ISO Mental Health & Wellness
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ISO Mental Health & Wellness
About living with (or recovering from) Mental Disorders and Co-Dependency
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Expert: Talking to Children About the Connecticut School Shooting

Expert: Talking to Children About the Connecticut School Shooting | ISO Mental Health & Wellness | Scoop.it
Most children -- even those exposed to trauma -- are quite resilient.
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Society for Neuroscience - Studies Report Early Childhood Trauma Takes Visible Toll On Brain; Changes Found In Regions Controlling Heart and Behavior

Society for Neuroscience - Studies Report Early Childhood Trauma Takes Visible Toll On Brain; Changes Found In Regions Controlling Heart and Behavior | ISO Mental Health & Wellness | Scoop.it

Trauma in infancy and childhood shapes the brain, learning, and behavior, and fuels changes that can last a lifetime, according to new human and animal research released October 16. 

 

The findings show:

• Physical abuse in early childhood may realign communication between key “body-control” brain areas, possibly predisposing adults to cardiovascular disease and mental health problems 

• Rodent studies provide insight into brain changes that allow tolerance of pain within mother-pup attachment.


• Childhood poverty is associated with changes in working memory and attention years later in adults; yet training in childhood is associated with improved cognitive functions.


• Chronic stress experienced by infant primates leads to fearful and aggressive behaviors; these are associated with changes in stress hormone production and in the development of the amygdala.

 

Another recent finding discussed shows that:


• Parent education and income is associated with children’s brain size, including structures important for memory and emotion.

 

(The Society for Neuroscience is a nonprofit membership organization of basic scientists and physicians who study the brain and nervous system.)


Via Gina Stepp
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Sanctuary for the Abused: What PTSD Sufferers Need Others to Know

Sanctuary for the Abused: What PTSD Sufferers Need Others to Know | ISO Mental Health & Wellness | Scoop.it

1 – Knowledge is power. Understanding the process of a triggering event, the psychic reaction to trauma, the warning signs and symptoms of PTSD, and available treatment options for PTSD allows you to help recognize, support and guide your PTSD loved one toward diagnosis, treatment and healing. We need you to be clearheaded, pulled together and informed.

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Embattled Childhoods May Be the Real Trauma for Soldiers With PTSD - Association for Psychological Science

Embattled Childhoods May Be the Real Trauma for Soldiers With PTSD - Association for Psychological Science | ISO Mental Health & Wellness | Scoop.it

New research on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in soldiers challenges popular assumptions about the origins and trajectory of PTSD, providing evidence that traumatic experiences in childhood – not combat – may predict which soldiers develop the disorder.


Psychological scientist Dorthe Berntsen of Aarhus University in Denmark and a team of Danish and American researchers wanted to understand why some soldiers develop PTSD but others don’t. They also wanted to develop a clearer understanding of how the symptoms of the disorder progress.


“Most studies on PTSD in soldiers following service in war zones do not include measures of PTSD symptoms prior to deployment and thus suffer from a baseline problem. Only a few studies have examined pre- to post-deployment changes in PTSD symptoms, and most only use a single before-and-after measure,” says Berntsen.

 

The findings challenge the notion that exposure to combat and other war atrocities is the main cause of PTSD.


“We were surprised that stressful experiences during childhood seemed to play such a central role in discriminating the resilient versus non-resilient groups,” says Berntsen. “These results should make psychologists question prevailing assumptions about PTSD and its development.”

 

[Note from Mom Psych: The really surprising thing is that the researchers were surprised. Other researchers have long known that secure attachment in childhood supports resilience (against the effects of stress as well as trauma), and that differences in resilience help explain why some people succumb to mental health issues later in life and others don't.]  See also: http://www.mom-psych.com/Articles/Trauma-and-Resilience/What-Is-Resilience-GS1001.html ;


Via Gina Stepp
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Naomi Majid's curator insight, June 2, 2015 7:01 PM

#PTSD very interesting - psychological resilience linked to level of security in childhood 

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Borderline Personality Disorder and the "I Let It Happen" Myth | More Than Borderline

Borderline Personality Disorder and the "I Let It Happen" Myth | More Than Borderline | ISO Mental Health & Wellness | Scoop.it
It's a myth as old as trauma--I let it happen.

 

During a traumatic event, we have one of three reactions: fight, flight, or freeze. Fighting back can often leave us injured worse than if we had cooperated. Flight can feel like cowardice, and can backfire if we’re not fast enough. Freezing, the least understood of the reactions, especially contributes to the “I let it happen” myth.

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