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Video games, role-playing, and Rube Goldberg machines: Is this the future of ... - PandoDaily (blog)

Video games, role-playing, and Rube Goldberg machines: Is this the future of ... - PandoDaily (blog) | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Video games, role-playing, and Rube Goldberg machines: Is this the future of ...
PandoDaily (blog)
But this is the first time the public has been allowed to walk through the venue and watch the students learn and play in person.

Via Chris Carter
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Chris Carter's curator insight, May 14, 2013 1:42 AM

Rube Goldberg machines live!

John Purificati's comment, May 14, 2013 6:50 AM
Always fascinated with Rube Goldberg machines. I still have vivid recollections of some of my student's contraptions 25 years ago.
Chris Carter's comment, May 14, 2013 7:10 AM
We still build them in physics. The whole HS comes and sees what the kids have created.
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WizIQ Recordor: Create, Share Powerful Video Lectures for Flipped Classroom

WizIQ Recordor: Create, Share Powerful Video Lectures for Flipped Classroom | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

"We have launched WizIQ Recordor: an amazing lecture-recording software designed exclusively for your teaching needs. This software lets you convert your PowerPoint presentations into synchronized video lectures, publish them to WizIQ (add them to Content Library), and share them with your students right from your desktop- something which no other software has enabled you to do until now. And yes, it’s absolutely free!

"WizIQ Recordor (yes, it’s spelt with an “OR” not “ER”. No pun intended!) runs as an add-in to Microsoft  PowerPoint and works seamlessly with WizIQ. Install this add-in and a few clicks is all it takes to create an effective MP4 video lecture using your presentation. This add-in allows you to record your live audio and sync it with presentation slides."

 

Via aiba Svenca 


Via Jim Lerman, michel verstrepen
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The electric rise and fall of Nikola Tesla

The electric rise and fall of Nikola Tesla | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Combining projection mapping and a pop-up book, Marco Tempest tells the visually arresting story of Nikola Tesla -- called “the greatest geek who ever lived” -- from his triumphant invention of alternating current to his penniless last days.

Via Margarita Parra
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Margarita Parra's curator insight, December 27, 5:33 PM

Fantastica ilustración de Tesla, su mundo y su genio: "the greatest geek who ever lived".

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Khan Academy founder has two big ideas for overhauling higher education in the sciences

Khan Academy founder has two big ideas for overhauling higher education in the sciences | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Soft-spoken education revolutionary Sal Khan has a few ideas for how to radically overhaul higher education. First, create a universal degree that's comparable to a Stanford degree, and second, tra...
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Technology in Today's Classroom
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Add Wow to Your Science Lesson Plans with These Five Teaching Tools | Gynzy Teachers

Add Wow to Your Science Lesson Plans with These Five Teaching Tools | Gynzy Teachers | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Science is the subject where your students can (literally) get their hands dirty. It's one of the most interactive subjects you can teach, mostly because

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , John Purificati
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Carbon Emissions and Warming: First Direct Mathematical Link Identified

Carbon Emissions and Warming: First Direct Mathematical Link Identified | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Most climatologists, ecologists, and even the World Bank have all reached a consensus that climate change is occurring. Experts and policymakers alike have attributed rising concentrations of carbon dioxide to net warming, but finding straightforward evidence of this can be difficult. Now, a team of researchers claims that they have identified, for the first time, how global warming is related to the amount of carbon emitted in a mathematical proof.

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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, December 3, 6:19 AM

Yet another series of robust facts and rigorous science telling us what we knew 40 years ago.  Climate Change is real.  How embarrassing this is "newsworthy."

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The world's largest solar power plant is now up and running

The world's largest solar power plant is now up and running | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Solar power just hit one of its biggest milestones, in more ways than one. First Solar recently finished building Topaz, a 550-megawatt plant that represents the largest active solar farm on the planet. 


Via Official AndreasCY
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Seaborgium Hexacarbonyl Sg(CO)6: First Carbonyl Complex of a Superheavy Element

Seaborgium Hexacarbonyl Sg(CO)6: First Carbonyl Complex of a Superheavy Element | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Atoms with the same number of protons belong to the same element. Atomic nuclei with the same number of protons and different numbers of neutrons are called isotopes. The elements up to uranium (element 92) exist in nature (except for technetium ). The elements heavier than uranium are man-made. All elements are arranged in the periodic table of the elements. Their positions in the periodic table correspond to their proton number; elements in the same column (i.e., in the same group) feature similar and electronic shell structure, which characterizes the chemical behavior of an element. An element's position in the periodic table and thus provides information on its chemical behavior, e.g., as a metal or an inert gas.If atomic nuclei have too many protons (all of which repel each other) or have an this ratio is unfavorable proton to neutron ratio, the nuclei are not stable but undergo radioactive decay. The elements up to the element fermium (which has atomic number 100) can be produced at research reactors by irradiating a target of a heavy element with neutrons. The target atoms capture a neutrons and subsequently decay through β--emission, thus forming an element with the next higher proton number. This process can be repated, up to fermium.As there are no isotopes of fermium which decay through β--emission, no elements with higher proton number can be synthesized by this method.The heavier an atom is, the more protons are contained in its nucleus. With increasing proton number, the repulsive force of these protons will eventually lead to immediate disintegration of the nucleus. The elements with a proton number higher than 103 can only exist due to nuclear shell effects and are called the superheavy elements. A topic of intense research concerns the question of the heaviest possible element. To date, all elements up to element 112 as well as elements 114 and 116 are officially recognized as discovered, and reports about the observation also of element 113,115, 117, and 118 are also published. It is currently not clear, which element is the heaviest one that can exist.The production of 265Sg and its separation in GARIS was perfected in preparatory work led by Dr. Hiromitsu Haba from RIKEN Nishina Center (RNC) and his team. In this nuclear reaction, a few Sg atoms per hour can be produced.Seaborgium hexacarbonyl – Why is it so special?Carbon monoxide (CO) is known to form complexes with many transition metals. In 1890, Ludwig Mond, Carl Langer and Friedrich Quincke reported of the first synthesis of a carbonyl complex – nickeltetracarbonyl ( Ni(CO)4; see here). In this compound, the nickel (Ni) atom is surrounded by 4 carbon monoxide molecules (CO).In this type of molecule, coordination bonds (rather than covalent bonds) form between the metal and the carbon monoxide.The carbon monoxide ligands bind to the metal by forming a so-called σ-donation bond, and a π-backbond from the metal to the carbon monoxide ligand establishes. In the σ-donation bond the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the CO donates electron density into the σ-symmetric orbitals of the metal (s or p1/2 or dz2 orbitals). In the π-backbonding, electron density for the π-symmetric d-orbital is donated to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the CO-ligand. The σ-donation bond is the strongest bond, while the π-backbond is slightly weaker.Synthesis of carbonyl complexes with fusion products directly behind the target in a CO-containing atomosphere is not possible, as the primary beam would pass the gas and create a plasma. This would destroy the CO molecules. Therefore, only our new approach to perform chemical experiments behind a separator like TASCA or GARIS allows the synthesis and study of this compound class.Chemistry experiments with superheavy elements - with periodic numbers higher than 104 – are difficult to perform. First, scientists have to produce the element artificially in a particle accelerator. The production rates are really low, usually lower than a few atoms per day. Furthermore, these atoms are very instable, and survive in the best case less than 10 seconds. However, science is still very interested to investigate the characteristics of these superheavy elements, since they allow to test the influence of Einstein's relativity theory on chemistry. The high number of positively charged protons in the atomic nucleus of superheavy elements accelerate the electrons in the different shells to extremely high velocities - close to 80% of the speed of light. Due to the relativistic effects at these speeds, electrons are much heavier than when they are at rest, which in turn should have some influence on the chemical properties of the superheavy atom. These effects will be compared with elements that possess a similar atomic structure but are lighter. Such studies will be of enormous interest to all basic chemists in the world.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Free Technology for Teachers: How Do Things Fly? - A Fun and Interactive STEM Activity

Free Technology for Teachers: How Do Things Fly? - A Fun and Interactive STEM Activity | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Via Margarita Parra
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Margarita Parra's curator insight, October 27, 4:53 PM

Excelente sugerencia para una divertida actividad, llena de aprendizajes potenciales.

Rescooped by John Purificati from Technology to Teach
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Ten Websites for Science Teachers

Ten Websites for Science Teachers | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Blogger Eric Brunsell takes us on a tour of his favorite online resources for science teachers.

Via Amy Burns
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Amy Burns's curator insight, October 14, 6:41 AM

Updated list of sites for science teachers.

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The Human Brain (HD full documentary) - YouTube

The Human Brain (HD full documentary) Using simple analogies, real-life case studies, and state-of-the-art CGI, this special shows how the brain works, expla...
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3 Useful Resources for Science Activities and Lesson Plans

3 Useful Resources for Science Activities and Lesson Plans | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
September 18, 2014
Today's post features two practical resources for science teachers. These are websites that  provide a wide variety of science activities and presentations that you can try...

Via Dean J. Fusto
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Physicists find a new way to push electrons around

Physicists find a new way to push electrons around | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Discovery might ultimately lead to new, more energy-efficient transistors and microchips.”When moving through a conductive material in an electric field, electrons tend to follow the path of least resistance — which runs in the direction of that field.But now physicists at MIT and the University of Manchester have found an unexpectedly different behavior under very specialized conditions — one that might lead to new types of transistors and electronic circuits that could prove highly energy-efficient.They’ve found that when a sheet of graphene — a two-dimensional array of pure carbon — is placed atop another two-dimensional material, electrons instead move sideways, perpendicular to the electric field. This happens even without the influence of a magnetic field — the only other known way of inducing such a sideways flow.What’s more, two separate streams of electrons would flow in opposite directions, both crosswise to the field, canceling out each other’s electrical charge to produce a “neutral, chargeless current,” explains Leonid Levitov, an MIT professor of physics and a senior author of a paper describing these findings this week in the journal Science.The exact angle of this current relative to the electric field can be precisely controlled, Levitov says. He compares it to a sailboat sailing perpendicular to the wind, its angle of motion controlled by adjusting the position of the sail.Levitov and co-author Andre Geim at Manchester say this flow could be altered by applying a minute voltage on the gate, allowing the material to function as a transistor. Currents in these materials, being neutral, might not waste much of their energy as heat, as occurs in conventional semiconductors — potentially making the new materials a more efficient basis for computer chips.“It is widely believed that new, unconventional approaches to information processing are key for the future of hardware,” Levitov says. “This belief has been the driving force behind a number of important recent developments, in particular spintronics” — in which the spin of electrons, not their electric charge, carries information.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Sample Popsicle Catapult for STEM Class

Sample Popsicle Catapult for STEM Class | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Half of my 4th and 5th grade STEM students (those not working in a center in our "Maker Studio") are 2 days into a 4 day unit on creating popsicle catapults, which my district STEM mentor and peer ...

Via Skip Zalneraitis
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Arthur C Clarke - Fractals - The Colors Of Infinity - YouTube

Arthur C. Clarke presents this unusual documentary on the mathematical discovery of the Mandelbrot Set (M-Set) in the visually spectacular world of fractal g...

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Margarita Parra's curator insight, December 27, 5:43 PM

Una joya! No se lo pierdan.

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▶ Is it Better to Walk or Run in the Rain? - YouTube

Subscribe to MinutePhysics - it's FREE! http://dft.ba/-minutephysics_sub For recent scientific publications on the walk/rain question: http://iopscience.iop....

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Why Birds Exist Without Teeth

Why Birds Exist Without Teeth | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Birds do not have teeth, just like turtles, baleen whales, and anteaters. However, this situation did not always exist. According to a new study, birds were known to have teeth about 116 million ye...
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A Media Specialist's Guide to the Internet: 31 Free iPad Apps for Science Teachers

A Media Specialist's Guide to the Internet: 31 Free iPad Apps for Science Teachers | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Via Skip Zalneraitis, Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby, Petra Pollum
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Karen E Smith's curator insight, December 3, 8:47 AM

Literacy teachers in the content area of science can benefit from this list.

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, December 3, 10:52 PM

Thx Skip

Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, December 25, 10:07 PM

Free? Yes! Check them out!

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The last unmapped places on Earth

The last unmapped places on Earth | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Have we mapped the whole planet? As Rachel Nuwer discovers, there are mysterious, poorly charted places everywhere, but not for the reasons you might think.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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BioDigital Human - 3D anatomy views on iOS

BioDigital Human - 3D anatomy views on iOS | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
BioDigital Human (free with in-app purchases) is an astounding 3D map of the human body, all rendered in real time so you can explore, zoom and rotate anat

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Fact or Fiction?: Mammoths Can Be Brought Back from Extinction

Fact or Fiction?: Mammoths Can Be Brought Back from Extinction | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

In a petri dish in the bowels of Harvard Medical School scientists have tweaked three genes from the cells of an Asian elephant that help control the production of hemoglobin, the protein in blood that carries oxygen. Their goal is to make these genes more like those of an animal that last walked the planet thousands of years ago: the woolly mammoth.

"Asian elephants are closer to mammoths than either is to African elephants, yet quite different in appearance and temperature range," notes Harvard geneticist and technology developer George Church. "We are not trying to make an exact copy of a mammoth, but rather a cold-resistant elephant."
 
But what if the new—and fast advancing—techniques of genome editing allowed scientists to engineer not only cold-resistance traits but also other characteristics of the woolly mammoth into its living Asiatic relatives? Scientists have found mammoth cells preserved in permafrost. If they were to recover cells with intact DNA, they could theoretically “edit” an Asian elephant’s genome to match the woolly mammoth’s. A single cell contains the complete genetic instruction set for its species, and by replicating that via editing a new individual can, theoretically, be created. But wouldsuch a hybrid—scion of an Asian elephant mother and genetic tinkerers—count as a true woolly mammoth?
 
In other words, is de-extinction a real possibility?
 
The answer is yes. On January 6, 2000, a falling tree killed the last bucardo, a wild Iberian ibex, which is a goatlike animal. Her name was Celia. On July 30, 2003, Celia's clone was born. To make the clone scientists removed the nucleus of a cell from Celia intact and inserted it into the unfertilized egg cell of another kind of ibex. They then transferred the resulting embryo to the womb of a living goat. Nearly a year later theydelivered the clone by cutting her from her mother.
 
Although she lived for a scant seven minutes due to lung defects, Celia’s clone proved that not only is de-extinction real, "it has already happened," in the words of environmentalist Stewart Brand, whose San Francisco-based Long Now Foundation is funding some of this de-extinction research, including Church's effort as well as bids to bring back the passenger pigeon and heath hen, among other candidate species. Nor is the bucardo alone in the annals of de-extinction. Several viruses have already been brought back, including the flu variant responsible for the 1918 pandemic that killed more than 20 million people worldwide.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Top 60 iPad Apps for Teaching STEAM Organized by Grade Level ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Top 60 iPad Apps for Teaching STEAM Organized by Grade Level ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

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The Best iPad Apps in Art Education | Listly List

The Best iPad Apps in Art Education | Listly List | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
What iPad Apps are most useful for student learning and engagement? We have listed our top apps that promote CREATIVITY and ORIGINALITY. Please help rank the most useful, leave a comment, and add to this list of the BEST apps for art education! | Dropbox, ArtRage, iMovie, Percolator, Amaziograph, iMotion HD, SketchBook Express, Paper by FiftyThree, Evernote, and Keynote

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Dean J. Fusto
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LORENAMEJIA's curator insight, September 19, 3:25 PM

agregar su visión ...

Barbara Monica Pérez Moo's curator insight, September 19, 3:29 PM

Los diseñadores gráficos, diseñadores digitales, seguro son expertos en esto.

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Soylent: Food of the future?

Watch as we unveil what may be the food of the future – Soylent - and learn about its nutritional implications. Watch more videos: http://www.ndtv.com/video?yt.

Via Pekka Puhakka, TechinBiz, Frank J. Klein
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Future of Learning
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How to Get Students to Work Harder

How to Get Students to Work Harder | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Some kids have an understandable worry that they don't belong in school. According to new research, changing this belief can help turn low-achievers into motivated students.

Via Terese Bird
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