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Collection of Resources for Today's Science Teachers
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Free Technology for Teachers: Biology Pop - Videos, Articles, and Apps About Biology

Free Technology for Teachers: Biology Pop - Videos, Articles, and Apps About Biology | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Biology Pop is a site that features videos, articles, games, and reviews of apps about topics in biology. The site features content in seven categories; anatomy, cell biology, biotechnology, genetics, ecology, evolution, and taxonomy. You can browse through the categories in a Pinterest-like style. An option to search by media type is also available.

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The Tortoise Beetles - Amazing Metallic Arthropods

The Tortoise Beetles - Amazing Metallic Arthropods | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Tortoise beetles look almost manufactured.   Many tortoise beetles have transparent cuticles, the tough but flexible outer covering which gives the insect family its name protects the delicate creature within.  The living tissue is often metallic in color and can in some species even change color.  The combination is as diverse as it is extraordinary – many look like tiny robots assembled to infiltrate, the ultimate bug. Take a look in at the amazing variations of tortoise beetle our world holds.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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RadioShack DIY

RadioShack DIY | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

"We want to know what great creations you've come up with using RadioShack parts. Our goal is to gather the coolest projects from our most creative customers and share them here. So, show us what you've got and submit your project now. Let the making begin."


Jim Lerman's insight:


Nifty site RadioShack has put together with a large number of projects made using parts they sell. Readers can submit their own projects and others come from participating partners Wired, Popular Science, Instructables, Popular Mechanics, and Make.


Via Jim Lerman
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Cloudy With a Chance of Space Weather

Cloudy With a Chance of Space Weather | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Worried about an important satellite transmission? The UK's Meteorological Office will begin offering daily space weather forecasts to warn against solar storms that can knock out power grids, radios, and satellite-based tech like GPS.
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Science Daily: News & Articles in Science, Health, Environment & Technology

Science Daily: News & Articles in Science, Health, Environment & Technology | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Today's Top Science News
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Bizarre Silk Structures in the Amazon: Is it the Work of a Spider?

Bizarre Silk Structures in the Amazon: Is it the Work of a Spider? | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

After six months of speculation, we finally know what’s building these bizarre silk structures in the Amazon: a spider! But its precise identity is still a mystery that scientists are scrambling to solve.

 

The bizarre structures first surfaced on the internet late this summer, when graduate student Troy Alexander posted photos to Reddit and Facebook, hoping that somebody could tell him what the structures were. He had discovered them on a small island near the Tambopata Research Center, deep in the Peruvian Amazon.

 

Made out of silk, the intricate constructions have two parts: a tall, central tower, and a circular fence that’s about 6 millimeters across. Back then, we asked as many entomologists as we could find, but no one had any idea what the structures were, or what made them. Until now.

 

Last week we followed these spider-hunting scientists, led by entomologist Phil Torres, deep into the Amazon rainforest as they attempted to find the tiny silk towers and figure out where they came from. It has not been an easy case to crack.

 

Before sunrise on Dec. 10, Torres’ team went to the same small island. As the skies brightened and the mists lifted, they started walking through the forest. A half-hour later, Torres had spotted the first of the tiny towers. Much smaller than he had expected, the structure was on the bark of a cecropia tree, nestled near some branches.

 

“With a lot of other weird mysteries, once you make an observation of some sort, spend enough time out there, the pieces kind of fit together,” said Torres, a graduate student at Rice University. “I’m surprised by how difficult this one is to solve.”

 

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Vloasis's curator insight, December 26, 2013 10:19 PM

It takes an unusual critter to fashion those!

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The Dramatic Expanse of Antarctica's Noctilucent Clouds

It's summer at the South Pole, which means it's time for the frozen continent's noctilucent clouds to make an appearance.
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The Nucleus: Crash Course Chemistry #1 - YouTube

Hank does his best to convince us that chemistry is not torture, but is instead the amazing and beautiful science of stuff. Chemistry can tell us how three t...
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Space suit issue prompts delay of second spacewalk

Space suit issue prompts delay of second spacewalk | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Astronauts removed an old space station pump Saturday, sailing through the first of a series of urgent repair spacewalks to revive a crippled cooling line.
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OCO-2 Observatory Conducts Environmental Tests | NASA.gov

OCO-2 Observatory Conducts Environmental Tests | NASA.gov | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO)-2 spacecraft is moved into a thermal vacuum chamber at Orbital Sciences Corporation's Satellite Manufacturing Facility in Gilbert, Ariz., for a series of environmental tests.

 

The tests confirmed the integrity of the observatory's electrical connections and subjected the OCO-2 instrument and spacecraft to the extreme hot, cold and airless environment they will encounter once in orbit. The observatory's solar array panels were removed prior to the test.

 

OCO-2 is NASA's first mission dedicated to studying atmospheric carbon dioxide and is the latest mission in NASA's study of the global carbon cycle. Carbon dioxide is the most significant human-produced greenhouse gas and the principal human-produced driver of climate change.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Top 100 Penguin Facts : Discovery Channel

Top 100 Penguin Facts : Discovery Channel | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Count down the Top 100 Penguin Facts. You'll be amazed at what you don't know about penguins!
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54-Year-Old Message in a Bottle Found in Canadian Arctic

54-Year-Old Message in a Bottle Found in Canadian Arctic | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
A 54-year-old message in a bottle was found on Ward Hunt Island, a remote island in the northernmost part of the Canadian Arctic.
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Did you know vampire squid are actually vegetarians?

Did you know vampire squid are actually vegetarians? | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Terrifying though it certainly appears, the scarlet-bodied, cloudy-eyed Vampyroteuthis infernalis (aka "vampire squid from hell") isn't the least bit scary from a dietary standpoint.
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Glowing "Meteor Smoke" Clouds Appear Over Antarctica

Glowing "Meteor Smoke" Clouds Appear Over Antarctica | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
NASA reports that rare, electric blue noctilucent clouds have reappeared over the South Pole, where the clouds are often spotted for five to ten days every year.
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Bridging the Gender Gap: Encouraging Girls in STEM Starts at Home | Alicia Chang Blog | Huff Post.com

Bridging the Gender Gap: Encouraging Girls in STEM Starts at Home | Alicia Chang Blog | Huff Post.com | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

The 21st century has been defined by rapid innovation in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields -- a trend showing no signs of slowing down. In 2011, women surpassed men in attaining bachelor's and advanced degrees for the first time, according to the U.S. Census.

 

Despite these developments, a gender gap persists in the STEM workforce and is only getting wider. In computer science, only 18 percent of American college majors are women, a number that has been declining over the last 30 years (National Center for Women & Information Technology, 2012). When it comes to university professors, just 17 percent of tenure-track faculty in mathematics are female, and a paltry 11 percent in engineering (National Science Foundation, 2008).

 

Even with vast differences in the pursuit of STEM careers, it is notable that standardized measures of math performance show no meaningful differences between males and females from elementary school through college.

 

There are many factors that might influence a girl or young woman's decision to pursue a particular career path. While the majority of studies show no differences in STEM ability, a large divide in perceived competence starts as early as age five. One study found that by the spring of kindergarten, boys have a greater willingness to learn math concepts.

 

By third grade, boys rate their own math competence higher than girls do, even though no differences in actual performance are found. If girls do not expect to succeed in math and other STEM domains as early as elementary school, it is not surprising that by college, their interests have shifted to fields in which they feel more confident.

 

There is also a widely held stereotype that boys possess more innate STEM ability than girls, which has been found to impact children's performance. Girls as young as seven have been shown to underperform on math tasks when their gender has been made salient.

 

Furthermore, several studies have found that children are socialized differently regarding mathematics based on gender. Boys tend to receive more encouragement in math from parents and teachers, and mothers overestimate boys' abilities compared to girls'.

 

When discussing an interactive exhibit at a science museum, parents have been found to explain scientific concepts three times more often to boys than girls. And even at very young ages, children tend to receive gender-specific toys that may promote STEM skills such as building or spatial reasoning more to boys.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Space startup competes for Google Lunar X prize with rare mineral moon delivery service

Space startup competes for Google Lunar X prize with rare mineral moon delivery service | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Google's Lunar X competition asks competitors to successfully land a vehicle on the moon -- and one group believes a delivery service could fit the bill.

 

Startup Moon Express, a team of young engineers, have created the MX-1, a spacecraft designed to deliver payloads to the moon as well as bring back objects of its own -- a tantalising prospect for both researchers and potentially firms seeking rare minerals.

 


Via Stratocumulus
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2013 3D Printing Year in Review

Each year at Shapeways, we like to do a roundup of amazing accomplishments in the rapidly evolving 3D Printing world — often powered by the innovations and cr

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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10 most-read science stories of 2013

10 most-read science stories of 2013 | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Stories about a body-heat powered flashlight, the sun's pending magnetic flip and a study on penis size were some of the most read science stories on CBCNews.ca this year. Did you miss them? Here's your chance to catch up.
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Museum of Science and Industry: Simple Machines Game

Museum of Science and Industry: Simple Machines Game | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Game with challenges to create simple machines that help adorable-but-lazy Twitch do his work.

Via Dale Borgeson
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Dale Borgeson's curator insight, December 24, 2013 12:20 PM

The games are super fun and the there is plenty of solid information to support the activities as very good learning tools. 

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Nomenclature Practice - Mr. Dunbar

Nomenclature Practice - Mr. Dunbar | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Course site for Mr. Dunbar at RCI
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Chemistry Webercises Directory

Chemistry Webercises Directory | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
John Purificati's insight:

Tons of good chem stuff to be found here .

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Yale Scientific Magazine | The Nation's Oldest College Science Publication – The Chemistry Behind Breaking Bad

Yale Scientific Magazine | The Nation's Oldest College Science Publication – The Chemistry Behind Breaking Bad | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

As the Emmy-award-winning hit television series, Breaking Bad, approaches its series expiration date in its fifth season, many avid fans still wonder: is there validity behind the science fiction?

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Green Technology Depends on Metals with Weird Names: Scientific American

Green Technology Depends on Metals with Weird Names: Scientific American | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
A supply of clean, affordable energy depends on little-known substances
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Whoops! Earth's Oldest 'Diamonds' Actually Polishing Grit

Whoops! Earth's Oldest 'Diamonds' Actually Polishing Grit | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Evidence of Earth's first continents, 4.3-billion-year-old "diamonds" from Australia's Jack Hills, are actually fragments of polishing grit, a new study reports.
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Flu Vaccine and Gender Differences: MedlinePlus Health News Video

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