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Rescooped by Mrs. Michelle Fink from The 21st Century
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TED Talk Asks: How Can We Build A School In The Cloud? - Edudemic

TED Talk Asks: How Can We Build A School In The Cloud? - Edudemic | Issues and Topics in Education | Scoop.it
What if we could all send our children to a school in the cloud as Sugata Mitra suggests in a new TED Talk? Would you go? What would it look like?

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Ken Morrison's comment, July 12, 2013 8:08 PM
I really like his "SOLE" concept. My students do as well. I use his "Whole in the Wall" concept to challenge my students to not wait for teachers when they want to learn something new.
Ricardo Martín Ramirez 's comment, July 12, 2013 8:10 PM
This man is a genius!
Rescooped by Mrs. Michelle Fink from Into the Driver's Seat
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A Four-Phase Process For Implementing Essential Questions | TeachThought

A Four-Phase Process For Implementing Essential Questions | TeachThought | Issues and Topics in Education | Scoop.it

By Grant Wiggins

 

"We had a delightful visit to The School of the Future in New York City the other day. Lots of engaged kids, a great blend of instruction and constructivist work, and an obvious intellectual culture. And as the picture illustrates, everywhere we went we also saw helpful visual reminders of the big ideas and essential questions framing the work we were watching:

 

"School of the Future staff have long been users of UbD tools and ideas.

But far too often over the years I have seen plenty of good stuff posted like this – but no deep embedding of the Essential Question (EQ) into the unit design and lessons that make it up.  Merely posting the EQs and occasionally reminding kids of it is pointless: the aim is to use the question to frame specific activities, to provide perspective and focus, to prioritize the course, and to signal to students that, eventually, THEY must – on their own – pose this and other key questions. (Note: I am not criticizing what we saw and heard at SoF, rather using this teachable moment to raise an issue that needs addressing by almost all faculty using our work.)

 

"Let’s start with a simple example from my own teaching. The EQ for the unit: Who sees and who is blind? The readings: The Emperor’s New Clothes, Plato’s Allegory of the Cave, Oedipus the King. Students are instructed to take notes around the EQ and other questions that arise related to it (e.g. Why do people deceive themselves?). We alternate between small-group discussions of the previous night’s reading, Socratic Seminar on the readings with the whole class, some mini-lessons on reading and note-taking skills, and a teacher-led de-briefing of what worked, what didn’t in Seminar as well as a discussion of confusing points in the texts. The final assessment? An essay on the EQ.

 

"At every turn, in other words, the EQ looms large in the unit. Students are not only encouraged to keep pondering it across each reading, but they take notes on the question and routinely remind one another that this question is the focus.

 

"This is far different than what we typically see in walk-throughs where EQs are being used. The only person that keeps referring to the EQ is the teacher; the main use of the question is by teachers in which they point out “answers” to the EQ. Rarely is the EQ central to the assessment – in part, because all too often the EQ is too convergent and has a right answer that the teacher wants learned. Almost never does there appear to be a plan whereby the question goes from the teacher’s control to the students’ control."


Via Jim Lerman
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Rescooped by Mrs. Michelle Fink from Engagement Based Teaching and Learning
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Teacher Planning Doesn’t Have To Stifle Creativity In Schools

Teacher Planning Doesn’t Have To Stifle Creativity In Schools | Issues and Topics in Education | Scoop.it
by Grant Wiggins, Ph. D, Authenticeducation A recent query via Twitter asked a question we often hear: isn’t UbD (or any planning process) antithetical to such approaches as project-based learning and inquiry-based learning, since you...

Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, February 2, 2013 5:05 PM

Knowing your purpose is how you design learning.  The designing is creative; good planning results in creativity.  

Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, August 6, 2015 7:52 AM

Knowing your purpose is how you design learning.  The designing is creative; good planning results in creativity.  

Rescooped by Mrs. Michelle Fink from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
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UbD and serendipity: why planning helps rather than hinders creativity

UbD and serendipity: why planning helps rather than hinders creativity | Issues and Topics in Education | Scoop.it
A recent query via Twitter asked a question we often hear: isn’t UbD (or any planning process) antithetical to such approaches as project-based learning and inquiry-based learning, since you can’t ...

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
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Rescooped by Mrs. Michelle Fink from Implementing Common Core Standards in Special Education
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Response to Intervention | RTI | RTI Resources | Intervention Central

Response to Intervention | RTI | RTI Resources | Intervention Central | Issues and Topics in Education | Scoop.it
Intervention Central is the leading resource for Response to Intervention (RTI) tools and resources, including academic and behavior interventions for classroom management.

Via Beth Panitz, Ed.D.
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