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Perfecting interactive tables for the classrooms of tomorrow - Science Omega

Perfecting interactive tables for the classrooms of tomorrow - Science Omega | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
There are still issues that must be ‘ironed out’ before educators can make full use of digital tabletops, according to classroom-based study
John Purificati's insight:

The best is yet to come.

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John Purificati's curator insight, May 11, 2013 8:41 AM

Can't wait for the kinks to get "ironed out". Can't imagine that these tables won't captivate and inspire our students.

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Rescooped by John Purificati from STEM Connections
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Lycopodium powder, aka 'dragon's breath,' makes water do wacky things

Lycopodium powder, aka 'dragon's breath,' makes water do wacky things | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
These spores, also known as lycopodium powder, allow you to stick your hand in water and come out completely dry. They are also highly flammable, hello Puff The Magic Dragon!

Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*, Skylly_W, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*'s curator insight, September 7, 8:32 AM

This is lycopodium powder. It's the spores of club moss and it has amazing properties.

PIRatE Lab's curator insight, September 8, 12:44 PM
One of my most favorite water-related lab activity: Lycopodium lets you put your hand underwater without getting wet.
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Artificial Human Heart May Just Be Possible Thanks to This Silicon Stingray

Artificial Human Heart May Just Be Possible Thanks to This Silicon Stingray | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Bioengineering professor Kevin Kit Parker has created a robotic stingray imbued with live heart cells that have been programmed to respond to light, allowing them to steer the stingray bot in different directions. The big thing about this is that it can lead to a massive range of applications including the creator's ultimate goal: creating a living, pumping artificial heart.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Part 2: STEM, STEAM, Makers: Over 40 Amazing STEM Resources

Part 2: STEM, STEAM, Makers: Over 40 Amazing STEM Resources | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Best content around Program Evaluation Advocacy selected by the EdTech Update community.
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Space Internet Technology Debuts on the International Space Station

Space Internet Technology Debuts on the International Space Station | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
In a major step toward creating a Solar System Internet, NASA debuts operational service of a Delay / Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN) service on the International Space Station.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Space Debris 1957 2015

“ Almost 20,000 pieces of space debris are currently orbiting the Earth. This visualisation, created by Dr Stuart Grey, lecturer at University College Londo”
Via Luciana Viter
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ESA: Take a narrated 3D tour of the International Space Station from your desk | Michael Franco | GizMag.com

ESA: Take a narrated 3D tour of the International Space Station from your desk | Michael Franco | GizMag.com | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Even though the International Space Station (ISS) has been in orbit around our planet since 1998, and has lapped our world 100,000 times, it's only held a total of 230 people in its tube-shaped pods. That means the rest of us have to find other ways to look inside the orbiting home and lab.

The European Space Agency (ESA) has just obliged by making available an online video that takes you on a narrated tour of the ISS. Even better, it's in 3D.

Click headline to read more and access hot links--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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SpaceX undecided on payload for first Falcon Heavy flight | Spaceflight Now

SpaceX undecided on payload for first Falcon Heavy flight | Spaceflight Now | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

As SpaceX engineers put together the first model of the company’s new Falcon Heavy rocket, officials have not ruled out flying a paying customer’s satellite aboard the maiden flight of the humongous launcher scheduled later this year, the company’s president told Spaceflight Now.The long-awaited Falcon Heavy rocket could blast off on its first flight as soon as November from launch pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, returning the storied Apollo- and shuttle-era launch complex to service for the first time since the last space shuttle mission took off in 2011.


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Nasa finding confirms Indian theory: Black holes are 'ultra hot balls of fire' - Firstpost

Nasa finding confirms Indian theory: Black holes are 'ultra hot balls of fire' - Firstpost | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Recent observation by Nasa scientists of giant flares of X-rays from a black hole confirms theory that the black holes ultra hot balls of fire like our Sun.

It came as a surprise when Nasa announced last month that two of its space telescopes caught a huge burst of X-ray spewing out of a super massive black hole.

What is unique about this giant flare is it appeared to be triggered by the eruption of a massive corona (charged particles) from the "black hole". If nothing can get out of a black hole, how did the corona come out of it?

Abhas Mitra, till recently head of theoretical astrophysics at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) in Mumbai and currently Adjunct Professor at the Homi Bhabha National Institute says Nasa's observation has only bolstered his theory that "true" black holes do not exist and that the so-called black holes are in fact hot balls of magnetized plasma...


Via Sepp Hasslberger
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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, May 2, 11:44 AM

Here goes another one of conventional physics' holy cows, the black hole... they are just supermassive, and super-fast rotating, stellar objects.

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Just 40 light years from Earth, three planets might host life forms adapted to infrared worlds

Just 40 light years from Earth, three planets might host life forms adapted to infrared worlds | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“Is there life beyond our solar system? If there is, our best bet for finding it may lie in three nearby, Earth-like exoplanets.”

For the first time, an international team of astronomers from MIT, the University of Liège in Belgium, and elsewhere have detected three planets orbiting an ultracool dwarf star, just 40 light years from Earth. The sizes and temperatures of these worlds are comparable to those of Earth and Venus, and are the best targets found so far for the search for life outside the solar system. The results are published today in the journal Nature.

The scientists discovered the planets using TRAPPIST (TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope), a 60-centimeter telescope operated by the University of Liège, based in Chile. TRAPPIST is designed to focus on 60 nearby dwarf stars—very small, cool stars that are so faint they are invisible to optical telescopes. Belgian scientists designed TRAPPIST to monitor dwarf stars at infrared wavelengths and search for planets around them.

The team focused the telescope on the ultracool dwarf star, 2MASS J23062928-0502285, now known as TRAPPIST-1, a Jupiter-sized star that is one-eighth the size of our sun and significantly cooler. Over several months starting in September 2015, the scientists observed the star's infrared signal fade slightly at regular intervals, suggesting that several objects were passing in front of the star.

With further observations, the team confirmed the objects were indeed planets, with similar sizes to Earth and Venus. The two innermost planets orbit the star in 1.5 and 2.4 days, though they receive only four and two times the amount of radiation, respectively, as the Earth receives from the sun. The third planet may orbit the star in anywhere from four to 73 days, and may receive even less radiation than Earth. Given their size and proximity to their ultracool star, all three planets may have regions with temperatures well below 400 kelvins, within a range that is suitable for sustaining liquid water and life.

Because the system is just 40 light years from Earth, co-author Julien de Wit, a postdoc in the Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, says scientists will soon be able to study the planets' atmospheric compositions, as well as assess their habitability and whether life actually exists within this planetary system.


Via Mariaschnee, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Having fraternal twins is in your genes—and in your hormones

Having fraternal twins is in your genes—and in your hormones | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“Two gene variants increase the chance of fraternal twins by 29%”
Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*'s curator insight, April 28, 5:30 PM

Researchers have uncovered two of the genes that lead to fraternal twins:

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12 Inspiring Women In Data Science, Big Data - InformationWeek

12 Inspiring Women In Data Science, Big Data   - InformationWeek | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Women make up half the population, yet it's been well documented that they don't come close to parity in STEM fields. Could the rise of big data and data science offer women a clearer path to success in technology?
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Congo's rain forests under logging threat

Congo's rain forests under logging threat | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Democratic Republic of Congo may allow new industrial loggers into environmentally critical region of the continent.
Via Garry Rogers, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Garry Rogers's curator insight, March 15, 8:40 PM
No forest is safe for long.
pdeppisch's curator insight, March 15, 8:59 PM
No forest is safe for long.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, April 4, 7:29 PM
No forest is safe for long.
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It pays to work in STEM: Seattle had the highest annual wage growth in the country - GeekWire

It pays to work in STEM: Seattle had the highest annual wage growth in the country - GeekWire | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“ Seattle's thriving tech industry is driving a population boom, attracting large numbers of transplants to its fast-growing job market. A new report from Pa”
Via Ted Feller, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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The First Few Moments That Physics Can't Explain from ...

The First Few Moments That Physics Can't Explain from ... | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

A tiny fraction of a second after the Big Bang, something triggered cosmic inflation. We still don't know what.


Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*, Stephania Savva, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*'s curator insight, July 9, 10:49 AM

Not the Big Bang, but close.

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Scaffolded Math and Science: High School Math Word Wall Ideas

Scaffolded Math and Science: High School Math Word Wall Ideas | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
OK, he was right: When in Boston, I taught next to a Geometry teacher who would later go on to become Teacher of the Year. Lining the walls of his high school Geometry classroom, from floor to ceiling, were vocabulary words with drawings and examples. At the time I thought it was a bit extreme. I mean, aren't these kids in high school?
Via Cindy Riley Klages, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, July 12, 3:59 PM
We have effectively used word walls in elementary schools for years and there is no reason they cannot be effective in the secondary schools. 
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Part 1: STEM, STEAM, Makers: Connecting Project Based Learning (PBL)

Part 1: STEM, STEAM, Makers: Connecting Project Based Learning (PBL) | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Welcome to a series that brings STEM, STEAM, and Maker Space together with Project Based Learning and proper technology integration in the classroom. You will discover around one hundred resources in this series along with some great ideas for finding student success.  Before reading, please take a moment to subscribe by email or RSS and also give me a…
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PlantNet : The App That Identifies Plants From A Picture

PlantNet : The App That Identifies Plants From A Picture | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“GeeksNewsLab is a Technology based Website which deliver articles in the area of Mobile, Augmented Reality(AR), Virtual Reality(VR), Internet of Things(IOT),3D Printer”
Via TechinBiz
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Stormtroopers Meet REAL Lasers!

“ To celebrate Star Wars Day, we brought members of the Empire to FABberz NYC to see how they would fare against a real working laser. May the 4th be wit”
Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Engineers create a better way to boil water—with industrial, electronics applications

Engineers create a better way to boil water—with industrial, electronics applications | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“Engineers at Oregon State University have found a new way to induce and control boiling bubble formation, that may allow everything from industrial-sized boilers to advanced electronics to work better and last longer.”
Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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The Shrinking Mitochondrion Phenomenom

The Shrinking Mitochondrion Phenomenom | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“Scanning the mitochondrial genomes of thousands of species is beginning to shed light on why some genes were lost while others were retained.”

Billions of years ago, one cell—the ancestral cell of modern eukaryotes—engulfed another, a microbe that gave rise to today’s mitochondria. Over evolutionary history, the relationship between our cells and these squatters has become a close one; mitochondria provide us with energy and enjoy protection from the outside environment in return. As a result of this interdependence, our mitochondria, which once possessed their own complete genome, have lost most of their genes: while the microbe that was engulfed so many years ago is estimated to have contained thousands of genes, humans have just 13 remaining genes in their mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA).

Some mitochondrial genes have disappeared completely; others have been transferred to our cells’ nuclei for safekeeping, away from the chemically harsh environment of the mitochondrion. This is akin to storing books in a nice, dry, central library, instead of a leaky shed where they could get damaged. In humans, damage to mitochondrial genes can result in devastating genetic diseases, so why keep any books at all in the leaky shed?

Researchers have proposed diverse hypotheses to explain mitochondrial gene retention. Perhaps the products of some genes are hard to introduce into the mitochondrion once they’ve been made elsewhere. (Mitochondria have their own ribosomes and are capable of translating their retained genes in-house.) Or perhaps keeping some mitochondrial genes allows the cell to control each organelle individually. Historically, it has been hard to gather quantitative support for any of these ideas, but in the world of big (and growing) biological data we now have the power to shed light on this question. The mtDNA sequences of thousands of organisms as diverse as plants, worms, yeasts, protists, and humans have now been sequenced, yielding information on the patterns of gene loss and on the gene properties that may have governed this loss.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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A Virtual Reality game that's good for you and Scientist Approved

A Virtual Reality game that's good for you and Scientist Approved | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“It's fitting that the morning I first experienced Deep VR at the Tribeca Film Festival, billed by its creators as a meditative virtual reality experience,”
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Falcon 9 rocket wins landmark U.S. Air Force launch contract | Spaceflight Now

Falcon 9 rocket wins landmark U.S. Air Force launch contract | Spaceflight Now | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket will launch a third-generation GPS navigation satellite for the U.S. military in 2018, the Air Force said Wednesday, breaking a monopoly held by United Launch Alliance since its formation nearly a decade ago.

The second satellite in the Air Force’s GPS 3 series, GPS 3-2, will launch aboard a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral in May 2018.

The Air Force’s announcement came hours after SpaceX unveiled a plan to send the first commercial mission to Mars in 2018, when it hopes to send an uncrewed “Red Dragon” capsule to land there.


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What Happens When You Combine Artificial Intelligence and Satellite Imagery

What Happens When You Combine Artificial Intelligence and Satellite Imagery | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“ AI and machine learning is turning the data into an omnipresent source of business intelligence.”
Via geoinformacao, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Promising lab-grown skin sprouts hair and grows glands - BBC News

Promising lab-grown skin sprouts hair and grows glands - BBC News | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“ Scientists create artificial skin, made from mouse stem cells, that integrates successfully and even sprouts hairs when transplanted into another mouse.”
Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, April 1, 5:42 PM
Artificial Skin created by scientists