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Collection of Resources for Today's Science Teachers
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How the Speed of Light was First Measured | Karl Smallwood | Today I Found Out

How the Speed of Light was First Measured | Karl Smallwood | Today I Found Out | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

The speed of light in a vacuum stands at “exactly 299,792,458 metres per second“. The reason today we can put an exact figure on it is because the speed of light in a vacuum is a universal constant that has been measured with lasers; and when an experiment involves lasers, it’s hard to argue with the results. As to why it comes out somewhat conspicuously as a whole number, this is no coincidence- the length of metre is defined using this constant: “the length of the path travelled by light in vacuum during a time interval of 1/299,792,458 of a second.” Prior to a few hundred years ago, it was generally agreed or at least assumed that the speed of light was infinite, when in actuality it’s just really, really, really fast- for reference, the speed of light is just slightly slower than the fastest thing in the known universe- a teenage girl’s response time if Justin Bieber were to say on Twitter, “The first to reply to this tweet will be my new girlfriend.” The first known person to question the whole “speed of light is infinite” thing was the 5th century BC philosopher Empedocles. Less than a century later, Aristotle would disagree with Empedocles and the argument continued for more than 2,000 years after.

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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6 Outstanding Augmented Reality Apps for Science Teachers ~ EdTech and MLearning

6 Outstanding Augmented Reality Apps for Science Teachers ~ EdTech and MLearning | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“ Augmented Reality (AR) technologies are making some huge leaps into the educational landscape transforming the way teaching and learning are taking place. Educators and teachers are increasingly adopting AR technologies in their classrooms. As extensions of the physical world, AR technologies amplify its dimensions and bring life to its static constituents. There are a variety of ways you can use AR in your class. For instance, you can use them to take your students into virtual field trips, visit world museums, animate and enrich textbook content and many more.”
Via John Evans, Lars-Göran Hedström
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GwynethJones's curator insight, February 14, 2016 9:55 AM

Share this with your Science! Teachers!

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Shape-Shifting Material Can Lift 1,000 Times Its Own Mass

Shape-Shifting Material Can Lift 1,000 Times Its Own Mass | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“ Engineers from the University of Rochester have produced a new shape-changing polymer that rapidly responds to body heat. This remarkable new mighty morphing material, which can lift objects up to 1,000 times its own mass, is showcased in the Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics.”
Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Integration and Teaching: Ed Tech
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How Adaptive Learning Tech Transforms STEM Education

How Adaptive Learning Tech Transforms STEM Education | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Many of today’s classrooms look much like they did 100 years ago: rows of desks, lecture-based instruction, and a one-size-fits all method of instruction.


Via David W. Deeds
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, February 16, 2016 5:47 PM

Interesting stuff! 

Rescooped by John Purificati from STEM Connections
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Gravitational waves: Numbers don't do them justice - BBC News

Gravitational waves: Numbers don't do them justice - BBC News | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Jonathan Amos reflects on the significance of Thursday’s announcement – and the mind-boggling scale of the black hole merger itself.


Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, February 13, 2016 12:03 PM

This is a great example of how an illustration can really help improve your story and make a stronger impression than words alone.

Rescooped by John Purificati from STEM Connections
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How a Failed Experiment Turned Into a Stunning Medical Breakthrough (Video)

How a Failed Experiment Turned Into a Stunning Medical Breakthrough (Video) | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“ The fascinating video above tells the story of MIT Professor Ioannis Yannas, who was recently inducted into the National Inventor’s Hall of Fame alongs ...”
Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Technology in Business Today
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x2 Sport: World's First Wearable Underwater Jet Pack

x2 Sport: World's First Wearable Underwater Jet Pack | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“Featuring a powerful propulsion system, the x2 Sport Jet Pack allows you to stay underwater for longer duration, without using any scuba gear”
Via TechinBiz
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Blue Origin reflies New Shepard suborbital vehicle | SpaceNews.com

Blue Origin reflies New Shepard suborbital vehicle | SpaceNews.com | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON — Blue Origin successfully launched and landed Jan. 22 the same New Shepard vehicle that flew in November, a demonstration of the vehicle’s reusability and the latest round of one-upmanship in its rivalry with SpaceX.The suborbital New Shepard vehicle took off from Blue Origin’s test site in West Texas early Jan. 22 and reached a peak altitude of 101.7 kilometers. The vehicle’s conical crew capsule separated and parachuted to a soft landing, while the cylindrical propulsion module made a powered vertical landing on a landing pad several kilometers from the launch site.“The very same New Shepard booster that flew above the Karman line and then landed vertically at its launch site last November has now flown and landed again, demonstrating reuse,” company founder Jeff Bezos wrote in a blog post late Jan. 22. The von Karman line, an altitude of 100 kilometers, is a commonly used, although not universally accepted, boundary of space.


Via Stratocumulus
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Phys.org - News and Articles on Science and Technology

Phys.org - News and Articles on Science and Technology | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Space Science, Earth Science, Health and Medicine


Via Margarida Sá Costa
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Daily Magazine
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Black Holes Set the Clock for Life on Earth

Black Holes Set the Clock for Life on Earth | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“Does Earth belong to the first generation of habitable planets in the universe? One astrophysicist's work suggest it's possible, although we may never know for sure.”
Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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Would You Go to Mars? Meet the Four Women Astronauts Who Can't Wait to Go | Ginny Graves | Glamour.com

Would You Go to Mars? Meet the Four Women Astronauts Who Can't Wait to Go | Ginny Graves | Glamour.com | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

In first grade Jessica Meir made a drawing of herself standing on the moon. Turns out she underestimated her own ambition: Today, at 38, Meir could become the first human to touch down on an even farther destination: Mars. A next step for man? Yes, and a giant leap for womankind. The mission itself is at least 15 years away—it will take that long to build and test every last piece of equipment. But it's already the most hotly anticipated space-exploration effort ever. Governments around the world—in China, Europe, and Russia—have plans in the works to at least land robots on Mars, while in the U.S., private companies like SpaceX are partnering with NASA on a human mission and plotting their own commercial trips. And unlike the 1960s race to the moon, this time women are playing pivotal roles—building rockets, designing space suits, and controlling the remote rovers that are already sending momentous insights back from Mars. A human landing will not, to put it mildly, be easy.

Click headline to read more including the interview--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Too Many Kids Quit Science Because They Don't Think They're Smart | Alexandra Ossola | The Atlantic

Too Many Kids Quit Science Because They Don't Think They're Smart | Alexandra Ossola | The Atlantic | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

For most students, science, math, engineering, and technology (STEM) subjects are not intuitive or easy. Learning in general—and STEM in particular—requires repeated trial and error, and a student’s lack of confidence can sometimes stand in her own way. And although teachers and parents may think they are doing otherwise, these adults inadvertently help kids make up their minds early on that they're not natural scientists or “math people,” which leads them to pursue other subjects instead. So what's the best way to help kids feel confident enough to stay the STEM course? To answer this question, I spoke with Carol Dweck, a professor of psychology at Stanford University in California. Over the past 20 years, Dweck has conducted dozens of studies about praise’s impact on students’ self-esteem and academic achievement. Here is a transcript of our conversation, which has been condensed and lightly edited.

Click headline to read the interview--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Increasing the profit ratio | The Space Review

Increasing the profit ratio | The Space Review | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

SpaceX recovered its first stage from a successful orbital launch. Sam Dinkin assesses progress of SpaceX toward its goal of reducing the cost of launch by two orders of magnitude.


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Rescooped by John Purificati from Future Technology
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NASA developing next generation of Supersonic Planes

NASA developing next generation of Supersonic Planes | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Jets of the future could take you anywhere in the world in six hours or less


Via TechinBiz
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Rescooped by John Purificati from STEM Connections
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A Decades-Long Quest to Drill Into Earth's Mantle May Soon Hit Pay Dirt

A Decades-Long Quest to Drill Into Earth's Mantle May Soon Hit Pay Dirt | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“ Geologists have had to contend with bad luck, budget cuts and the race to the moon in their efforts to drill deep into our planet”

Tags: physical, tectonics, geology.


Via Seth Dixon, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Rescooped by John Purificati from STEM Connections
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Experience Mars in 360 Degrees With This New NASA Video via @danielatlarge

Experience Mars in 360 Degrees With This New NASA Video via @danielatlarge | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

NASA made it much easier to explore Mars this week when the agency released a video featuring a 360-degree view of the planet.


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Educational Technology and Mobile Lerarning
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3 Amazing Chrome Apps for Human Anatomy ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

3 Amazing Chrome Apps for Human Anatomy ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Via Educatorstechnology
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Daily Magazine
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The Amazing Benefit of Heat as a Cancer Treatment!

The Amazing Benefit of Heat as a Cancer Treatment! | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“Dr. Isaac Eliaz discusses a form of cancer treatment that is popular in other parts of the world and can be much easier on the body than chemo or radiation. Find out what different kinds of this treatment are available and how it can work.”
Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Future Technology
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New Anesthetic Method Uses Electric Current Instead Of Painful Needles

New Anesthetic Method Uses Electric Current Instead Of Painful Needles | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“Scientists at Brazil’s University of São Paulo have devised a new technique of administering anesthetic in a patient’s mouth, without using needles.”
Via TechinBiz
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Rescooped by John Purificati from The NewSpace Daily
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Bridging the past and future on the shoulders of the Atlas rocket | Spaceflight Now

Bridging the past and future on the shoulders of the Atlas rocket | Spaceflight Now | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

CAPE CANAVERAL — On top of an Atlas rocket, the place where orbital spaceflight for American astronauts began, will sit Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft to launch humans into space starting next year.It was Feb. 20, 1962 when an Atlas D booster blasted off with Project Mercury’s Friendship 7 capsule and John Glenn to become the nation’s first person to orbit the Earth.More than a half-century later, a bold new era of commercial travel to and from space is about to start, and Atlas rockets will again play a pivotal role.


Via Stratocumulus
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Space
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SpaceX launches new age of spaceflight @investorseurope #onlinetradingparadigm

SpaceX launches new age of spaceflight @investorseurope #onlinetradingparadigm | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

SpaceX launches new age of spaceflight @investorseurope #onlinetradingparadigm:

With first stage return company takes a key step toward low-cost access to space.


Via Investors Europe Stock Brokers, Margarida Sá Costa
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Investors Europe Stock Brokers's curator insight, December 22, 2015 12:31 AM

SpaceX launches new age of spaceflight @investorseurope #onlinetradingparadigm :

In some ways, the mission marks the dawn of a new space age. It begins to deliver on the promise of reusable launch vehicles, which is critical to increasing access to space. SpaceX's founder, Elon Musk, has said it costs the company about $60 million to build a Falcon 9 rocket. The propellant itself only costs $200,000. Thus there is the potential to slash the costs of spaceflight by 10, or even 100 times.

Rescooped by John Purificati from Educational technology , Erate, Broadband and Connectivity
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NASA Resources and Teacher Training Help Students See Stars

NASA Resources and Teacher Training Help Students See Stars | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“ Discoveries from the Hubble Space Telescope inspire astronomical interest and down-to-earth lesson plans.”
Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Rescooped by John Purificati from STEM Connections
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Free Technology for Teachers: Ten Good Video Sources for Science Teachers and Students

Free Technology for Teachers: Ten Good Video Sources for Science Teachers and Students | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, January 8, 2016 10:30 AM

Try out some of these resources to engage your students.

Rescooped by John Purificati from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Scientists teach bacterium a new trick for artificial photosynthesis

Scientists teach bacterium a new trick for artificial photosynthesis | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“Trainers of dogs, horses, and other animal performers take note: a bacterium named Moorella thermoacetica has been induced to perform only a single trick, but it's a doozy. Berkeley Lab researchers are using M. thermoacetica ...”
Via Mary Williams
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