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Collection of Resources for Today's Science Teachers
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Rescooped by John Purificati from 21st Century Concepts-Technology in the Classroom
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Explore The Wonders Of Life On Earth With This New App From Prof. Brian Cox

Explore The Wonders Of Life On Earth With This New App From Prof. Brian Cox | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

After taking you on a trip across the universe, HarperCollins and Prof. Brian Cox are now inviting you to take part in a journey set much closer to home. In fact, it’s set right on our dear home planet, Earth.


Via KiwiBelma, Tom Perran
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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NPR blogs: Trees On The Move As Temperature Zones Shift 3.8 Feet A Day

NPR blogs: Trees On The Move As Temperature Zones Shift 3.8 Feet A Day | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
To keep pace with the present rate of temperature change, plants and animals have to migrate poleward a few feet a day, according to a team of ecologists. If they can't, they may not survive.

Via Mary Williams
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Teaching and learning with iPads
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Nine of the best science apps for the iPad/iPho...

Nine of the best science apps for the iPad/iPho... | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
The iPad is ushering a revolution in the world of education. Now, not only can you read about information, you can interact with it as well, even if you’re nowhere near lab or can’t perform hands-on experiments.

Via Madeleine Walton
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice
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STEM Education: Over 25 STEAM Links Filled With Resources and Information

STEM Education: Over 25 STEAM Links Filled With Resources and Information | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“ Welcome to a post devoted to turning STEM to STEAM. It is exciting to cover the topic of STEAM since it is important to include the Arts. I have also included 25 resources to help make it happen!”
Via Dean J. Fusto
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Rescooped by John Purificati from School Leaders on iPads & Tablets
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Nine of the best science apps for the iPad/iPhone

Nine of the best science apps for the iPad/iPhone | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
The iPad is ushering a revolution in the world of education. Now, not only can you read about information, you can interact with it as well, even if you’re nowhere near lab or can’t perform hands-on experiments. It also allows you to gain access to a museum’s exhibits without ever having to leave your desk (or bed, or bench, but possibly not your bath).We’ve collected nine of the best science-based education apps out there, from old classics to brand new additions. Together, they will show you what you can achieve with today’s technology and perhaps open your mind to what will be possible in the future.
Via John Evans, Mel Riddile
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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What’s Preventing Students Interested In Science From Pursuing Careers In STEM? | Annie Murphy Paul Blog

What’s Preventing Students Interested In Science From Pursuing Careers In STEM? | Annie Murphy Paul Blog | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
People in education and industry who would like more students to go into the group of fields known as STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) have mostly focused on how to get students interested in these disciplines. But a new report finds that there are significant number of students out there who are already interested in STEM—but don’t plan to pursue a STEM job.The report was released by ACT, the organization that administers the college-admissions exam. It examines two types of interest among students: the “expressed” interest students voice when they say they plan to to pursue a particular major or occupation, and the “measured” interest students reveal when they fill out the ACT Interest Inventory, which measures preferences for different types of work.Writing in T.H.E. Journal (Technological Horizons in Education), Christopher Piehler notes:“A total of 48 percent of the ACT-tested 2013 graduates had expressed and/or measured interest in STEM, including 16 percent who had both. Twenty-three percent had only expressed interest, planning to pursue a STEM career even though their inventory results suggested that other fields may be better aligned to their interests. But nearly one out of every 10 graduates (9 percent) had only measured interest in STEM; they had no plans to pursue a STEM major or career despite their interest in doing so.”This disjunction is surprising, because STEM jobs are some of the fastest-growing, best-paid, and most-prestigious around. I wonder if the disconnection is partly produced by students’ misconceptions about what scientists are like and what they do. These misconceptions are widespread, as I wrote in a previous post on the Brilliant Blog. Here’s an excerpt:Click headline to read more--
Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Physics
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Researchers discover antifreeze protein with water filled core

Researchers discover antifreeze protein with water filled core | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —A team of researches with Queen's University, in Canada has found that the antifreeze protein Maxi, defies the normal expectations of a protein by having a core filled with water molecules. In their paper published in the journal Science, describing their research with the protein, the ...

Via Mikko Hakala
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Mikko Hakala's curator insight, February 16, 2014 4:20 AM

Interesting finding of water inside a protein.

Rescooped by John Purificati from digital divide information
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For 3-D Interfaces, a Long Road to Acceptance | MIT Technology Review

For 3-D Interfaces, a Long Road to Acceptance | MIT Technology Review | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
It may take years for 3-D gesture-control to catch on with consumers and app developers.

Via Helen Farley, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Rescooped by John Purificati from STEM Connections
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50 Amazing Finds on Google Earth

50 Amazing Finds on Google Earth | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

"You’ve no doubt already come across some interesting finds on Google Earth. The post below attempts to compile the most fascinating sites other have stumbled upon browsing Google Earth. From natural formations to human structures, the world is a different place when viewed from above.  If you’re interested in seeing any of the places yourself, I’ve included the coordinates for every image shown below. Just copy and paste into Google Earth/Maps and explore for yourself!"


Via Seth Dixon, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Ann Marie Pelosky Poncet's curator insight, February 14, 2014 8:07 AM

IF you don't have time or money to travel, you can do so by following this link.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, February 14, 2014 10:26 PM

yes amazing geographic tool. I love zeroing in on Africa- so much more than sand and empty spaces.

ruth

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 2014 2:09 PM

When first reading this and viewing the images that go along with it; it became clear that someone somewhere in te world was either looking for these or they stumbled across these specfic faces and shapes in the earth that we dont neccesarily get to see everyday. 28. Monkey Face 65.476721, -173.511416 Russia. This Russian Monkey face was very interesting to see and I would have never thought that their would be these types of images captured.  

Rescooped by John Purificati from Sustainability Science
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How Weather Forecasts Can Help Optimize Energy Usage

How Weather Forecasts Can Help Optimize Energy Usage | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University of Adelaide have been exploring how using public weather forecast information can help deliver significant reductions in energy consumption.

 

Combining information from the Bureau of Meteorology with data from existing building management systems, the researchers have developed an intelligent model that remains one step ahead of the building’s temperature changes, automatically adjusting the heating and cooling supply accordingly.

Early experimental results have provided encouraging results, with at least 10 per cent energy savings shown to be possible.


Via Lauren Moss, PIRatE Lab
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Rescooped by John Purificati from The NewSpace Daily
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Orbital’s success in space reflected in the balance sheets | NASASpaceFlight.com

Orbital’s success in space reflected in the balance sheets | NASASpaceFlight.com | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Orbital Sciences Corporation have revealed their latest financial figures, portraying a very healthy company that enjoyed a successful 2013, while looking forward to a bright future. With their new vehicles – Antares and Cygnus – now conducting operational missions in resupplying the International Space Station (ISS), Orbital’s forward path includes billions of dollars worth of orders.

 

 


Via Stratocumulus
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Rescooped by John Purificati from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Find Science Lesson Plans, Videos, and Animations on BioInteractive

Find Science Lesson Plans, Videos, and Animations on BioInteractive | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Rescooped by John Purificati from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
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Google Science Fair 2014 kicks off to find bright young scientists with ideas to change the world - TNW

Google Science Fair 2014 kicks off to find bright young scientists with ideas to change the world - TNW | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

"Google has kicked off Google Science Fair 2014, its annual online competition for bright, creative and ambitious teenagers who want to change the world with science."


Via John Evans
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Physics
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Big bang birthday: Six mysteries of a cosmic bombshell - space - 20 February 2014 - New Scientist

Big bang birthday: Six mysteries of a cosmic bombshell - space - 20 February 2014 - New Scientist | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Fifty years since the first confirmed signal of the big bang and physicists are still wrestling with the questions it raises about the nature of the

Via Mikko Hakala
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Android Apps in Education
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Free Technology for Teachers: Create Virtual Chemical Reactions on Your iPad or Android Tablet

Free Technology for Teachers: Create Virtual Chemical Reactions on Your iPad or Android Tablet | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Via Rhondda Powling
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Rhondda Powling's curator insight, February 20, 2014 2:38 AM

This might be a way to offer experiences if you can't get into a lab.

Rescooped by John Purificati from EdTech Evolution - Mapping the Intersection of tech, innovation, and instruction
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Great Apps, Games, and Websites to Move Your Students Full STEAM Ahead!

Great Apps, Games, and Websites to Move Your Students Full STEAM Ahead! | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“ "We especially need imagination in science.”
Via Dean J. Fusto
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Daily Magazine
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Human lung made in lab for first time

Human lung made in lab for first time | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“For the first time, scientists have created human lungs in a lab -- an exciting step forward in regenerative medicine.”
Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Amazing Science
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How NASA is Planning to 3D Print Trees in Space

How NASA is Planning to 3D Print Trees in Space | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
The Stanford University researchers have been working long hours honing a three-dimensional printing process to make biomaterials like wood and enamel out of mere clumps of cells. Pundits say such 3D bioprinting has vast potential, and could one day be widely used to transform specially engineered cells into structural beams, food, and human tissue. Rothschild and Gentry don’t only see these laboratory-created materials helping only doctors and Mars voyagers. They also envision their specific research – into so-called “synthetic biomaterials” – changing the way products like good-old-fashioned wooden two-by-fours are made and used by consumers.Here’s their plan: Rothschild, an evolutionary biologist who works for NASA and teaches astrobiology at Stanford, and Gentry, her doctoral advisee who is trained in biology and mechanical engineering, are working with $100,000 they received last fall from the space agency’s Innovative Advanced Concept Program. They say they’re on track to prove their concept by October: a three-dimensional printing process that yields arrays of cells that can excrete non-living structural biomaterials like wood, mineral parts of bone and tooth enamel. They’re building a massive database of cells already in nature, refining the process of engineering select cells to make and then excrete (or otherwise deliver) the desired materials, and tweaking hardware that three-dimensionally prints modified cells into arrays that yield the non-living end products.“Cells produce an enormous array of products on the Earth, everything from wool to silk to rubber to cellulose, you name it, not to mention meat and plant products and the things that we eat,” Rothschild said. “Many of these things are excreted (from cells). So you’re not going to take a cow or a sheep or a probably not a silk worm or a tree to Mars. But you might want to have a very fine veneer of either silk or wood. So instead of taking the whole organism and trying to make something, why couldn’t you do this all in a very precise way – which actually may be a better way to do it on Earth as well – so that you’re printing an array of cells that then can secrete or produce these products?”Rothschild and Gentry’s setup is different from using basic 3D printers that deliver final products. Instead, the NASA-funded researchers are using 3D printing as an enabling technology of sorts. Their setup involves putting cells in a gelling solution with some sort of chemical signaling and support into a piezoelectric print head that spits out cells that form a gel-based 3D pattern.Andrew Hessel, a biotechnology analyst who is a distinguished researcher with San Rafael, Calif.-based Autodesk Inc., said the emerging field of 3D bioprinting is a “pretty wide open space” with different researchers “all dancing on multiple fronts at once.” And the research is not without controversy. Information-technology research firm Gartner, Inc. recently predicted 3D printing of living tissue and organs will soon spur a major ethical debate.Hessel said the most-complex 3D bioprinting research is being done with the actual engineering of cells. Companies like Organovo, for example, aren’t actually engineering the cells, and instead are differentiating and laying them in a way that they can mature and grow in to functional tissue.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by John Purificati from The NewSpace Daily
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Get off my Lunar lawn - 7.04 | YouTube

In space news we look at the rebirth of China's Rover, the launch of Turksat 4A, the Earth does in fact revolve around the sun, 50 special Olympic gold metals and the Mars mystery rock is solved. Main topic: Bigelow wants to have the Federal Aviation Administration's Office of Commercial Space Transportation to define Lunar zone of operations. What may follow defines Lunar law. We talk about what this means and if this is the right time. Spacevidcast is a weekly show all about space and the comsos. Covering major events from NASA, ESA, JAXA, Roscosmos, SpaceX and more, Spacevidcast is your weekly news and views show for every space geek! Featuring monthly live shows and weekly cosmic updates, get your Space Geek on right here! Don't forget to subscribe.
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Daily Magazine
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Crocodiles can climb trees, study finds | The Rundown | PBS NewsHour | PBS

Crocodiles can climb trees, study finds | The Rundown | PBS NewsHour | PBS | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Despite the fact they lack the physical adaptations of a climber, crocodiles can climb trees and do it regularly, a new study in Herpetology Notes finds.

Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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Rescooped by John Purificati from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
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Free Technology for Teachers: The Science of Snow

Free Technology for Teachers: The Science of Snow | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

"Good morning from Woodstock, Maine where we have roughly ten inches of new snow on the ground. The fresh snow combined with the approaching full moon reminded me of a couple of neat videos about snow and the moon.

The episode of Bytesize Science embedded below explains how snowflakes are created."


Via John Evans
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Effective Education
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HowStuffWorks "Top 5 Unsolved Brain Mysteries"

HowStuffWorks "Top 5 Unsolved Brain Mysteries" | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Take a look at 5 brain mysteries to find out about the workings of the organ in your noggin. These 5 brain mysteries will have you scratching your head.

Via Sharrock, Lynnette Van Dyke, Evdokia Roka, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Daily Magazine
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Cancer drugs hitch a ride on 'smart' gold nanoshells

Cancer drugs hitch a ride on 'smart' gold nanoshells | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Nanoparticles capable of delivering drugs to specifically targeted cancer cells have been created by a group of researchers from China.

Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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Rescooped by John Purificati from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Google Science Fair 2014

Google Science Fair is a global online competition open to students from 13 to 18 years old. What do you want to change?

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Rescooped by John Purificati from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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caffeine in a cup of coffee, cup of tea - Use your math and WolframAlpha to find out!

caffeine in a cup of coffee, cup of tea - Use your math and WolframAlpha to find out! | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Check out these dynamically computed results from Wolfram|Alpha!

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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