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Collection of Resources for Today's Science Teachers
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NASA 'flying saucer' for Mars to land in Hawaii - space - 09 April 2014 - New Scientist

NASA 'flying saucer' for Mars to land in Hawaii - space - 09 April 2014 - New Scientist | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
The test flight will use an inflatable system designed to get heavy loads – and perhaps people – safely on the Martian surface

Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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22 Interactive Lessons to Bring Earth Day to Life

22 Interactive Lessons to Bring Earth Day to Life | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“Some great resources to bring environmental science alive in the classroom.”Learn more: - http://globaleducationandsocialmedia.wordpress.com/2014/03/22/practice-learning-about-sustainability-up-from-the-early-age-a-must/ - http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2011/12/29/for-a-better-world-test/
Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Tom Whitford, Gust MEES
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Pedagogy
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Jacobs Physics: Is there any point at all in talking in front of the class?

Jacobs Physics: Is there any point at all in talking in front of the class? | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

"In my 9th grade conceptual classes, I've done less and less talking as time's gone on.  And I've actually seen improvement in test, quiz, and homework performance..."


Via Mikko Hakala
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Mikko Hakala's curator insight, April 2, 2014 4:42 PM

Some disturbingly interesting issues in this post. What's the point of teacher talking?

 

What the teacher can do instead of lecturing:

1. Lead a brief discussion on the facts (that are given in a document to a student)

2. Lead interactive discussion on homework problems

3. Explain the answers to a daily quiz

4. Students grade each others tests. Teacher explains the rubric

5. Answer to some brief questions from students

6. When students solve problems, teacher checks every single part of their solution before they can move on

 

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First comprehensive atlas of human gene activity released

First comprehensive atlas of human gene activity released | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
A large international consortium of researchers has produced the first comprehensive, detailed map of the way genes work across the major cells and tissues of the human body. The findings describe the complex networks that govern gene activity, and the new information could play a crucial role in identifying the genes involved with disease.“Now, for the first time, we are able to pinpoint the regions of the genome that can be active in a disease and in normal activity, whether it’s in a brain cell, the skin, in blood stem cells or in hair follicles,” said Winston Hide, associate professor of bioinformatics and computational biology at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and one of the core authors of the main paper in Nature.“This is a major advance that will greatly increase our ability to understand the causes of disease across the body.”The research is outlined in a series of papers published March 27, 2014, two in the journal Nature and 16 in other scholarly journals. The work is the result of years of concerted effort among 250 experts from more than 20 countries as part of FANTOM 5 (Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome). The FANTOM project, led by the Japanese institution RIKEN, is aimed at building a complete library of human genes.Researchers studied human and mouse cells using a new technology called Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE), developed at RIKEN, to discover how 95% of all human genes are switched on and off. These “switches” — called “promoters” and “enhancers” — are the regions of DNA that manage gene activity. The researchers mapped the activity of 180,000 promoters and 44,000 enhancers across a wide range of human cell types and tissues and, in most cases, found they were linked with specific cell types.“We now have the ability to narrow down the genes involved in particular diseases based on the tissue cell or organ in which they work,” said Hide. “This new atlas points us to the exact locations to look for the key genetic variants that might map to a disease.”
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Handy Online Tools for Schools
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ScienceCast: The Opposition of Mars - YouTube

Earth and Mars are converging for a close encounter in April, an event astronomers call "the opposition of Mars."

Via Petra Pollum
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Humans will be kept between Life & Death in the first Suspended Animation Trials

Humans will be kept between Life & Death in the first Suspended Animation Trials | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
At a hospital in Pittsburgh, surgeons are now allowed to place patients into a state of suspended animation.

Via TechinBiz
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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What If You Stopped Drinking Water via AsapScience and @ViralVideos

What If You Stopped Drinking Water via AsapScience and @ViralVideos | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Every living organism required water. So what happens if you stopped drinking H2O completely?
Read more at http://www.viralviralvideos.com/2014/03/23/what-if-you-stopped-drinking-water/#M2VviR7UB4xGPU7t.99"Every living organism required water. So what happens if you stopped drinking H2O completely?
Read more at http://www.viralviralvideos.com/2014/03/23/what-if-you-stopped-drinking-water/#M2VviR7UB4xGPU7t.99"

"Every living organism required water. So what happens if you stopped drinking H2O completely?"

 

Every living organism required water. So what happens if you stopped drinking H2O completely?
Read more at http://www.viralviralvideos.com/2014/03/23/what-if-you-stopped-drinking-water/#M2VviR7UB4xGPU7t.99"

 


Via John Evans
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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Bacteria Live At 33,000 Feet | PopularScience.com

Bacteria Live At 33,000 Feet | PopularScience.com | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Earth's upper atmosphere—below freezing, nearly without oxygen, flooded by UV radiation—is no place to live. But last winter, scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology discovered that billions of bacteria actually thrive up there.
Expecting only a smattering of microorganisms, the researchers flew six miles above Earth's surface in a NASA jet plane. There, they pumped outside air through a filter to collect particles. Back on the ground, they tallied the organisms, and the count was staggering: 20 percent of what they had assumed to be just dust or other particles was alive. Earth, it seems, is surrounded by a bubble of bacteria.Scientists don't yet know what the bacteria are doing up there, but they may be essential to how the atmosphere functions, says Kostas Konstantinidis, an environmental microbiologist on the Georgia Tech team. For example, they could be responsible for recycling nutrients in the atmosphere, like they do on Earth. And similar to other particles, they could influence weather patterns by helping clouds form.However, they also may be transmitting diseases from one side of the globe to the other. The researchers found E. coli in their samples (which they think hurricanes lifted from cities), and they plan to investigate whether plagues are raining down on us. If we can find out more about the role of bacteria in the atmosphere, says Ann Womack, a microbial ecologist at the University of Oregon, scientists could even fight climate change by engineering the bacteria to break down greenhouse gases into other, less harmful compounds.Click headline to read more--

Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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NASA’s ultra-composite image shows the Moon in 850 billion pixels of detail | Science! | Geek.com

NASA’s ultra-composite image shows the Moon in 850 billion pixels of detail | Science! | Geek.com | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has returned more than 10,000 shots of the Moon, and scientists have stitched them together into a map of unprecedented detail.

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Santorini tree rings support the traditional dating of the volcanic eruption

Santorini tree rings support the traditional dating of the volcanic eruption | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Will the dating of the volcanic eruption of Santorini remain an unsolved mystery? The question whether this natural disaster occurred 3,500 or 3,600 years ago is of great historiographical importance and has indeed at times been the subject of heated discussion among experts. After investigating tree rings, scientists have concluded that the volcano erupted in the 16th century BC, rather than any earlier than that.

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The Chemical Blog — Chemical Uses, Chemistry Information and Industry News

The Chemical Blog — Chemical Uses, Chemistry Information and Industry News | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Chemical Uses, Chemistry Information and Industry News

Via KirsiEira
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Physics
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How France is disposing of its nuclear waste

How France is disposing of its nuclear waste | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Via Theo J. Mertzimekis, Mikko Hakala
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Mikko Hakala's curator insight, March 4, 2014 4:54 PM

As a follow-up, here is more information on nuclear power in Finland and plans for final disposal.

 

http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Country-Profiles/Countries-A-F/Finland/

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/4948378.stm

 

Rescooped by John Purificati from Educational technology , Erate, Broadband and Connectivity
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Digital Forensics: How Experts Uncover Doctored Images

Digital Forensics: How Experts Uncover Doctored Images | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“ Modern software has made manipulation of photographs easier to carry out and harder to uncover than ever before, but the technology also enables new methods of detecting doctored images”
Via Dennis T OConnor, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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STEM: It’s the Little Things (That Go Beep)

STEM: It’s the Little Things (That Go Beep) | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
The Commanding General of the Brigade Modernization Command, Brig. Gen. John W. Charlton, is leading by example when it comes to supporting the push of STEM to students.
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Sharks with cameras: See underwater world from their perspective

Sharks with cameras: See underwater world from their perspective | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“ Scientists have strapped cameras onto free-swimming sharks, capturing a shark’s-eye view of their underwater world.”
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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A Neutrino Walks Through A Bar, And More Science Jokes From Twitter

A Neutrino Walks Through A Bar, And More Science Jokes From Twitter | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Our Twitter followers share their favorite science jokes.

Via Mary Williams
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Mary Williams's curator insight, March 31, 2014 2:57 AM

Happy Monday! Don't you think this list is lacking in good biology jokes?

PMG's comment, March 31, 2014 7:10 PM
this is hilarious!
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Physics-minded crows bring Aesop's fable to life

Physics-minded crows bring Aesop's fable to life | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Using stones to raise water in a pitcher isn't just the stuff of fiction: experiments show that crows have an understanding of water displacement.

 

To see if New Caledonian crows could handle some of the basic principles of volume displacement, Sarah Jelbert at the University of Auckland in New Zealand and her colleagues placed scraps of meat just out of a crow's reach, floating in a series of tubes that were part-filled with water. Objects potentially useful for bringing up the water level, like stones or heavy rubber erasers, were left nearby. The crows successfully figured out that heavy and solid objects would help them get a treat faster. They also preferred to drop objects in tubes where they could access a reward more easily, picking out tubes with higher water levels and choosing tubes of water over sand-filled ones.

 

However, the crows failed at more challenging tasks that required an understanding of the effect of tube width or the ability to infer a hidden connection between two linked tubes. The crows displayed reasoning skills equivalent to an average 5 to 7 year old human child, the researchers claim. Previously, Eurasian jays have shown some understanding of water displacement, as have chimpanzees and orang-utans, but using similar experiments could assess and compare their skill levels. "Any animal capable of picking up stones could potentially participate," write the researchers.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Physics
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Scientists open a new window into quantum physics with superconductivity in LEDs

Scientists open a new window into quantum physics with superconductivity in LEDs | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
A team of University of Toronto physicists led by Alex Hayat has proposed a novel and efficient way to leverage the strange quantum physics phenomenon known as entanglement.

Via Jocelyn Stoller, Mikko Hakala
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Mikko Hakala's curator insight, March 28, 2014 1:43 AM

Put a superconductor in contact with a semiconductor LED. According to the article, when Cooper pairs are injected into LED the emitted photons are entangled. Interesting opening.

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Living Education: Re-Defining The Narrative: Minority Students and STEM/STEAM

Living Education: Re-Defining The Narrative: Minority Students and STEM/STEAM | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Living Education: Re-Defining The Narrative: Minority Students and STEM/STEAM Join host Dr. Mike Robinson, Saturday, March 22, 2014 at 10:30 am (EST) for a live Google Hangout discussion on the...

Via Lewis Walker, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Lewis Walker's curator insight, March 25, 2014 5:52 PM

This conversation is a live Google Hangout event and will be open this Saturday also.

Rescooped by John Purificati from EDUCACIÓN 3.0 - EDUCATION 3.0
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Elements 4D

Elements 4D | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“ This isn't a new resource. Drew Minock and Brad Waid (Congrats again, Brad, on getting on this year's 20 to Watch List!) have mentioned the Elements 4D Cubes several times on their website as well...”
Via Pere Cornellà Canals, Javier Sánchez Bolado
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Diagnosis by Light: How to Shrink Chemical Labs Onto Optical Fibers

Diagnosis by Light: How to Shrink Chemical Labs Onto Optical Fibers | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Lab-on-fiber sensors could monitor the environment and hunt for disease inside your body.Imagine an entire laboratory that fits inside a case the size of a tablet computer. The lab would include an instrument for reading out results and an array of attachable microsize probes for detecting molecules in a fluid sample, such as blood or saliva. Each probe could be used to diagnose one of many different diseases and health conditions and could be replaced for just a few cents.This scenario is by no means a pipe dream. The key to achieving it will be optical glass fibers—more or less the same as the ones that already span the globe, ferrying voluminous streams of data and voice traffic at unmatchable speeds. Their tiny diameter, dirt-cheap cost, and huge information-carrying capacity make these fibers ideal platforms for inexpensive, high-quality chemical sensors.We call this technology a lab on fiber. Beyond being an affordable alternative to a traditional laboratory, it could take on tasks not possible now. For instance, it could be snaked inside industrial machines to ensure product quality and test for leaks. It could monitor waterways and waste systems, survey the oceans, or warn against chemical warfare. One day, maybe as soon as a decade from now, it could be injected into humans to look for disease orstudy the metabolism of drugs inside the body.It will probably be at least five years before lab-on-fiber instruments are ready for commercial use. For example, a remaining major challenge is figuring out how to toughen the surface coating on the probes so that they can be stored for several months without becoming unstable and thereby losing their ability to bind with target molecules.Nevertheless, lab-on-fiber technology is tantalizingly close to being able to compete in cost and performance with today’s diagnostic tools for many applications. One of the first might very well be a blood test: Imagine turning on your home lab kit, pricking your finger, and blotting the blood on an array of fiber probes. In just a few minutes, the machine would automatically e-mail the results to your doctor, who could get back to you within hours if there was a problem. Meanwhile, you could get on with the rest of your day.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Educational Technology
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Learning Never Stops: 50 websites that help make learning science fun

Learning Never Stops: 50 websites that help make learning science fun | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Via Kathleen Cercone, Marco Pozzi
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Climate engineering ideas no longer considered pie in the sky

Climate engineering ideas no longer considered pie in the sky | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON — As international efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions stall, schemes to slow global warming using fantastical technologies once dismissed as a sideshow are getting serious consideration in Washington.

Via PIRatE Lab
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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, March 5, 2014 5:45 AM

More techno fixes.

Rescooped by John Purificati from Using Technology to Transform Learning
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Helping STEM Learning Take Root Outside the Classroom

Helping STEM Learning Take Root Outside the Classroom | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Helping STEM Learning Take Root Outside the Classroom
Schools are working hard to engage students in computer programming and engineering, but resources are tight. And some kids lack access to high-tech tools at home.

Via Norton Gusky
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Norton Gusky's curator insight, March 4, 2014 2:42 PM

Great examples from school and out-of-school providers in Pittsburgh and other areas. 

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, March 26, 2014 8:36 AM

this article is so true.. the kids lack access, the schools lack access and teachers trained to teach with technology and testing rules. Education as a cash cow for businesses with little benefits for those who live in places with little cash.

 

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Sharks help scientists and themselves, by wearing cameras and swallowing sensors | GizMag.com

Sharks help scientists and themselves, by wearing cameras and swallowing sensors | GizMag.com | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Perhaps you've seen footage from National Geographic's "Crittercam," an underwater video camera that has been attached to animals such as sharks and whales. Well, scientists from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa and the University of Tokyo have gone one better. Not only have they been putting cameras on sharks to see what they get up to, but they've also been slipping them ingestible sensors, to monitor their dietary habits. The data that they've gathered could help protect shark populations, and the overall health of the ocean.The video camera packages also include an accelerometer, a data-logging computer, and a VHF transmitter. They're strapped onto the pectoral fins of sharks that are caught and released by the researchers, and they then proceed to record footage from the sharks' point of view as they travel through the sea. The packs automatically release themselves from the fish after a set amount of time, at which point they float to the surface to be located and retrieved via their radio signal.The "feeder tags," on the other hand, are fed to the sharks. Once in the digestive tract, they measure electrical signals to track the ingestion and digestion of prey. Combined with the images and other data from the camera packs, they also provide a record of what animals the sharks have been eating, along with where and in what quantities.Click headline to read more and watch video clip--
Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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