggered brain changes reversed in rodents - health - 11 April 2006 - New Scientist

Cocaine-triggered brain changes reversed in rodents - health - 11 April 2006 - New Scientist | Psychology | Scoop.it
A strategy to reverse the brain changes triggered by cocaine - which lead to addiction - may have been uncovered by experiments in mice
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2011 preview: Crunch time for stem cells - health - 30 December 2010 - New Scientist

2011 preview: Crunch time for stem cells - health - 30 December 2010 - New Scientist | Psychology | Scoop.it
Trials of therapies to treat paralysis and blindness could reveal the therapeutic potential of human embryonic stem cells
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Rescooped by gaye bloomfield from emerging learning
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How Evernote Works Like Your Memory: An Interview with Maureen Ritchey, Cognitive Neuroscientist

How Evernote Works Like Your Memory: An Interview with Maureen Ritchey, Cognitive Neuroscientist | Psychology | Scoop.it

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WatchKnowLearn - Free K-12 educational videos

WatchKnowLearn - Free K-12 educational videos | Psychology | Scoop.it
Free K-12 educational videos … organized. Tens of thousands of excellent, educational videos in a huge, intuitive directory. Organized, reviewed, rated, and described by teachers. Ideal as a supplement to a curriculum or for independent study.
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The Brain—Lesson 3—Drugs Change the Way Neurons Communicate (Page 1 of 2)

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Neuroplasticity: Digital Stress and Your Brain

Neuroplasticity: Digital Stress and Your Brain | Psychology | Scoop.it
Neuroplasticity: Digital Stress and Your Brain http://t.co/jihCNhQ1...
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Rescooped by gaye bloomfield from Psychology A2
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Monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA) predicts behavioral aggression following provocation


Via Robin Banerjee, Andrea McDougall
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Rescooped by gaye bloomfield from Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
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The Extreme Warrior gene: a reality check

The Extreme Warrior gene: a reality check | Psychology | Scoop.it
by Alondra Oubré MAOA — Genetic culprit for violence? Theories about inborn race-based aggression, violence, and criminality are back in the news [1]. In the ongoing search for genes underlying soc...

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Rescooped by gaye bloomfield from End of the line
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Law and order: Blame it on the brain

Law and order: Blame it on the brain | Psychology | Scoop.it
Advances in neuroscience could transform our criminal justice systems. But the jury is out as to whether "my brain made me do it" will ever be accepted in court.

 

Grady Nelson had his life spared by a brain scan. In January 2005, after he was released from a Florida prison, where he had served time for the rape of his step-daughter, he returned home to stab his wife 60 times, slash her throat and slam a butcher’s knife into her head. He also stabbed his two stepchildren. The kids survived the attack, but his wife did not. Five years later, a jury in Miami voted against the death sentence for Nelson’s crimes. Instead, they narrowly voted to sentence him to life in prison.

The defence attorneys argued that Nelson had major brain defects that could explain his behaviour. To show this, they submitted as evidence brain activity measurements from a method known as a quantitative EEG (Q-EEG). In a standard EEG, electrodes placed on the scalp measure the electrical activity of the brain. The Q-EEG is similar, except that a computer analyses the data and identifies brain regions of unusual activity. Lawyers had previously tried without success to present such data in court, but this was the first time in the US that a judge presiding over a major case had allowed it.

Clearly, it did the trick. In comments to the press, John Howard, an airport fleet services worker and member of the jury, said he had been about to vote for execution when the Q-EEG evidence had reversed his decision. “The technology really swayed me,” he told a Miami newspaper. “After seeing the brain scans, I was convinced this guy had some sort of brain problem.”

Neuroscientific evidence is increasingly being introduced into legal courts around the world, and novel brain-imaging techniques and interpretations are at the forefront. These approaches may be powerful new tools that help juries and judges determine the culpability of an accused and identify serial criminals. It’s also beginning to influence the way society thinks about sentencing and the treatment of criminals. But learning more about the neurobiological underpinnings of behaviour is also raising uncomfortable questions about free will. On top of all that there are scores of scientists who are critical of the use of such evidence in court.


Via Kenneth Rowe
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Rescooped by gaye bloomfield from Nature vs Nurture in Criminality
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Sr.Proj Nature vs. Nurture: Serial Killers


Via Mikaela van Dijk
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Mindfulness may enhance PTSD treatment | Psychiatry

Mindfulness may enhance PTSD treatment | Psychiatry | Psychology | Scoop.it
Psychiatry | Mindfulness interventions are safe, inexpensive and effective adjuncts to posttraumatic stress disorder treatment, according to Marina Khusid, MD, ND, MSA, who recently published an article on the subject in the July issue of...
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Sign in to read: A DIY guide to improving your brain - 14 March 2012 - New Scientist

Sign in to read: A DIY guide to improving your brain - 14 March 2012 - New Scientist | Psychology | Scoop.it
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Sign in to read: Omega-3: Fishy claims for fish oil - health - 20 May 2010 - New Scientist

Sign in to read: Omega-3: Fishy claims for fish oil - health - 20 May 2010 - New Scientist | Psychology | Scoop.it
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How Google Affects Our Memory [Infographic]

How Google Affects Our Memory [Infographic] | Psychology | Scoop.it
I remember back towards the beginning of the year when Chris Pirillo and Danny Brown both wrote articles about how social media is, in a sense, making us l...

 

neuroplasticity

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Michael Merzenich: Growing evidence of brain plasticity | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Neuroscientist Michael Merzenich looks at one of the secrets of the brain's incredible power: its ability to actively re-wire itself. He's researching ways to harness the brain's plasticity to enhance our skills and recover lost function.
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Rescooped by gaye bloomfield from Neuroscience for Regular Folk
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Willy Chyr | Neurons in Balloons

Willy Chyr | Neurons in Balloons | Psychology | Scoop.it

This is just too cool for words. 


Via Dawn Groves
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