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ISO Mental Health & Wellness
About living with (or recovering from) Mental Disorders and Co-Dependency
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What Picking Up Other People's Garbage Unexpectedly Taught Me About Compassion - Karen C.L. Anderson

What Picking Up Other People's Garbage Unexpectedly Taught Me About Compassion - Karen C.L. Anderson | ISO Mental Health & Wellness | Scoop.it
“Many of us think that compassion drains us, but I promise you it is something that truly enlivens us.” ~ Joan Halifax I was taking one of my nearly daily OBP 365 walks and I came across a McDonald’s bag, either tossed by someone from a moving car or perhaps left there by someone who …
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The Biology of Kindness: How It Makes Us Happier and Healthier | TIME.com

The Biology of Kindness: How It Makes Us Happier and Healthier | TIME.com | ISO Mental Health & Wellness | Scoop.it

There’s a reason why being kind to others is good for you — and it can now be traced to a specific nerve.

 

When it comes to staying healthy, both physically and mentally, studies consistently show that strong relationships are at least as important as avoiding smoking and obesity. But how does social support translate into physical benefits such as lower blood pressure, healthier weights and other physiological measures of sound health? A new study published in Psychological Science suggests that the link may follow the twisting path of the vagus nerve, which connects social contact to the positive emotions that can flow from interactions.

 

By Maia Szalavitz


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Marilyne Kubath's curator insight, May 24, 2013 7:59 AM

I think this is true if you do something nice and decent you do feel a bit better about, but if do something a bit mean you feel a lot worse.

Abigail McNeely's comment, June 3, 2013 2:21 PM
I find it so interesting that we in the West need physical evidence to really start believing in something. Not that it's wrong to want evidence, after all that's what critical thinking is about. Thank goodness technology is now helping us catch up with folk wisdom.
Marilyne Kubath's comment, June 3, 2013 2:32 PM
I agree all governments need to relearn this.
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What’s better: Self-esteem or self-compassion?

What’s better: Self-esteem or self-compassion? | ISO Mental Health & Wellness | Scoop.it

Self-esteem has long been touted as a key ingredient for success. But psychologist Heidi Grant Halvorson says on her The Science of Success blog that recent research suggests high self-esteem does not predict better performance or greater success, even if people with high self esteem may believe they’re more successful. But research also suggest a substitute that may be the key to unlocking your potential for greatness: self-compassion.

 

Harvey Schachter


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Brain can be trained in compassion, study shows

Brain can be trained in compassion, study shows | ISO Mental Health & Wellness | Scoop.it

A new study by researchers at the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds at the Waisman Center of the University of Wisconsin-Madison shows that adults can be trained to be more compassionate. The report, published Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, investigates whether training adults in compassion can result in greater altruistic behavior and related changes in neural systems underlying compassion.

 

"Our fundamental question was, 'Can compassion be trained and learned in adults? Can we become more caring if we practice that mindset?'" says Helen Weng, lead author of the study and a graduate student in clinical psychology. "Our evidence points to yes."


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Marilyne Kubath's curator insight, May 29, 2013 5:46 AM

This is excellent.

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Meditation Makes Us Act with Compassion

Meditation Makes Us Act with Compassion | ISO Mental Health & Wellness | Scoop.it

A new study suggests mindfulness meditation can help us overcome the "bystander effect.

 

In the study, Paul Condon and Dave DeSteno of Northeastern University and Gaelle Desbordes of Massachusetts General Hospital assigned people with little or no meditation experience to one of two eight-week meditation classes, or put them on a wait list for a class. One class was a mindfulness meditation class geared toward focusing and calming the mind. The other covered similar terrain but also discussed compassion and suffering.

 

By Emiliana R. Simon-Thomas


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