Ishara's Year 9 Journal
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Authorities warn of STD epidemic after unsafe schoolies ditch condoms for morning-after pill

Authorities warn of STD epidemic after unsafe schoolies ditch condoms for morning-after pill | Ishara's Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
HEALTH officials have warned of an STD epidemic among schoolies as sales of the morning-after pill spike following the first weekend of celebrations.
Ishara Wijesinghe's insight:

This article, posted by the Courier Mail and written by Jeremy Pierce tells of the authorities predictions for Schoolies week for Queenslanders as sales of the morning-after pill spiked following its first weekend of celebrations. Authorities became aware that due to the morning-after pill’s high sales, the threat of STD’s emerges. From exploring this topic in class, I found that the morning-after pill is indeed a form of an emergency contraception and should only be used as the last resort. Authorities, as well as myself, find it irrational that these graduates have chosen to avoid using a condom for the Schoolies week. Knowledge attained from class booklets led me to understand that not using a condom would allow for the contraction of STD’s such as HIV/AIDS. Young people are making themselves vulnerable to diseases by taking part in reckless behaviours.  The writer refers to this as the ‘STD epidemic’ due to the fact that participants in sexual activity, relying on the morning-after pill, are increasingly susceptible to these diseases, with some being life-long or detrimental to fertility (Chlamydia).  From reading this, I asked myself-why exactly are these people choosing to rely on the morning-after pill when there are easier contraceptive methods such as the use of condoms? My train of thought led me back to a class discussion and research I carried out previously, regarding avoiding condoms. People choose to avoid condoms, particularly young adults purely because they feel it is a more pleasurable experience without the rubber sheath. The unfortunate reality is that these people are often incognisant that STD’s can still be contracted. Monash IVF Senior Fertility Specialist Dr Kee Ong recognises that the last thing these schoolies are concerned about is STDs and their future fertility. However, this is a incredibly real and serious health issue. I was interested to read that the national rate of Chlamydia has more than tripled in the past decade which means that action must be taken as it is the young people of Australia who are contributing to these rising numbers. I found this report particularly constructive in my investigation into STD’s and it’s rising effects. The article’s unbiased, accurate information supported by recent events which paint a larger picture reflecting a nation-wide dilemma; was certainly a creditable read. 

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'Lifestyle' diseases the world's biggest killer

'Lifestyle' diseases the world's biggest killer | Ishara's Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
The World Health Organisation says lifestyle diseases are now the leading cause of death around the world.
Ishara Wijesinghe's insight:

This thought-provoking article written by Alison Caldwell for ABC, informs its readers about the increasingly detrimental toll that non-communicable diseases, or chronic diseases are taking on developing countries. According to a new report from the World Health Organisation (WHO), the rise in "lifestyle" diseases is largely due to tobacco use, poor diet and the harmful use of alcohol. That is, alcohol consumption which we had learnt in the classroom in Semester 1 has in fact, contributes largely in developing lifestyle diseases. In saying that, alcohol should not be consumed with immature intentions and by all means, not at an excessive extent or state as this can lead to alcohol dependence.  The organisation warns public policies to prevent these poor practises from being undertaken on a daily basis, particularly in teenagers. Examples of non-communicable diseases include lung diseases, diabetes, heart disease and stroke. All of which can be share the same risk factors which are: tobacco use, an unhealthy diet, physical inactivity and the harmful use of alcohol. If we as responsible individuals take initiative on our own health, I believe we will have a lessened chance of developing such lifestyle diseases. It was rather concerning to read that that 9 million of the 36 million people who die every year because of non-communicable diseases die before the age of 60 years. It is important that we are made aware that aside from the fact that these diseases can make you suffer; it also can lessen your life span. Action taken to respond to this problem as indicated by the article includes the Federal Government introducing plain packaging for cigarettes. I feel that this move is necessary as smoking is a contributor to non-communicable diseases and the amount of smoking packets sold should be reduced. The reliability of this article is of a high standard and I found it useful in my research of lifestyle diseases. It furthered my current knowledge of the prevalence of non-communicable diseases in Australia and further abroad, as I believe that it is important to find out about the dilemma on a global scale too.

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TC1999's curator insight, November 25, 2013 2:44 AM

This article relates to the topic of diseases that we have been looking at for the last couple of weeks, specifically lifestyle diseases caused by various habits or environments that we may developed or become used to. 

I liked this article because I found it fascinating to consider that lifestyle diseases which are actually diseases that are caused by our  lifestyle habits such as smoking or drinking too much, is actually a bigger killer than genetic problems, or cancers in the breast or abdomen etc, which some can't help having.

This is a good article as it informs us of the problems that we can face if our generation continues to ignore advice about keeping healthy or not smoking, and also tells us ways in which we can prevent ourselves from being susceptible to such things.

 

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More than 1400 young people testing positive for chlamydia

More than 1400 young people testing positive for chlamydia | Ishara's Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
A STAGGERING number of young children are suffering from chlamydia, with more than 1400 girls and boys aged 12-15 testing positive for the sexually transmitted disease.
Ishara Wijesinghe's insight:

This recent article written by Sue Dunlevy of The Australian, draws attention to the rise of young Australians testing positive to a sexually transmitted disease (STD), more notably, Chlamydia. As I have understood from class, Chlamydia is in fact, the most common STD among young people in Australia, so I was not too surprised. The report opens by informing us that more than 1,400 girls and boys aged 12-15 testing positive for Chlamydia. This staggering number reflects the extent of today’s under-age sexual activity. Furthermore, researchers reported 10,300 children in this age group presented for testing over the past three years. I was shocked when reading that the record number of 82,000 Australians had a positive Chlamydia test last year, which makes it the largest number of cases ever recorded and makes the STD the most notified infection or disease of any kind in Australia. From reading this, I can’t stress enough the importance for education in this field for young persons. Learning about contraceptives, what to do in sexual situations, making educated decisions, I feel is all crucial to avoid such psychological, physical and emotional damage. If young people demonstrate their knowledge attained from the classroom, the number of Chlamydia cases will be lessened. This article contains an extensive amount of statistics which highlight the STD’s figures in Australia, in addition to the growth of such figures over a period of time. The report sources reliable information from the Australiasian Sexual Health Conference and provides accurate detail of the current situation arising in 2013 in relation to STD’s. Although the title is ‘More than 1400 young people testing positive for Chlamydia’ the article itself mentions other STD’s such as Gonorrhoea and Syphilis, which I am acquainted with from class studies. The article states alarming particulars including the 13,649 new cases of Gonnorhea diagnosed last year, mainly in gay men and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations. Also, the number of syphilis cases increased by 1,534 last year. Indeed, it has became apparent that STD cases are on the rise. 

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Tick away to a healthy heart - Heart Disease - Health In Focus - smh.com.au

Tick away to a healthy heart - Heart Disease - Health In Focus - smh.com.au | Ishara's Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
Millions of Australians stacking on weight from eating too much
take-away food may soon find it easier to determine what's healthy
and what's not. -
Ishara Wijesinghe's insight:

This article, posted in the Sydney Morning Herald stresses that a healthy meal with the National Heart Foundation's tick is the best option for all Australians in sustaining a healthy diet. A 'tick' approved food means it is a healthier choice when compared to similar foods.  Since we were young, and in the Year 9 PDHPE classroom context, we are told that eating healthy ensures that you will have a longer life and a better well-being. In the classroom, we have also discussed that achieving a healthy diet will reduce your risk of cancers and diseases and give you energy and keep your heart beating, your brain active, and your muscles working. With organisations such as the National Heart Foundation, our path to having such life is nurtured by their work by providing Australians with a healthy eating choice.  The report outlines what a  Heart Foundation 'tick' meal entails  and what the organisation aims to achieve. I found it interesting that analyst BIS Shrapnel confirmed that of about six million Australians who eat fast food each day, 70 per cent are looking for a healthier alternative. I believe it is due to the fact that we are exposed to numerous unhealthy fast food chains such as McDonalds and the clever advertising that goes along with it. Ms Anderson, spokeswoman for the foundation stated that in order to have a 'tick', it will have to meet tough nutrition standards for the size of the meal, saturated and trans fat, salt and vegetable or fibre content. I applaud the organisation for the work they are doing as I believe it is imperative that all Australians eat healthy as it will benefit you emotionally and physically . The 'tick' is also a simple, and easy way to inform consumers about what's in what they're eating. The article itself effectively highlights that the trouble to purchase foods can be made easier with the National Heart Foundation 'tick', and that millions Australians can benefit from this. 

 

 

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Teen driver continued stealing cars after fatal collision

Teen driver continued stealing cars after fatal collision | Ishara's Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
A Melbourne teenager who killed his friend driving a stolen car in a 2011 collision continued to steal cars and drive unlicensed following the crash, a court has heard.
Ishara Wijesinghe's insight:

This article was written in regard to a teenager who a 14 year old driver, under the influence of alcohol, lost control and crashed a  stolen Toyota Land Cruiser packed with six others in a residential area late October 2011. A 16 year old boy died and a 15 year old girl was seriously injured in this crash. This alarming article brings about the fatal consequences that may arise when intoxicated. The writer states that the driver had been drinking alcohol with his teenage passengers at a party in East Brighton shortly before the crash. In class, we have learnt that it is imperative that you do not get into a car where the driver has drunk more than 1 standard drink per hour. That is, if the driver has their full licence. In New South Wales, the driver if on their L-Plates or P-Plates must have a Zero Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC). The article then goes on to say that the teenage driver blew a blood alcohol reading of .088. I can identify that this reading made him absolutely incapable of having proper control of the motor vehicle. Additionally, drinking leads to an increase in confidence and a loosening of inhibitions. After ingesting alcohol, the drinker may be more likely to engage in dangerous or damaging risk-taking behaviour. Hence, the young driver’s self-control was limited and he felt would be able to drive. We can establish that from this case, it is evident that the predominant factor contributing to the fatal crash was the influence of alcohol.

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Liquorland shamed over reckless drinking ads

Liquorland shamed over reckless drinking ads | Ishara's Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
Liquorland has been found in breach of a voluntary code of practice in its TV advertising, with the chain's ads accused of encouraging binge drinking, underage drinking and portraying an improper link between alcohol and sport.
Ishara Wijesinghe's insight:

This article written by Eli Greenblat of the Sydney Morning Herald, acknowledges Liquorland’s violation of a voluntary code of practice in its TV advertising. The chain’s stream of commercials have been accused of supporting binge drinking, underage drinking and portraying an improper link between alcohol and sport. Similarly, in class we looked at the advertising of Vodka Cruisers, or alcopops, with its sweet cordial-like flavours such as cherry and bubble-gum, and aesthetically pleasing bottle designs. However, such brands have intentionally advertised these drinks to the wrong audience, with claiming that is purely for adult consumption but using marketing techniques on adolescents. Furthermore, the article states that five Liquorland advertisements have been banned as they involved the scenes of young adults partying, playing sport and engaging in social activities while consuming large quantities of wine, spirits or beer. These advertisements unsurprisingly sparked numerous complaints with many stunned at the promotion of excessive drinking and alcohol-fuelled parties, particularly at young ages. Although an adolescent cannot purchase a drink at a store, the impact of these ads may have influenced their need to replicate such display of alcohol at a social event. However, I believe that as they are not legally valid to buy alcohol, a teenager may acquire others help. From analysing situations in class, they might pay an older friend to buy their alcohol or even parents might supply them with bottles.

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Mother putting a name to binge culture - inMyCommunity - Perth, Western Australia

Mother putting a name to binge culture - inMyCommunity - Perth, Western Australia | Ishara's Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
CHURCHLANDS mother-of-four Samantha Menezes had her first drink at the age of 15 but today is the face of a campaign to legislate penalties to people who supply alcohol to minors without parental permission.
Ishara Wijesinghe's insight:

This article, written by Sarah Motherwell of Western Suburbs Weekly focuses on a new campaign to legislate penalties to people who supply alcohol to minors without parental permission. From in class work, research and discussions I have become cognisant of the fact that you can face charges if you are caught supplying alcohol to an underage person. I  encourage Samantha Menezes, the ambassador of the campaign, as I am against the supply of alcohol to underage adolescents since there are scarce risks on both sides of the parties. It is pleasing to hear that she received overwhelming support for an online petition she started last month with the intention to persuade the State Government to introduce laws to prevent adults from supplying alcohol to minors at private functions in private premises without the parents’ consent. Mrs Menezes reactions towards the mentality some young people today is feasible, as I am aware the majority only drink from peer pressure and the desire to fit in or have fun. This does in fact, come across as immature. She viewed their mindset towards drinking was scary and she was stunned when she heard one of her sons describe how his friends went out with the intent of “getting hammered”.  I believe this description is accurate as many teenagers do indeed attend parties with the objective of getting drunk in order to have a "good time". From knowledge obtained in class, I am aware that sometimes even teenagers have "pre-drinks" before they attend the party so they will arrive to the party already confident. However, this "confidence" may result in risk taking behaviour and unplanned decisions being made.

   
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Shocked mum fights underage drinking

Shocked mum fights underage drinking | Ishara's Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
Shelley McGrath knows better than most about the dangers of underage drinking.
Ishara Wijesinghe's insight:

This article by Beatrice Thomas of The West Australian, is written in regards to a mother, Shelley McGrath, who suffered a parent's worst nightmare- recieving a phone call that her 16 year old daughter was unconscious and an ambulance was coming to pick her up. Shelley dropped her daughter to what she assumed was a sleepover at her friend's house, but was taken to an unsupervised party with the presence of alcohol, by the friend's mother. From examining the outcomes of different people in the same case involving alchol, I was able to conlcude that the friend's mother would recieve a loss of a loss of respect and trust from Shelly and possibly other parent's mothers. Furthermore, in this case, I recognised that the other people at the party, presumably underage, would have been binge drinking, hence, consuming alcohol irresponsibly, particularly for their age. After she was rushed to hospital unconscious, they found her Blood Alcohol Concentration  (BAC) to be 0.33. which is more than six times the legal driving limit. As I have gathered in class, females tend to get intoxicated at a faster rate than males. This is because women and men have different bodies which each metabolize alcohol differently. Despite the fact that men and women may have the same amounts of alcohol, a woman’s BAC will be much higher, as indicated by Shelley's daughters of an extreme reading of 0.33% of her blood. The article then goes on to explain that she had consumed  of a cocktail of "goon", or boxed wine, and vodka. I can identify that these alcohol all contain a high amount of hard liquor, which contributed to her high reading and meant that she would have to had a less amount of the drink to actually get drunk.

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Incorrect condom use is 'common' › News in Science (ABC Science)

Incorrect condom use is 'common' › News in Science (ABC Science) | Ishara's Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
Incorrect use of condoms is undermining their effectiveness in preventing pregnancies and the spread of sexually transmitted infections, an international team of researchers has found.
Ishara Wijesinghe's insight:

This ABC article written by Dani Cooper provides insightful and accurate information regarding incorrect condom use. From studying contraceptive methods in class, I learnt that condoms are the most commonly used barrier method of contraception in the world and has an extremely low failure rate. I think that is important I had read this article as it states the ways in which condoms are commonly used incorrectly, backed up by study undertaken by the Kinsey Institute of Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction at Indiana University. According to the study which examined the condom uses of 14 countries between 1995 and 2011, there were 14 common problems associated with condom use. These problems include late application and early removal of a condom; failure to unroll the condom out fully; incorrect storage; re-use of condoms and inside-out condom use.  It distresses me that when used incorrectly whether it be because of alcohol influence or inexperience, an unplanned pregnancy may take place. From one minute mistake for example an inside-out condom, a vast amount of consequences will arise that in most cases, are regretted in the future. We must be mature in the decisions we make with sexual partners and take action to ensure that the condom is used efficiently. The study also found that up to 25.3 per cent of participants incorrectly unrolled the condom before putting it on rather than unrolling it on the penis. Between 24.3 per cent and 45.7 per cent did not leave space at the tip where semen can be collected, and between 4 per cent and 30.4 per cent of participants had put the condom on inside out and then flipped it over. In the article, Professor Stephanie Sanders vowed that collecting data on condom use errors and problems will in turn; help better inform condom intervention strategies. I wholeheartedly agree with what Professor Sanders is saying, if we as a population can learn from the common errors made universally by people, we can make the lives of ourselves and others safer.

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TC1999's curator insight, November 25, 2013 6:13 PM

This article written by Dani Cooper provides an insightful view of how incorrect condom use can actually cause pregancies and unwanted STI's. 

I liked this article because it discusses how one of most common and effective barrier method could potentially still not be enough to prevent STI's which are horrible infections that a person can recieve via sexual contact, and can even result in death.

It is a good article because Professor Sanders warns us of the harm we can put ourselves in which could come in handy if we choose not use a condom correctly. I actually agree with his argument that if we can learn from our past mistakes we can make our lives and other a lot safer.

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Overweight teenagers run risk of liver disease

Overweight teenagers run risk of liver disease | Ishara's Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
Australian teenagers are becoming so overweight they are doing the type of damage to their livers that would normally be seen in older alcoholics, researchers have found.
Ishara Wijesinghe's insight:

This article, written by Amy Cordery for the Sydney Morning Herald outlines that Australian teenagers are becoming so overweight that they are doing the type of damage to their livers that would normally be seen in older alcoholics. This startles me as an Australian teenager, reading that through poor lifestyle choices at young ages, our health can suffer. A study of 1170 otherwise healthy West Australian teenagers found that 13 per cent of the 17-year-olds they tested had a condition called fatty liver disease. As I was not acquainted with such disease, I was shocked to read  that it is normally found in older people who are overweight or obese, heavy drinkers, or have chronic conditions such as hepatitis. The disease occurs when fat builds up to become more than 10 per cent of the liver's weight, can lead to inflammation and scarring This made me realise that mature lifestyle choices such as eating healthy, exercising and not binge-drinking when you are young is certainly the way to go to lessen your chance in developing fatty liver disease. I was particularly concerned when I read that in serious cases, when cirrhosis of the liver occurs, it can lead to liver failure and even death. The article stressed that if the lifestyles of the teenagers with the condition did not improve, they could experience serious liver problems in their 30s and 40s.The possibility of suffering from a condition that people over double my age have is something that I am fearful that our generation is going through. From examining ways in which we can achieve a healthy lifestyle in order to lessen our chances in developing diseases, I feel that learning about fatty liver disease and the extent to which it impacts on Australian teenagers now, is important to learn about at my age. The reliability of the article is notable as the report sources information, statistics and studies from distinguished sources including the University of Western Australia and Dr Ayonrinde, a gastroenterologist and hepatologist.

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Research proves sunblock prevents melanoma › News in Science (ABC Science)

Research proves sunblock prevents melanoma › News in Science (ABC Science) | Ishara's Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
Ishara Wijesinghe's insight:

This article, written by Sophie Scott for ABC highlights the findings of a study by the Queensland Institute of Medical Research. The study provided the first conclusive proof that sunscreen helps prevent the development of melanoma. Even though we are consistently told to 'slip, slop slap', this article reinforces the importance of using sunscreen as it is a component of preventing skin cancer. In class, we have identified that melanoma is the most dangerous form of skin cancer. From learning this, and then reading the study, I became very concerned in what the article was addressing as it is highly relevant to myself as an adolescent living in Australia under sunny conditions. My knowledge of skin cancer was furthered when I read that more than 10,300 people are treated for melanoma, with 1430 people dying each year. These numbers startled me and encouraged me to think deeply and reflect on the effects of skin cancer on the Australian population. The study randomly assigned participants to either receive standard advice on how to use SPF15+ sunscreen, or were given sunscreen along with careful instructions and supervision. I found it alarming that after 15 years, there were twice the number of melanomas in the group members who applied sunscreen 'now and then', compared to the daily use group. After looking into this study, I am now aware that applying sunscreen regularly is of the utmost importance and has influenced me use it even on cloudy days. I am also grateful that the Australian populace can benefit through studies such as these that are consistently going on as our medical research continues to develop. The integration of statistics and notable sources such as the Queensland Institute of Medical Research heightens the fact that this article is reliable pushes me to pay attention to the fine details. 

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Alcohol putting teens at sex risk

Alcohol putting teens at sex risk | Ishara's Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
Teenagers who drink to excess more likely to engage in risky sexual behaviour, study says.
Ishara Wijesinghe's insight:

This article, written by Kate Hagan and Caroline Zielinski of The Age presents the issue of the risks involved with sex whilst under the influence. The report opens by stating that there is an increased chance that teenagers will engage in risky sexual activity such as unprotected sex. Additionally, there is the likelihood that they will have multiple partners and sex they will late regret. This information did not appear shocking to me as from lessons grasping this topic, I became aware that sex when intoxicated is  prevalent. This article presented numerous statistics that I believe adolescents would find alarming, particularly as many  go out with the sole intention to get drunk. Compulsive drinkers, who are dependent on alcohol said they were four times as likely to have had sex they later regretted. Furthermore, teenagers who were reported binge drinking were three times as likely to have had three or more sexual partners in the past year. As an adolescent myself, these statistics are worrying to read as I would not want to perform a sexual activity which I will later regret. This one unplanned decision could lead to complications in marriages, relationships and friendships as well as the risk of whether the sex was safe. I speak on behalf of those my age when I say that these risks are disapproved of. Although some may believe that sec whilst intoxicated may make you more confident, I cannot stress enough that teenagers should recognise that this could result in a plethora of long term and short term consequences. 

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Alcohol turned me into a crazed animal: Binge drinking teen blames booze for making her a violent criminal

Alcohol turned me into a crazed animal: Binge drinking teen blames booze for making her a violent criminal | Ishara's Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
Amy Roberts, from Glasgow, who has been arrested 30 times for drunken attacks - including punching police officers.
Ishara Wijesinghe's insight:

This article written by Lucy Waterlow of The Daily Mail provided an insight into the life of a criminal alcoholic Amy Roberts. Amy had been arrested 30 times and had punched a police officer and a landlord. Amy’s story reminded me of the ClickView video we viewed in class “Teenage Drinking: Facts and Fiction”. In the video the experts stated that drinking could lead to scarce short term and long term effects. Amy was experiencing a long term effect as she lost her friends, family, was criminally charged on numerous occasions and was faced with financial struggles. She states “'I don't know if I'll ever work – I'll be branded a criminal forever and it makes me feel worthless.” This just exemplifies the extent to which dependence on alcohol can bring about. Amy affirmed that the reason for her alcoholism was peer pressure at age 14 by older friends. This struck me as at this age, this is a prevalent reason for getting intoxicated. Moreover, teenagers tend to be largely influenced by people a few years their senior. They feel that this is an appropriate way to ‘fit in’ and be a part of the ‘party’. The article then goes on to inform us that Amy lacked in self-esteem as a teenager. She said the alcohol made her feel more 'confident and chatty' which in turn, helped her 'fit in' with her friends. Now that she has sought help, for which I applaud her, I cannot stress enough that responsible drinking must to be enforced more. This article appears to be credible by offering a real life example of a women. However, there is no reference to any statistics or facts. It has a striking message to all teenagers.

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breedennis's curator insight, June 1, 2013 9:30 AM

This article is about a young girl who gets arrested a lot (at least 30 times) . She gets arrested a lot because when she drinks alcohol she turns into a crazed animal and irresponsible and is very fierce 

lilly sands's curator insight, June 1, 2013 5:07 PM

This article tells us that Amy started drinking when she was only 14, but this happened as she was peer pressured by older students. She says how the alcohol turned her violent and bashing up people until she enjoyed it. She always stated she was Lacking in self-esteem as a teenager, she said the alcohol made her feel more 'confident and chatty' and helped her 'fit in' with her friends.


Samantha Schiodtz's curator insight, November 19, 2013 5:44 AM

The detrimental affects that alcohol can have on someone's life are shared in this article via this teen. Her crazed attacks leave consequences for not only herself but everyone around her. She may not realise this in the present, but alcohol can have many different outcomes on many different people. This article is good in terms of awareness. 

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Facebook joins teen drink war Lifestyle - The Mercury - The Voice of Tasmania

Facebook joins teen drink war Lifestyle - The Mercury - The Voice of Tasmania | Ishara's Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
Facebook joins teen drink war SEXUAL assault, fighting-related injuries, arrest and even death are some of the results of binge-drinking.
Ishara Wijesinghe's insight:

Zara Dawtrey of The Mercury composed this article for teenagers to recognise what other members of the community view their behaviour as. Similar to other articles I have mentioned, the writer acknowledges that educators, police and parents all believe that getting that message through to teenagers proves a constant struggle. I agree unreservedly with this point as many adolescents have a fixed mindset and it is increasingly difficult to reach the broad audience of teenagers. Federal Government's National Binge Drinking Strategy developed a campaign known as "Seriously Smashed" to target teenage drinking. This social-media based resource  features a group of underage people who hold a party that goes seriously wrong. I believe this resource will prove successful as it social-media based and explores this relevant issue in a thought-provoking way. Furthermore, the Facebook page created will also attract adolescents as option to "like" the page will encourage them recieve updates regarding safe drinking. Those who were interviewed in this article pitched forward ideas that were very much so relevant to the topic studied in class. They were asked "What are some negative impacts of binge drinking?", Nick Pearsall answers "People thinking it's okay to act like bogans, walking around damaging property and causing trouble". Nick's response was relevant to the teenagers who get heavily intoxicated, do not have supportive friends and ultimately, have not made responsible decisions throughout the night. Brydie Jones answered "Engaging in sexual activity, stealing and fighting". Brydie was correct when saying that they engage sexual activity as in class I became aware that most sex occured whilst drunk. With the active participation from the community to discourage teenagers from binge drinking, and enforcement from the government, there will be a lessened amount of injuries, deaths and predicaments brought about. 

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AMA and College of Emergency Medicine doctors demand action on binge-drinking

AMA and College of Emergency Medicine doctors demand action on binge-drinking | Ishara's Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
EMERGENCY doctors are calling for drastic measures to end the nation's binge-drinking problem, including shaming drunks with video of their behaviour in hospitals.
Ishara Wijesinghe's insight:

This article is written by Sue Dunlevy of News Limited Newspapers with the purpose of informing Australians about the adverse effects of alcohol as hospitals have recognised that there has been dramatic increase in patients admitted into the intensive-care ward. Their behaviour has become prevalent in the hospital with a video posted of drunks doning irresponsible behaviour. As indicated by this article, studies have proven that one in three  adolescents consume so much alcohol at least once a month that they lose their memory. These alarming statistics suggest that there must be more restrictions pertaining to underage binge drinking enforced in Australia. A vast amount of action has been taken to reduce binge drinking cases as I have gathered from class and my insight into the media. These include restricting alcohol trading hours, promotion and availability had been proven to work. The article states that having doctors and nurses talk to patients about alcohol use could prove to be effective. I tend to agree with this statement as I believe that the drinkers need to hear from a direct professional source in order to stop drinking excessively.  The article concluded with the deliberation of whether a floor price on alcohol or a change in taxation from the Government's Australian National Preventive Health Agency might limit binge drinking. 

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Is There a Link Between Underage Drinking, Rape and Violence?

Is There a Link Between Underage Drinking, Rape and Violence? | Ishara's Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
When two adolescent boys were found guilty earlier this month of raping a teenage girl in Steubenville, Ohio, there was much discussion about rape culture, social media, and whether taking advantage of a passed out girl is just boys’ nature.
Ishara Wijesinghe's insight:

This article addresses the correlation between underage drinking, rape and violence particularly in adolescents. The writer opens by stating a horrific story about two teenage boys raping a teenage girl. From exploring the consequences of alcohol leading to unplanned decisions in class, I became aware that rape was a possible outcome and that with responsible drinking these events may be avoided . The article goes on to say that it was in fact the influence of alcohol on both parties that contributed to the rape. From class discussions, it became increasingly apparent that  many young people binge drink (consume a lot of alcohol in a short period of time). The writer acknowledges this while also stating that people under the age of 21 consume alcohol regardless of the legal U.S. drinking age. This act remains consistent with those performed by Australian adolescents even though the the drinking age is lower-18. It was further alarming to read that a large proportion of violent crimes involve alcohol use. The writer expands on this point by affirming that the crimes were attributed to a variety of factors, including the fact that alcohol inhibits self-control and limits the ability to assess risk. This was a crucial fact addressed as teenagers often to not look at the toll alcohol takes on their body. Ultimately, this article is a beneficial resource in understanding the risks, research and reality of drinking underage.

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