Issues in Curatorial Practice
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The Politics of Identity for Korean Women Artists Living in Britain

The Politics of Identity for Korean Women Artists Living in Britain | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it

Identity is not about certainty, whether of nation, gender, race, or the other. It is the way we choose to place ourselves in relation to how others choose to place us, at certain times, in given places and spaces. Rather than focusing on identity politics it is useful to address the politics of identity as a force driving the way we think about culture and the manner in which culture becomes manifested in our lives. Culture is always in flux and different constants reach out and intersect with others, creating fresher fusions of imagination and experience. In a globalized world we often observe these intersections as products of migration. This article aims to explore some of the consequences and manifestations of migration in respect to Korean artists’ oeuvres within Britain. I try to avoid canonizing these artworks in terms of their specific national identity, their Koreanness. I do nevertheless explore the relevance of identity as a grounding force, arguing that issues that have been categorized as Identity Politics are still of particular relevance to artists from South Korea, a nation which was preoccupied with a move towards democratization until 1989. However, I also suggest that the Western-centred discourse of identity politics cannot be neatly transposed to discussions of Korean identity and that this reality is relevant to artists’ awareness and explorations of their own identity as individuals in a globalized world.

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ICI’s 2016 Independent Vision Curatorial Award Nominees - Posts - Independent Curators International

ICI’s 2016 Independent Vision Curatorial Award Nominees - Posts - Independent Curators International | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it
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Àsìkò Addis Ababa | e-flux

Àsìkò Addis Ababa | e-flux | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it
CCA, Lagos is pleased to present the 6th and final edition—in this format—of its international pedagogical and curatorial programme, Àsìkò. Begun in 2010 out of the need to build infrastructure—physical and intellectual—it provides support locally, regionally and continentally in a framework that explores and advances the critical methodologies and histories that underpin artistic and curatorial practice. Using the format of part art laboratory, part residency and part informal art academy, over the course of 35 intensive days Àsìkò, 2016 Addis Ababa has focused on technique and methodology, critical thinking, and the aesthetic implementation of conceptual ideas.
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Endless Circulation | e-flux

Endless Circulation | e-flux | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it
TarraWarra Biennial 2016: Endless Circulation is co-curated by TarraWarra Director, Victoria Lynn, and co-founder of contemporary art journal Discipline, Helen Hughes. The collaboration takes as its starting point the shared structuring principles of biennial exhibitions and periodical publications. It brings together over 20 new artworks by contemporary Australian artists around the themes of making-public, iteration or edition, and circulation.
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The Open Works of Felix Gonzalez-Torres

The Open Works of Felix Gonzalez-Torres | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it
LONDON — Every time Gonzalez-Torres’s work is exhibited, a critical opportunity arises.
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Minoo Emami's "War Collection" covered in the Harvard Gazette

Minoo Emami's "War Collection" covered in the Harvard Gazette | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it
Minoo Emami's exhibit "War Collection" is on display through August 19, 2015 at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Room 102 (sculpture) and CGIS Knafel, Fisher Family Commons (paintings).See it on Scoop.it, via Issues in Curatorial Practice
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Three Museums Come Together to Tell a History of African American Art

Three Museums Come Together to Tell a History of African American Art | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it
MUSKEGON, Mich. — Common Ground, the Muskegon Museum of Art’s (MMA) current exhbition of African American art, combines works from three regional Michigan collections: the Muskegon museum, the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts (KIA), and the Flint Institute of Arts (FIA). Since last fall it has been on a tour of those cities, all of which have high percentages of African American residents. Flint, in particular, has a majority black population, whose disenfranchisement has received international attention recently due to the poisoning of the city’s water supply. Like the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA), the museums in those three cities have worked for several decades to collect and exhibit art that reflects their populations’ racial and ethnic demographics. Because these institutions lack the wealth and prestige of their siblings in New York, Miami, Los Angeles, and other places, the collecting process has been gradual, the scale of works acquired is relatively modest, and their achievements haven’t garnered headlines. The slow, organic development of these collections stands in contrast to the recent explosive growth in major museums acquiring African American art, as reported in the New York Times last November. The lower profile of works in Common Ground is especially evident when compared to the visual brio of the show from the Rubell Family Collection that was recently presented at the DIA (and opens in mid-March at the Cincinnati Art Museum). Furthermore, many of the artists in Common Ground lived and worked decades ago: their extant pieces are more traditional in terms of format and materials and potentially fewer and farther between. Some of them are also regionalists who never achieved the high profiles of the artists now recognized by the Times and the Rubells. Yet Common Ground will open the eyes of visitors, African American and otherwise, who might not realize how deep the roots of art by black painters and sculptors in this country actually run. The exhibition features about 60 paintings, sculptures, and works on paper that span some 200 years of American history, from the very early 19th century through the present. It’s divided into five themes that link to issues tackled by many black artists: “Gaining Access,” “New Self-Awareness,” “Political and Social Expressions,” “Examining Identities,” and “Towards Abstraction.” The earliest piece on view is a small portrait, painted circa 1810 by Joshua Johnson. The MMA acquired it in 1998, when Dr. Anita Herald, a long-time advocate for diversity in the museum’s collection, located it and helped rally a group of local patrons to contribute to its purchase. Typical of Johnson’s work, it depicts a white subject, a man named Thomas Boyle. The challenges that Johnson faced because of his race are clearly explicated by a display of scans of his manumission papers, placed next to the painting’s more traditional wall label. Joining Johnson’s painting are small oils by Edward Mitchell Bannister and Grafton Tyler Brown, all of which provide material evidence of the artists having gained at least some access to the world of professional training and recognition. But the standouts in the section are a classically styled figural sculpture by Edmonia Lewis and a large oil painting by Henry Ossawa Tanner. Relative to other pieces by Lewis, this one, “Marriage of Hiawatha” (1892), is small —about 30 inches tall. (It was acquired by the Kalamazoo museum in 2010.) It was carved from what’s likely Carrara marble that Lewis would have obtained during time spent in Italy. An artist of African American and Native American descent, Lewis here addresses a subject who was invented by an Anglo-American poet to fit into narratives about a noble and vanishing race. It thus becomes a testament to her own heritages and an ironic commentary on the convoluted measures that white culture has taken to live with the destruction it wreaks. In spite of such baggage, however, the work is a tender depiction of conjugal love. Tanner’s “The Holy Family” (1910) has long been a centerpiece of the Muskegon collection. It was purchased in 1911, one year prior to the museum’s opening to the public, at the time representing the institution’s commitment to buying contemporary art. Since the late 1960s, when museums were first prodded to reflect social diversity, it has come to be viewed as part of a collection of African American art and the work of an artist who chose to live in France, rather than face race-based persecution in the United States. Measuring about 35 by 40 inches and painted in soothing blues and greens, it depicts father, mother, and infant in an interior that’s decidedly Middle Eastern — a reference that counters Westernized depictions of Biblical subjects, and one that Tanner took pains to achieve. The exhibition presents the next theme, “New Self-Awareness,” as growing out of the impact of the New Negro and Negritude movements. This is evidenced in two other works from the Muskegon collection — Richmond Barthé’s “Feral Benga” and Loïs Mailou Jones’s “Cabaret Singer.” Cast in 1937, the Barthé was purchased by the museum in 1940, with the intention that it serve as the kernel of a new sculpture collection. Given that Jones also lived and worked in Paris in 1937, her undated pastel portrait might be from the same period, although it was not purchased until 2005. The subject of Barthé’s piece is François Benga, a native of Senegal who often partnered with the American dancer Josephine Baker in sexually charged Parisian nightclub acts between the wars. The fully nude and sensuously swooning figure is especially charismatic, given the undeniable homoeroticism — a dimension of Barthé’s work that’s only recently begun to receive critical attention. The Jones portrait conveys a sense of powerful, individual personality, but without sexual overtones. Bigger artworks enter the field in the third section, “Political and Social Expressions,” likely because of their intended rhetorical function. Hughie Lee-Smith’s large, stark 1987 canvas “L’Apres Midi” is a surreal expression of alienation. Acquired by the Muskegon museum in 2012, it depicts a boy striding past a row of cast concrete blocks that are placed along a beach. He swings a blanket that’s the same dark blue as the nearby water. The boy’s frozen gesture takes on a note of defiance, but nothing really is happening here; all seems stopped in time. Like other examples of Smith’s most powerful paintings, this one weaves a spell that’s sad and vaguely sinister. This section also features two works by Elizabeth Catlett. The first is a 1981 cast of her iconic bronze head “Glory,” the second a linocut of the same subject: the dancer Glory Van Scott. The bronze is probably Catlett’s best-known sculpture and justifiably so, thanks to the beauty of her subject and the simplicity of her portrayal. The linocut is a fuller-figure image, deftly delineated with an economy of means that rivals Matisse. Both were acquired after Dr. Herald challenged the Muskegon museum to better reflect its community. Most of the acquisitions made since that moment in the late 1990s reflect an impressively diverse range of support for African American art, including from artists. For example, after the MMA added works by Detroit artist Charles McGee — also represented here by an expressionistic portrait painting from the Flint collection — he suggested to Felrath Hines’s widow, Dorothy Fisher, that she place some of her late husband’s pictures with the Muskegon museum. As a result, she made a gift of works reflecting Hines’s various approaches to abstraction. I don’t know the history of the Flint and Kalamazoo collections well enough to say if they’ve been built as organically as that in Muskegon. My sense from Common Ground is that Flint officials have gone about their acquisitions more strategically, with an eye towards artists who are readily identified with the contemporary market. If that’s the case, however, it’s a strategy that has been in place for over a decade, as the span of acquisition dates here suggests. This microcosmic sampling includes: One of Chakaia Booker’s phantasmagoric tire sculptures, which seems to be writhing and sliding off of its pedestal, dated 2001, acquired 2002 A silhouetted vignette by Kara Walker — a linocut rather than a cutout, and small enough to be framed under glass — dated 1997, purchased 2005 A small, half-figure sculpture by Kehinde Wiley, cast in marble dust and resin, dated 2006, purchased 2007 A vivid screenprint of a quilt by Mary Lee Bendolph of Gee’s Bend, commissioned by the FIA in 2010 A downright elegant, tone-on-tone wall assemblage by Thornton Dial, dated 1994, acquired 2013 These works appear, among others, in the last two segments of the show — “Examining Identities” and “Towards Abstraction” — and it’s here that the exhibition’s goal of teaching history comes into overt conflict with its potential for visitors to learn by observing and considering visual relationships. I realize that abstraction or art without a more explicit subject matter can be tricky to place in exhibitions whose purpose is engaging with identity. But taking abstraction out of chronological context and treating it like an alien approach to black American art-making — as Common Ground does — distorts the story being told here. For example, much of Hines’s art, which appears in the final section, predates many of the figural works on view. The quilts that the Bendolph print reflects — also shoehorned into the last part of the show — have been made for generations as an expression of cultural identity. Even within the context of the more understandable chronological narrative of the exhibition, rich potential relationships get lost. Wiley and Booker belong to different generations, but they’re both producing art now. If their pieces were placed in closer proximity, the visitor could more easily see how his “Bust of St. Francis of St. Adelaide” and her “India Blue” say all kinds of things about sculptures’ relationship with pedestals — the latter (Booker) looking like it wants to escape from its perch, the former (Wiley) incorporating its own little pedestal, while being placed, jewel-like, inside a vitrine. Or what if the Wiley and Edmonia Lewis pieces were positioned nearer each other? After all, Wiley makes references to often highly fictionalized and heroic depictions from the past; so does the Lewis. But Lewis made her work herself, whereas Wiley does not. How might that realization affect the way visitors think about the process of making art, how much of it is about idea and how much about execution? Two artists represented in Common Ground also have works currently on view in the MMA’s permanent collection galleries, where they’re shown in a context that’s (purposefully) much broader than the exhibition. What holds this constantly rotating space together is that works are placed in jostling formal relationships with one another. The vivid coloration and patterns of a painting by Winfred Rembert highlight the similar elements in Edward Hopper’s nearby New York restaurant scene — even as the painting’s subjects also complement each other. For the sake of still recognizing their cultural roots, however, the Rembert and other works by African American artists are given labels that identify them as such. Creating formal groupings that divorce objects from their origins goes against most of the tenets of new art history and curatorial practice — but it also permits fresh perceptions that free works from pigeonholing. Common Ground is a worthwhile and eye-opening exhibition. But even within its strict focus on identity, it could have been more creatively organized — more encouraging of artistic dialogue and less interested in a unidirectional telling of history. Common Ground continues at the Muskegon Museum of Art (296 W Webster Avenue, Muskegon, Michigan) through March 20. Get Hyperallergic in your Inbox! Subscribe to our email newsletter. (Daily or Weekly)
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How to use the F-word in 2016: The Guerrilla Girls Twin Cities Takeover | ART21 Magazine

How to use the F-word in 2016: The Guerrilla Girls Twin Cities Takeover | ART21 Magazine | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it
Sitting outside the Department Head’s office at Minneapolis College of Art & Design I was nervous, clearly unaccustomed to sounds and vibes of academia. I felt like an imposter. For more than two decades I had worked in the field as a curator, writer, and art administrator. Somehow by the time I left the building I had agreed to teach a course in Gender, Art & Society and help plan a Guerrilla Girls project for MCAD. In a way it was a bit familiar. From 2008 to 2009, I had organized an all-Ireland Guerrilla Girls project. The newly commissioned work—and the statistics that backed up the research—confirmed what we knew about sexism in Ireland while also providing a space for discussion about the state of women in the arts. We also observed the role of artistic collectives, the power of art activism, how process was as important as the end result (the art object), and the role that feminist art methodologies played (and plays) in what we understand as contemporary practice today. These ideas—the power of socially engaged art, the history and legacy of feminist tactics and methods of making art, and the collective consciousness found in art activism—all were at the core of every Guerrilla Girls project I’d worked on: the Girls in Ireland, teaching at MCAD, and what would become the Guerrilla Girls Takeover, happening across Minnesota from now until March. The process for organizing the Takeover was intentionally non-hierarchical and inclusive—aiming to bring three big museums together while also allowing for grassroots participation. The methodology of prioritizing process eventually became a core principle for the Guerrilla Girls project in the Twin Cities. Lead by an adventurous steering committee representing a wide range of cultural institutions and independent curatorial voices, our aim is to open up political and dialogical space to answer questions like: What does or will the Fourth Wave of Feminism look like? How can collective action and art activism impact the political consciousness today, especially with young people? How can we utilize the history, integrity and energy of the Guerrilla Girls to attempt to answer these questions? I first heard of the Guerrilla Girls while studying art history at the University of Minnesota in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The group served as a beacon of intelligent, socially engaged political art that spoke to a broad layer of young women (and men) dedicating their lives to art. Importantly, the activist art movement included artists and others who were engaging in an art practice that “had something to say.” Some of the exhibitions in Minneapolis that I worked on as a tour guide and intern during this time included artists Carrie Mae Weams, Lorna Simpson, political posters from the former USSR, Helio Oiticica, and Jacob Lawrence. Artists such as Jenny Holzer and Magdalena Abakanowicz were commissioned to create sculptures for the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden, and I researched them for the first audio guide at Walker Art Center. Frank Gehry built his first museum, the Weisman Art Museum, encouraging us all to see and think differently about art and architecture. Griselda Pollock was a visiting scholar at UofM, and many of us studied with her, where she not only expanded our knowledge of feminist art criticism, but also encouraged activism in our academic pursuits. There were also several gigs by the punk group the Riot Grrls at First Avenue, where music, art and politics collided every weekend. For those of us who were studying art and art history and volunteering and working in local museums and galleries, the Guerrilla Girls and artists like those mentioned above encouraged activism in the spaces where we believed meaning, value and understanding was being constructed—in art practice, universities and museums. We saw art as a way of creating meaningful dialogue, and it had the capacity to reflect and influence thinking in society. We believed that activism in art was essential. This time was decisive (not seminal…the Girls discourage that word…) in my curatorial practice. Twenty-five years later we now are at a point when the ideas embodied in feminism are at once institutionalized and co-opted by the art establishment, and yet are more important than ever. For more than three decades the Guerrilla Girls have served as agents of provocation, using humor to push boundaries and pose demonstrative facts and figures that challenge the patriarchal, hetero-centric [art] world. Yet how does the Guerrilla Girls’ process-led practice of a collective, statistic-driven and advertising-orientated aesthetic work within a post-Feminist context? Well, it’s complicated; and in a way the artwork doesn’t work because it’s not about the art—it’s about the dialogical process; it’s about awareness and change. And the collaborative process is hard, uncontrollable, fraught with angst, and—for those of us that embrace it—highly impactful. We know that the notion of a non-binary spectrum of complicated definitions of gender is part of the context of living and creating in 2016. My MCAD students taught me that. I wonder, though, if we/they understand how we got here? Does the Millennial generation, one particularly concerned with transgender issues that question the language and motivations of the Guerrilla Girls, understand that they sit on the socio-political space that activists like the Girls and others fought for? We are not a post-racial or post-feminist world. Yes, important changes have been made and gains have been won, but we are far from equality. Yet shockingly, we seem to be even farther from the intelligent, dialogical critiques necessary to move beyond a 60-letter retort or an internet troll comment. A click-and-go-pseudo-dialogue without consequences, accountability or integrity has now seemed to replace the “normal” way of dialoguing about art. But I expect more; I expect intelligent debate with progressive arguments that push the boundaries of understanding and ideas. When I first heard about the critiques of the Guerrilla Girls in Minneapolis in 2015, I was excited; ecstatic in fact. This was just what we wanted—dialogical space to continue to push the boundaries of the discussion. The project was never to make the Guerrilla Girls a spectacle or artist-genius (it’s hard to even write that phrase it’s so ridiculous). The project, again, was to talk about what kind of feminism was needed today. In Ireland we often heard: “I’m not a feminist, but if I was this is what I would complain about.” The answer? We are still waiting for more dialogue; we will get that in the next few months. It has begun and some the answers will come. Yes, it’s that simple but it is also not that easy. What we do have are hundreds, if not thousands, of people and more than thirty groups, organizations, and institutions who have emphatically and energetically joined in the Guerrilla Girls Twin Cities Takeover. We will examine these questions and debate and argue – and then reflect. Do you need more proof that the feminism prophesied by the Girls is still needed? Still wanted? Ask us at the end of March… we might know more then. Formed in 1985, the Guerrilla Girls were influenced by the political movements of the 1960s and 1970s in the US, and were a part of the opposition to the backlash against the Feminist movement and, later, central to the dialogue responding to issues in post-Feminism and art. The Guerrilla Girls explore subjects like politics, film, and popular culture, feminism and fashion, and the attempt to achieve sexual and racial equality, calling themselves the ‘Conscience of the art world.’ They wear gorilla masks in public to conceal their identities, and place the focus on issues rather than personalities, working collectively and anonymously to produce posters, films, billboards, public actions, books and other projects.
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A Los Angeles Mega-Gallery Opens with Museum Ambitions

A Los Angeles Mega-Gallery Opens with Museum Ambitions | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it
LOS ANGELES — Hauser Wirth & Schimmel, the local outpost of mega-gallery Hauser & Wirth, will open its massive hybrid art space to the public on Sunday. Located on the site of a 100-year-old flour mill in LA’s downtown Arts District, the complex will include exhibition spaces, a restaurant, bookstore, central courtyard, a book and printed matter lab, even a public park. This all-encompassing approach aims to provide what curator and gallery partner Paul Schimmel described during yesterday’s press preview as “something that I think LA has long wished for and needed, a kind of seamless urban experience that doesn’t separate life from art.” Encompassing seven buildings and stretching between 3rd and 2nd streets, the complex sprawls across 116,000 square feet, just 4,000 fewer than the Broad Museum a couple of miles to the west. The renovation by Creative Space, LA and Annabelle Selldorf makes for a dynamic experience, as visitors progress from white cube to sun-drenched atrium and into rough-hewn warehouse galleries, while smaller, more intimate rooms allow you to catch your breathe. The debut exhibition, Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947–2016, is a knockout revisionist survey featuring almost 100 works by 34 artists created over the past 70 years. Challenging the popular art historical premise that male painters were creating the most important work of the mid 20th century, the show aims to refocus attention on both sculpture and female artists. The exhibition begins in a pristine, light-filled gallery where works by pioneering artists like Louise Bourgeois and Louise Nevelson can be seen next to those by less well-known contemporaries like Ruth Asawa, whose organic wire hangings are one of the room’s highlights. Another is a series of six grim and grimy constructions by Lee Bontecou, an artist who is often cited but rarely seen, and whose steel and canvas works must be experienced in person. Leaving this space, you cross the central courtyard, where Jackie Windsor’s “30 to 1 Bound Trees” towers over you. This work, a recreation of a piece originally produced in Nova Scotia in the early 1970s, draws on movements of the era like Land Art and Minimalism, while at the same time recalling an ancient and earth-centered mysticism. In the building on the far side of the courtyard, the exhibition progresses in rough chronological fashion, featuring work by the next generation of female sculptors. Soft sculpture, textiles, and material experimentation are prevalent, with excellent examples of work by Eva Hesse, Magdalena Abakanowicz, Lynda Benglis, Hannah Wilke, and Yayoi Kusama. Significantly, Latin American artists are well represented here, challenging perceptions of North American hegemony, with works by Venezuelan artist Gego, and the Brazilians Mira Schendel and Anna Maria Maiolino. Almost imperceptible golden threads block off a corner in Lygia Pape’s ethereal “Ttéia 1, A” (1978/1997/1999), a work with which I could easily have spent an hour. The show concludes with the most recent work installed in a raw space that highlights the site’s industrial origins. The lack of interior walls and the frenetic quality of some of the pieces made for an overwhelming viewing experience, as Phyllida Barlow’s brightly-colored timber and foam construction competes with Lara Schnitger’s vaguely S&M-inspired totems and Abigail DeVille’s plywood and debris installation, “Intersection” (2014). This room seems to be the show’s least focused and there are some missed opportunities — Chakaia Booker’s muscular, undulating tire sculptures would have looked great here — but it does a good job of highlighting the way contemporary women artists have built off of and adapted the legacies of their predecessors. An interesting and potentially problematic issue that this new kind of hybrid space raises is the disappearing boundaries between public and private, curatorial and commercial, entrepreneurial and educational in the art world. In his preview piece on Hauser Wirth & Schimmel, the Los Angeles Times‘s Christopher Knight criticized the ethically questionable practice of museums loaning work to gallery shows (and counted some 13 US museums as lenders to the show). Earlier this week, the New York Times published an article about how galleries are contributing money to museum exhibitions of their artists’ work, leading to accusations that critical approval is something to be bought and sold. Revolution in the Making is a meaningful, scholarly, museum-quality show to be sure, so why isn’t it being put on by a museum? “A show like this could not get done in a major museum today in America,” exhibition co-curator Jenni Sorkin, an assistant professor of contemporary art history at the University of California, Santa Barbara, told Hyperallegic. “Many museums have largely stayed away from doing thematic shows, which means risk-taking and presenting an argument. Do they want to put forth an argument as a strategy and put money behind that? It’s a big thing for museums who are having a hard time fundraising right now.” As opposed to museums in Europe, where there is a much stronger tradition of public funding for the arts, US institutions must rely on a wide variety of fundraising strategies, involving public, private, and corporate sources. “There’s a gap in funding in this country, so private entities like Hauser & Wirth have stepped in to fill that void,” Sorkin said. “I can only applaud the fact that they’re doing something so public where they’re inviting people into the space and having public throughways and public spaces, as a way to build community.” Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947–2016 opens at Hauser Wirth & Schimmel (901 East 3rd Street, Downtown, Los Angeles) on Sunday, March 13, 2–6pm, and continues through September 4. Get Hyperallergic in your Inbox! Subscribe to our email newsletter. (Daily or Weekly)
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Tracing Emerging Contemporary Art Practice in Ghana

Tracing Emerging Contemporary Art Practice in Ghana | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it
We are continuing our collaboration with Another Africa with the fifth article from their Tracing Emerging Artistic Practice series dedicated to the artistic scene of Ghana.  Enjoy.     Versione Italiana   From Ghana to Venice and back   All the World’s Futures, curator Okwui Enwezor’s conspicuous project for the2015 Venice Biennale, certainly served up content-rich, social and political commentary. In one way or another it painted or rather – in true Enwezor fashion – documented a myriad of complexities facing our rapidly globalising planet. And, with Enwezor operating as the first-ever curator from the African continent, it’s no surprise then that many of the press discussions surrounding the biennale took on an African dimension.  Consequently, it felt apt to hear the news that Ghanaian artist El Anatsui was presented with a Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement –  a deserving recognition for one of the great artists of our time. Yet, Anatsui’s achievement was also an opportunity for me to once again turn my attention towards the arts and culture scene in Ghana. Throughout the biennale proceedings I was repeatedly reminded of one particular thought from an interview earlier this year with ACCRA[dot]Alt’s Sionne Neely. “We are seeing more artists [in Ghana] now thinking differently about how to push their work forward…creatively collaborating…bartering with one another to get their needs met.   Perhaps the reason why this comment continued to return, was because it is the perfect compliment to the methodology and recognition of Anatsui’s contributions. Upon exiting the Arsenale through Ibrahim Mahama’s ominous serial jute sack installation, I was visibly aware of the past in discussion with the present. Emerging in tune with experience; connected through notions of repetition, seriality, material recycling and a common Ghanaian heritage. But above all, it was their shared collaborative spirit that provided a lens with which to look forward–into the future.  This intermingling between past, present and future, was an episode reminiscent of Walter Benjamin’s reading of Paul Klee’s Angelus Novus. However, it led me to recognise the sense of collaboration present in many conversations within this Next Chapter series; particularly, in the case of Ghana.  From the outside looking in, the collaborative dynamic is seemingly imbued with an even greater sense of urgency. Arguably, it feels as if this spirit is a key driver of what is happening in Ghana right now, as events like ACCRA[dot]ALT’s Chale Wote festival suggest.   The festival, an unapologetically multidisciplinary arts event, brings together everything from music to fashion, art to drama and even BMX riding. Yet, what is most encouraging about it’s success is how it both embodies Ghana’s current vibrancy and speaks to an exciting cross pollination. One that is happening between organizations such as Nubuke foundation, Foundation for Contemporary Art – Ghana, Accra Theatre Workshop, cultural research center ANO, ACCRA[dot]ALT and the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology Museum (K.N.U.S.T.). In our interview, art historian, filmmaker and writer Nana Oforiatta-Ayim of ANO, spoke of the situation. “It feels like it’s not just enough for us to produce, but that we have to provide the context and the paradigms for that production.”  It is this recognition of a shared sense of responsibility that will be pivotal in terms of addressing some of the characteristic bureaucratic shortcomings, stimulating the field of emerging Ghanaian practice and helping to continually position it as an exciting, experimental space. With this in mind, we have profiled three emerging Ghanaian artists who speak to these notions of energy, collaboration and multidisciplinary practice.     Contributions to an ever-developing discourse   Kwame Asante Agyare, Larry Achiampong and Kwasi Ohene-Ayeh each operate very unique and distinct practices, however various facets within their work speak to ideas of collaboration and multidisciplinarity. Whether it be  Asante Agyare and his milk tin sculptures; Achiampong and his work with music archives or Ohene-Ayeh and his negotiation between the role of artist/curator, each practice possesses a dynamic energy. Their conscious decision to explore themes such as prejudice, heritage, labour and shared narratives mark their work with a maturity and urgency that positions them as vital cogs in Ghana’s emerging discourse.   Kwame Asante Agayre's works.   Kwame Asante Agyare Questioning relationships between Reality, Originality and Authenticity   Kwame Asante Agyare utilises recycled milk tin cans to create “curtains and Konko car” installations exploring notions of repetition and seriality. With an interest in the work of philosopher Jean Baudrillard – specifically his Order of Simulcrum – Agyare’s practice questions the relationships between reality, originality and authenticity. It is on this point, that an interesting dynamic develops between Agyare’s theoretical interests, and his use of materials. His decision to utilise a ubiquitous material such as a the milk can, speak to and simultaneously critique an everyday reality faced by many Ghanaians. In an article with Nana Osei Kwadwo, Asante says of the curtains and tin cars,“they are planned through digital simulation models. My process is approached through mechanical engineering strategies. I appropriate the idea of bamboo curtains which can be found in local chop-bars across the country and the idea of tin cars which evokes the bricolage children’s toys that are popular in Ghana.” Here, within this process, a complex dialogue between reality and fabrication exists. There is a blurring of the boundaries as a toy tin car which is made alive through the imagination, is constructed out of a material used to hold a vital form of nutrition. Additionally, this material forms part of as Asante says, “the daily breakfast ritual.. a repetitive and serial process in our society.” Kwame Asante Agayre holds a BFA from K.N.U.S.T. and is currently working towards his MFA at the same institution. He lives and works in both Tema and Kumasi. Notable exhibitions include 2015’s 5th Annual CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival (African Electronic), The Gown must go to Town, Museum of Science and Technology and 2014’s KNUST End of Year Show, Nubuke Foundation, all of which took place in Ghana. Agyare’s work has also featured on ACCRA[dot]ALT, the Imago Mundi Project and Barclays l’Atelier Art Competition, South Africa.     Larry Achiampong's works.   Larry Achiampong Investigating heritage and identity in the post-digital age   Larry Achiampong – an artist of British-Ghanaian descent – utilises performance, installation, collage and sound to as Derica Shields writes, “reinterpret the visual and aural archives that he has inherited.” Meanwhile, Achiampong himself describes his practice as exploring, “representations of identity in the post-digital age and the dichotomies found within a world dominated by facebook/tumblr/youtube-based cultures.” Living and working in London, Achiampong’s practice is arguably most recognized for his Cloudface motif. Exhibited in a performance at the Tate in London, in addition to an earlier collage series titled Glyth, this historically inspired racial motif, speaks directly to Achiampong’s interest in representations of identity. Drawing on Robertson’s Golly, V and his Guy Fawkes mask in V for Vendetta and Laughing Man in The Ghost Series, Cloudface has become a vehicle for initiating discussions on prejudice in its many guises. Furthermore, the process of conceptualising Cloudface reinforces the significance of this inherited archive that Shields alludes to, for Achiampong’s practice. His interest in the archive, stems from a childhood informed by the physical library space – as a place of generating and disseminating knowledge. In the Shield’s interview,  Achiampong says of this experience, “growing up with that aspect of society still very much intact I believe that interest in the archive, the story and the narrative naturally rubbed off on me.” Apart from the Cloudface motif, this interest has also manifested itself in both Meh Mogya and More Mogya, a recording project that traced his Ghanaian heritage via records owned by his parents. In addition, the project also served to question, “how the classic sounds of highlife music might be re-presented today,” in an age dominated by technology. Born in 1984, Larry Achiampong holds an MA in sculpture from the Slade School of Fine Art in London. His work has been highlighted by Hyperallergic, BBC radio, OkayAfrica and ThisisAfrica amongst others. Apart from the Tate performance, other notable exhibitions include, ‘Wir Sind Alle Berliner: ’– ICI/SAVVY Contemporary, Berlin (2015); ‘Diaspora’ – Victoria and Albert Museum, London (2015);  ‘MORE MOGYA’ – BAPMAF, Accra (2013) ; ‘Late at Tate Britain: Afrodizzia’ – Tate Britain, London  (2010) and ‘dOCUMENTA 13’ – Hauptbahnhof, Kassel (2012).        Kwasi Ohene-Ayeh's works.   Kwasi Ohene-Ayeh On identity and the built environment   Kwasi Ohene-Ayeh is a conceptual artist and curator. His practice is multifarious and includes installation, performance and site specific/socially engaged projects. Based in Ghana, Ohene-Ayeh is interested in exploring the, “ambiguities in Accra’s contemporary sign systems and social identity.” He speaks of his works as in constant negotiation for relevance, “in the world of images and ideas.” Working as both an artist and curator, Ohene-Ayeh’s situation presents an intriguing dilemma to his practice. Not only is there a complex overlap between curatorial and artistic uses of space, but there is also a definite negotiation of authority. Talking about the relationship between curators and artist, Ohene-Ayeh defines it as a, “collaboration.” However, he is quick to point out that, “it often evokes a power narrative between artist and curator” and as a result, “ not all collaborations are productive.” That being said, within his own practice this has cultivated a fertile relationship with physical space. Negotiating between these two fields, he has come to examine the built environment in order to assess, “how ephemeral identities are conferred on us when we move through physical space – interior and outdoor environments.” Consequently, as part of the Prison Anxieties series, his project titled Untitled 3…[Letter to the Sky] produced during a residency at Lugar a dudas in Santiago de Cali, Colombia examined, “emotional stories of violence, death, escape, transition and will for freedom through Ghana’s colonial past.” Here, Ohene-Ayeh drew connections between San Antonio, the base of the residency, and Ga mashie in Ghana, through the shared narratives of invasion, trade and violence.   Born in 1986, Kwasi Ohene-Ayeh received a BFA in painting from the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana in 2009 and is currently studying towards an MFA at the same institution. In addition to a residency at Lugar a dudas, Ohene-Ayeh has also participated in residencies at CCA Lagos and attended the Independent Curators International Curatorial Intensive in Marrakech. Curated exhibitions include, Voyage of [Re]Discovery, Ussher Fort Prison and Nubuke Foundation Gallery, Accra, 2015; Silence Between The Lines: Anagrams of Emancipated Futures organized by Ɛyɛ Contemporary Art  and the College of Art, KNUST, Ghana. Noteable personal exhibitions include, “Dear Dakar’ 11th Dak’Art Biennale.   This article is part of the Next Chapter: Inquiries into emerging artistic practice  by Houghton Kinsman. Here is the original article on Another Africa.   Translated by Laura Giacalone.     With the support of
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Artists Seeking Social Change Bring the Public into the Picture | KQED Arts

Social-practice art can look like just about anything: journalism, community organizing, even a shop. The goal is to engage the audience and help people thin...
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Martha Rosler Wins Inaugural “100K Prize” - Artforum

Martha Rosler Wins Inaugural “100K Prize” - Artforum | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it
Martha Rosler will be the first recipient of the 100K Prize, given by the New Foundation in Seattle. The $100,000 unrestricted cash award will be given every
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“DON’T JUST OCCUPY THE FUTURE, DECOLONIZE THE PRESENT” An Open Letter from THE QOLEKTIV to Creative Time

“DON’T JUST OCCUPY THE FUTURE, DECOLONIZE THE PRESENT” An Open Letter from THE QOLEKTIV to Creative Time | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it
Contemptorary fully endorses this letter, written by THE QOLEKTIV in response to Creative Time’s invitation of the founder of the Islamophobic group FEMEN, Anna Hutsol, who spoke at the CT Su…
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Wanda Nanibush named AGO's first curator of indigenous art | Toronto Star

Wanda Nanibush named AGO's first curator of indigenous art | Toronto Star | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it
Nanibush, who is Anishinabe from the Beausoleil First Nation near Penetanguishene, begins her position this month.
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Spectacular Geography and Studios in the Kitchen: Michelle Grabner on Curating the Portland Biennial

Spectacular Geography and Studios in the Kitchen: Michelle Grabner on Curating the Portland Biennial | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it
This year’s iteration of the Portland Biennial, organized by the Disjecta Contemporary Art Center and curated by artist Michelle Grabner, claims to be the most complete survey of contemporary art in Oregon ever, with 34 artists exhibiting across 25 venues
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Philipp Kaiser: From Bern to LA to Venice

Philipp Kaiser: From Bern to LA to Venice | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it
The appointment of Philipp Kaiser as curator of the Swiss pavilion for the 2017 Venice Art Biennale is seen as a move to reenergise Switzerland’s century-old participation in the event. The Swiss-born, Los Angeles-based 44-year-old is one of the most sought-after curators today. Tall, with an easy elegance and an engaging smile, Kaiser exudes a juvenile enthusiasm that belies his standing as a major figure in the world of contemporary art. One day in Los Angeles, the following in Switzerland and the week after in New York, catching up with him is like chasing the wind. But when our interview finally takes place across several time zones, he gives it his undivided attention. Venice Art Biennale - Founded in 1895, the Venice Art Biennale continues to be most prestigious showcase for artists from around the globe. It takes place from June to November biannually and is curated by a different artistic director each time. The central exhibition is surrounded by ...
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‘800 years of oppression!’ Ireland’s contemporary art biennial

‘800 years of oppression!’ Ireland’s contemporary art biennial | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it
The latest edition of EVA International tackles issues of postcolonialism at home and abroad
The post ‘800 years of oppression!’ Ireland’s contemporary art biennial appeared first on Apollo Magazine.
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A Los Angeles Mega-Gallery Opens with Museum Ambitions

A Los Angeles Mega-Gallery Opens with Museum Ambitions | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it
LOS ANGELES — Hauser Wirth & Schimmel, the local outpost of mega-gallery Hauser & Wirth, will open its massive hybrid art space to the public on Sunday. Located on the site of a 100-year-old flour mill in LA’s downtown Arts District, the complex will include exhibition spaces, a restaurant, bookstore, central courtyard, a book and printed matter lab, even a public park. This all-encompassing approach aims to provide what curator and gallery partner Paul Schimmel described during yesterday’s press preview as “something that I think LA has long wished for and needed, a kind of seamless urban experience that doesn’t separate life from art.” Encompassing seven buildings and stretching between 3rd and 2nd streets, the complex sprawls across 116,000 square feet, just 4,000 fewer than the Broad Museum a couple of miles to the west. The renovation by Creative Space, LA and Annabelle Selldorf makes for a dynamic experience, as visitors progress from white cube to sun-drenched atrium and into rough-hewn warehouse galleries, while smaller, more intimate rooms allow you to catch your breathe. The debut exhibition, Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947–2016, is a knockout revisionist survey featuring almost 100 works by 34 artists created over the past 70 years. Challenging the popular art historical premise that male painters were creating the most important work of the mid 20th century, the show aims to refocus attention on both sculpture and female artists. The exhibition begins in a pristine, light-filled gallery where works by pioneering artists like Louise Bourgeois and Louise Nevelson can be seen next to those by less well-known contemporaries like Ruth Asawa, whose organic wire hangings are one of the room’s highlights. Another is a series of six grim and grimy constructions by Lee Bontecou, an artist who is often cited but rarely seen, and whose steel and canvas works must be experienced in person. Leaving this space, you cross the central courtyard, where Jackie Windsor’s “30 to 1 Bound Trees” towers over you. This work, a recreation of a piece originally produced in Nova Scotia in the early 1970s, draws on movements of the era like Land Art and Minimalism, while at the same time recalling an ancient and earth-centered mysticism. In the building on the far side of the courtyard, the exhibition progresses in rough chronological fashion, featuring work by the next generation of female sculptors. Soft sculpture, textiles, and material experimentation are prevalent, with excellent examples of work by Eva Hesse, Magdalena Abakanowicz, Lynda Benglis, Hannah Wilke, and Yayoi Kusama. Significantly, Latin American artists are well represented here, challenging perceptions of North American hegemony, with works by Venezuelan artist Gego, and the Brazilians Mira Schendel and Anna Maria Maiolino. Almost imperceptible golden threads block off a corner in Lygia Pape’s ethereal “Ttéia 1, A” (1978/1997/1999), a work with which I could easily have spent an hour. The show concludes with the most recent work installed in a raw space that highlights the site’s industrial origins. The lack of interior walls and the frenetic quality of some of the pieces made for an overwhelming viewing experience, as Phyllida Barlow’s brightly-colored timber and foam construction competes with Lara Schnitger’s vaguely S&M-inspired totems and Abigail DeVille’s plywood and debris installation, “Intersection” (2014). This room seems to be the show’s least focused and there are some missed opportunities — Chakaia Booker’s muscular, undulating tire sculptures would have looked great here — but it does a good job of highlighting the way contemporary women artists have built off of and adapted the legacies of their predecessors. An interesting and potentially problematic issue that this new kind of hybrid space raises is the disappearing boundaries between public and private, curatorial and commercial, entrepreneurial and educational in the art world. In his preview piece on Hauser Wirth & Schimmel, the Los Angeles Times‘s Christopher Knight criticized the ethically questionable practice of museums loaning work to gallery shows (and counted some 13 US museums as lenders to the show). Earlier this week, the New York Times published an article about how galleries are contributing money to museum exhibitions of their artists’ work, leading to accusations that critical approval is something to be bought and sold. Revolution in the Making is a meaningful, scholarly, museum-quality show to be sure, so why isn’t it being put on by a museum? “A show like this could not get done in a major museum today in America,” exhibition co-curator Jenni Sorkin, an assistant professor of contemporary art history at the University of California, Santa Barbara, told Hyperallegic. “Many museums have largely stayed away from doing thematic shows, which means risk-taking and presenting an argument. Do they want to put forth an argument as a strategy and put money behind that? It’s a big thing for museums who are having a hard time fundraising right now.” As opposed to museums in Europe, where there is a much stronger tradition of public funding for the arts, US institutions must rely on a wide variety of fundraising strategies, involving public, private, and corporate sources. “There’s a gap in funding in this country, so private entities like Hauser & Wirth have stepped in to fill that void,” Sorkin said. “I can only applaud the fact that they’re doing something so public where they’re inviting people into the space and having public throughways and public spaces, as a way to build community.” Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947–2016 opens at Hauser Wirth & Schimmel (901 East 3rd Street, Downtown, Los Angeles) on Sunday, March 13, 2–6pm, and continues through September 4. Get Hyperallergic in your Inbox! Subscribe to our email newsletter. (Daily or Weekly)See it on Scoop.it, via Issues in Curatorial Practice
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Celebrated Bangladeshi artists premiere works confronting social and political issues in new exhibition

Celebrated Bangladeshi artists premiere works confronting social and political issues in new exhibition | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it
The First Art Newspaper on the Net   Established in 1996 France Saturday, March 5, 2016 Celebrated Bangladeshi artists premiere works confronting social and political issues in new exhibition Tayeba Begum Lipi, My Daughter's Cot, 2012. Collection of Steven Gold, Florida, USA. Photo: Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University. EAST LANSING, MICH.- The Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University (Broad MSU) will present, for the first time, a joint exhibition of contemporary Bangladeshi artists Tayeba Begum Lipi and Mahbubur Rahman. The exhibition will explore the artists’ commentary on and challenge of social values, expectations, and conventions that are a part of everyday life—raising questions about national and global issues including gender-specific violence and sociopolitical conflict. The exhibition will mark the first time Lipi and Rahman’s works are put in dialogue with one another—revealing an interchange of ideas, overlapping themes, as well as connections between materials used. On view March 5 – August 7, 2016, The Artist as Activist will include nearly 40 works across media, as well as never-before-seen pieces by both artists. “Many of the societal norms Lipi and Rahman challenge within the context of their native Bangladeshi culture have deep resonances around the world—from issues of personal identity to gender equality to migration,” said Caitlín Doherty, curator of the exhibition and Deputy Director of Curatorial Affairs at the Broad MSU. “I have personally been fascinated by their work, drawn to the ways in which both artists’ activist instincts are realized throughout their practice. Sparking dialogues across cultural and geographic boundaries is central to our mission, and we are so proud to welcome them to the Broad MSU for their first joint museum exhibition.” The Artist as Activist: Tayeba Begum Lipi and Mahbubur Rahman joins other exhibitions at the Broad MSU examining work by living artists from the U.S. and around the globe who are addressing a range of social and political issues through their practice—including recent exhibitions of South Asian artists Naiza Khan, Imran Qureshi, and Mithu Sen. Installed across three galleries within the Broad MSU and occupying an entire floor of the Museum, The Artist as Activist will begin with an introduction to each artist individually, emphasizing the distinct themes of their unique practices. At the close of the exhibition, works by Lipi and Rahman that were created in concert with one another will be presented side-by-side. With over 35 works included, the exhibition marks the largest presentation in a U.S. museum for both artists. Highlights include: · Lipi’s My Daughter’s Cot (2012), part of an installation of works in the exhibition that overhaul ideas of domesticity by fabricating everyday furniture and clothing objects out of razor blades, including a bath tub, dressing table, sewing machine, and shoes. · A new work by Lipi, Womanhood-2 (2015), also created from razor blades and depicting a series of vests in a commentary on aspects of motherhood. · Two video works by Lipi that explore female identity, including her first video work Little Learner (2008) and I Wed Myself (2010), which challenge the expectations of arranged marriage and religious routine for women in Bangladesh. · New and past works by Rahman in his series of photographs and sculptures, Transformation (2004-present). The series references a poem by Syed Shamsul Haq and uses the symbol of a bull as a metaphor for societal and economic oppression. · Rahman’s photographic work Feature – 2 (2013) and sculpture Sounds from Nowhere 8 (2015), both of which comment on the human cost of corporate greed. The works, depicting stainless-steel scissors, reference the rudimentary tools used to free survivors of the 2013 Rana Plaza disaster, in which over 1,000 factory workers perished when the clothing factory collapsed. · Rahman’s charcoal drawing Landing (2010), which challenges notions of national borders, forced migration, and denial of freedom of movement. · An installation of works by both Lipi and Rahman addressing the isolation of and building awareness for the transgender community within Bangladesh. Challenging traditional perceptions of artistic professions in Bangladesh, Rahman has pioneered a cross-media approach, working primarily as a performance artist and painter exploring sociopolitical conflicts shaping the history of Bangladesh and South Asia. Lipi’s artistic practice spans painting, printmaking, installation, and video art, and her work often focuses on themes of female identity and gender-specific violence in Bangladesh and around the globe. Lipi has also collaborated with artists throughout her career, most notably serving as commissioner of Parables for the Bangladesh Pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 2011. The artists, who are also married, co-founded the Britto Arts Trust in 2002. Bangladesh’s first artist-run alternative arts platform, the Trust is dedicated to organizing exhibitions, enabling international dialogue and exchange, and providing support to the country’s artists through residencies, workshops, and funding. The Artist as Activist: Tayeba Begum Lipi and Mahbubur Rahman is curated by Caitlín Doherty with support from Amit Kumar Jain, Curatorial Consultant for the exhibition, and organized by the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University. Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography, Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs, Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .   Founder: Ignacio Villarreal Editor & Publisher:Jose Villarreal - Consultant: Ignacio Villarreal Jr. Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez Royalville Communications, Inc produces: ignaciovillarreal.org theavemariasound.org juncodelavega.org facundocabral-elfinal.org Founder's Site. The most varied versions of this beautiful prayer. Hommage to a Mexican poet. Hommage
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Istanbul Gallery Cancels War-Themed Exhibition, Citing “the Delicate Situation in Turkey”

Istanbul Gallery Cancels War-Themed Exhibition, Citing “the Delicate Situation in Turkey” | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it
Post-Peace, an exhibition that was slated to open on March 2 at the nonprofit cultural center Akbank Sanat in Istanbul, has been cancelled due to what organizers are describing as ongoing political tensions within Turkey. The cancellation of the exhibition, curated by the fourth recipient of Akbank Sanat’s Annual International Curator Competition, the Russian curator Katia Krupennikova, comes at a particularly sensitive time in the country. On February 17, a car bomb exploded outside a military housing complex in central Ankara, killing 29 and injuring 61. It was the country’s fifth major terrorist attack in less than a year. Asked to comment on the cancellation, Derya Bigalı, directing manager of Akbank Sanat, told Hyperallergic: “in accordance with its consistently leading role in Turkish contemporary art over the years, Akbank Sanat would like to announce to the public that the exhibition has been cancelled following various considerations.” Pressed to elaborate on the nature of these “considerations,” she said: We have been organizing International Curator Competition for 4 years. We have supported and hosted many curators and artists during these exhibitions. As you all know, the last competition was held 5 months ago. In the intervening months, we worked very hard on the project and gave it our full support in anticipation of a wonderful exhibition. However, over the course of our preparations, Turkey went through a very troubled time. In particular, the tragic incidents in Ankara are very fresh in people’s memories. Turkey is still reeling from their emotional aftershocks and remains in a period of mourning. In accordance with Akbank Sanat’s sense of responsibility in the Turkish contemporary art world and following various considerations regarding the delicate situation in Turkey, the exhibition has been cancelled. Krupennikova, however, sees the decision as an act of censorship. “I, along with the artists in the show, believe this to be a case of political censorship,” she said in a statement sent to Hyperallergic (see below for the full statement). “I fully recognize the tense political atmosphere in Turkey right now, and the reasons why Akbank Sanat may not wish to be associated with the exhibition. But this is also why it is essential to have open discussions and a place for people to engage with different perspectives on issues relevant in the Turkish context and beyond.” Though the precise reason for the cancelation of the exhibition at Akbank Sanat remains unknown, several sources inside Turkey’s cultural scene who wished to remain anonymous for fear of retaliation suggested it may be due to a heightened sense of conservatism under President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan. Krupennikova’s exhibition was set to explore the “contemporary condition of war in its concrete and abstract states.” The artists invited to participate in the show included Anonymous Stateless Immigrants, Ella de Búrca, Anna Dasović, Yazan Khalili, Adrian Melis, Dorian de Rijk, belit sağ, Alexei Taruts, Anika Schwarzlose, and Anastasia Yarovenko; the writers Oxana Timofeeva, Ece Temelkuran, and Etel Adnan; and public programming participants Yaşar Adanali, Pınar Öğrenci, Koken Ergun, and Jaha Koo. The incident comes soon after a similar controversy at SALT Beyoğlu, one of Istanbul’s most important cultural destinations, which closed in December of last year. Founded in 2011, SALT conducts interdisciplinary research projects, public programs, exhibitions, performances, and workshops. Vasif Kortun, SALT’s director of research and programs, said that the closure of its Beyoğlu space was due to “technical reasons” after the institution failed to gain approval from the Istanbul building authority for ongoing renovations. However, many speculate that the cancellation of the permit on the basis of a technicality was merely an excuse to mask the government’s ongoing policy of suppressing dissent. Akbank Sanat was established in 1993 under a mandate to provide a “place where change never ends.” In coordination with art critic and writer Basak Senova, Akbank Sanat’s International Curator Competition was established in 2011 as a juried award “intended to provide support for emerging curators, reinforce interest in curatorial practices, and encourage new projects in the field of contemporary art.” Located on İstiklal Avenue in the heart of Istanbul, not far from Taksim Square, Akbank Sanat is a stone’s throw from where protests began in Gezi Park on May 28, 2013. The demonstrations ushered in a wave of discontent initially over plans to develop the square, swelling to encompass a wide range of issues including freedom of the press, expression, and assembly, as well as what protestors claimed was the government’s encroachment on Turkey’s secularism. Whether as a result of official censorship or self-censorship on the part of the gallery, the cancellation of Post-Peace belies an ever more repressive climate in Turkey. Katia Krupennikova’s original statement regarding the exhibition’s cancelation reads in full: In October 2015 I won the Akbank Sanat Curator Competition with an exhibition project which brings together artists from a variety of origins to question how war and peace appear today. The title of the show is “Post-Peace,” a term that is a possible name for our difficult and confusing present. It was planned to open on 1 March 2016 and run until 7 May, 2016 in Akbank Sanat, Istanbul. The project was selected by an international jury consisting of Bassam El Baroni (independent curator and theory tutor at Dutch Art Institute, Arnhem), Paul O’Neill (curator, writer and Director of the Graduate Program at the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, New York), Iris Dressler and Hans D. Christ (directors of the Württembergisch Kunstverein Stuttgart). Developed and coordinated by Basak Senova, the competition is intended to provide support for emerging curators, reinforce interest in curatorial practices, and encourage new projects in the field of contemporary art. On the 25th February, 2016, a few days before the opening, the exhibition was cancelled by Akbank Sanat. The official explanation letter to myself and the jury states the following reasons: “…over the course of our preparations, Turkey went through a very troubled time. In particular, the tragic incidents in Ankara are very fresh in people’s memories. Turkey is still reeling from their emotional aftershocks and remains in a period of mourning. Therefore, many events, including – but not limited to – exhibitions, concerts, and performances, are being cancelled every day.” I, along with the artists in the show, believe this to be a case of political censorship. I fully recognize the tense political atmosphere in Turkey right now, and the reasons why Akbank Sanat may not wish to be associated with the exhibition. But this is also why it is essential to have open discussions and a place for people to engage with different perspectives on issues relevant in the Turkish context and beyond. This situation is a very complicated one, and that is why I am currently in discussion with several institutions in Istanbul to host conversations about the ethics and responsibilities of art professionals working in tense political and social environments. I am also proposing to these institutions to co-host events and parts of the exhibition. I believe that turning this unfortunate situation into a critical dialogue is the best and most constructive decision. In a subsequent statement sent to Hyperallergic, she added: This situation is a very complicated one, and that is why I am currently in discussion with several institutions in Istanbul to host conversations about the ethics and responsibilities of art professionals working in tense political and social environments. I am also proposing to these institutions to co-host events and parts of the exhibition. I believe that turning this unfortunate situation into a critical dialogue is the best and most constructive decision. Get Hyperallergic in your Inbox! Subscribe to our email newsletter. (Daily or Weekly)
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7 art shows by 7 emerging curators

In the past two years all of our lives have changed drastically. Some have travelled from other countries, moved from other parts of the US or even switched careers, all in order to pursue our love of art and curating. The day we met for the first time, we were all shy and somewhat scared, but we shared equal footing in that we would be the first class to graduate from the School of Visual Art’s new Masters in Curatorial Practice. That first week we all ate dinner together, and that meal marked the beginning of our journey as classmates and life long friends. Many meals and conversations have followed with us sharing how we want to make a difference politically, socially, and artistically through the exhibitions we organize and the artists we support. Our approaches and interests are different, ranging from music to fashion, or architecture to technology, but one thing remains unchanging. As a group we are committed to sharing art with our surrounding communities, in hopes that they will come to love it as much as we do. We are an international group of curators with a wide range of interests and varied practices. We are confident in our abilities, in each other, and are prepared to leave the classroom behind, but this is where we need your support: We believe in the idea that through curating art we contribute to building communities and we invite you to join ours! Help us turn 7 projects into a reality throughout New York City, in print, and online! Below you can learn more about each of us and our proposals: Lal Bahcecioglu Sneak a Peek I’m curating a semi-open-air exhibition! It will feature video works displayed on TV screens behind the windows of first-floor residences in NYC, placed indoors facing the street. The participating residents are the exhibitors, and the passers-by are the viewers. Lal is a curator with an architecture background. She is originally from Istanbul and got her bachelor's degree in Architecture from Vienna University of Technology. Currently, she is attending to the School of Visual Arts’ MA in Curatorial Practice. For more intormation about her curated exhibitions and writings please visit www.lalbahcecioglu.com Kayla Fanelli For my thesis exhibition I’ll be exploring the fluidity of identity and language in the internet age. This project will be realized both online and offline and will also serve as an exploration of the phenomenological challenges of presenting this type of work. Kayla is a New York based curator. She received a dual undergraduate degree from The Ohio State University in International Business and Spanish Literature and Culture. While completing her graduate studies, Kayla has gained valuable experience working with the New Museum, The Kitchen, Swiss Institute, and Charles Atlas. She is passionate about the intersection of art and technology. Recent projects include Remember Me Offline and (RE)VISION. Mohammad Golabi With artworks focusing on the traumatic effects of war, socio-political injustice, mass immigration, and xenophobia, I’m presenting an exhibition that reflects both hope and despair. We would like to confront the public with these insane realities and envision a new future by transforming these experiences into new formats of knowledge. Mohammad Golabi is an Iranian architect and curator based in New York City. For six years, Mohammad has worked as an architect in Iran, South Africa and Iraq. His bi-cultural background and focus on community collaboration inform his practice. Mohammad received his Bachelor in Architecture at Sooreh University in Tehran and his Master of Architecture at Cape Peninsula University in Cape Town, South Africa. Allison Peller Ornamentation of the Joint This exhibition looks at photographers who are exploring the boundaries of what a photograph is or can be by incorporating different materials and methods to create their art work. Each piece highlights, or ornaments the joining of photography with other ideas and practices, such as sculpture, collage, and performance. Allison Peller is a Midwestern transplant now based in New York. She has a wide variety of experience working with art institutions, including the Pace Gallery, Walker Art Center, Swiss Institute, and Essl Museum. She has curated exhibitions in Minnesota and New York and is particularly interested in artists working across mediums and disciplines. Lalita Salander Rachel Garrard: Repeating Traces Rachel Garrard will perform a public sharing of an articulation of knowledge gained through a period of research and a residency term. This performance will be one iteration of a project that aims to highlight similarities between studies of matter, consciousness research, and the beliefs of tribal cultures. The connecting thread is that energy is never lost, but simply transferred from one form to another. rachelgarrard.com Lalita Salander is a New York based curator. She has previously worked with a selection of public collections and galleries in the U.S. and Europe. Salander's own artwork has been featured in group and solo exhibitions. Donation by the artist Rachel Garrard: 3 drawings for only $400 each! Check the rewards section! --> Ana Sophie Salazar PATAFEST is a new festival that will launch with an experimental and absurd cabaret evening celebrating 100 years of Dada. PATAFEST explores collectivity through a political variety show that includes music, cabaret, poetry, performance, drag, and video, unifying artistic voices into a loud and dissonant chorus. Ana Sophie is an Ecuadorian and Portuguese curator currently living in Brooklyn. She graduated in piano from the Music School of Lisbon. In 2013, she co-founded the art and architecture project Pátio Ambulante, which experiments with artistic practices and participatory research in public open space in the city of Lisbon. Ana is focused on social activism and political philosophy. Marie Vigneau My thesis project will be a study in new ways of curating the distinctions and interconnections between art and fashion, and between artists and the fashion industry. The result will be a mock fashion magazine, featuring the wearable work of visual artists, as a sort of exhibition as catalogue. After graduating from SUNY Oneonta with a dual-degree in Art History and French, Marie began her first curatorial projects, collaborating with a New York-based artist collective that had a strong social practice, she helped develop many intergenerational arts education projects. Her scholarship has focused on fashion/costume design, feminism and new technologies in art. She has experience with several art institutions including the Swiss Institute, Michael Mut Gallery, Grey Art Gallery, and Brooklyn Museum. THANK YOU One of the most important things we have learned during our program is the power of building a supportive community. We do hope you will become part of ours! All donations will go directly into the production of the projects and the support of the participating artists. Any contribution independent of its amount will make a huge difference and we can’t appreciate it enough! Thank you for your support! :) ABOUT CURATING Curating is a growing field in the arts, although not a new one. The word comes from “curare,” which means taking care. Traditionally, the curators in a museum are the professionals responsible for the works of art and their display. Today, curating has expanded to encompass a complex set of skills and tasks. Curators can work independently or linked to different kinds of institutions and work directly with artists to create shows, publications, or other projects. They are responsible for contextualizing the work and presenting it to the public. Music credits: Spank by Les Negresses Vertes Thank you Upicnic for supporting our projects!
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Minoo Emami's "War Collection" covered in the Harvard Gazette

Minoo Emami's exhibit "War Collection" is on display through August 19, 2015 at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Room 102 (sculpture) and CGIS Knafel, Fisher Family Commons (paintings).
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Leadership Talks | Art & Education

Leadership Talks | Art & Education | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it
Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance (ICPP) at Wesleyan University launches Leadership Talks from... https://t.co/hAFzXFaoFd
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LACMA's Michael Govan, in NY for Coveted Leo Award, Talks Future of Curatorial Field

LACMA's Michael Govan, in NY for Coveted Leo Award, Talks Future of Curatorial Field | Issues in Curatorial Practice | Scoop.it
Independent Curators International will celebrate its 40th anniversary by honoring LACMA director Michael Govan.
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