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Rescooped by John Purificati from Technology in Today's Classroom
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Google Visualizes Massive Changes To The Face Of The Earth With New Timelapse Project | TechCrunch

Google Visualizes Massive Changes To The Face Of The Earth With New Timelapse Project | TechCrunch | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
A lot can change in 28 years, and Google has put together a very graphic demonstration of just how much can happen geographically with a new effort that combines global, annual Landsat satellite image composites with its Google Earth Engine software.
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Classroom activities: Assessment and Technology
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Climate Change | GIS for Climate Research & Global Warming


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F9R First Flight Test | 250m | YouTube

Video of Falcon 9 Reusable (F9R) taking its first test flight at our rocket development facility. F9R lifts off from a launch mount to a height of approximately 250m, hovers and then returns for landing just next to the launch stand. Early flights of F9R will take off with legs fixed in the down position. However, we will soon be transitioning to liftoff with legs stowed against the side of the rocket and then extending them just before landing. The F9R testing program is the next step towards reusability following completion of the Grasshopper program last year (Grasshopper can be seen in the background of this video). Future testing, including that in New Mexico, will be conducted using the first stage of a F9R as shown here, which is essentially a Falcon 9 v1.1 first stage with legs. F9R test flights in New Mexico will allow us to test at higher altitudes than we are permitted for at our test site in Texas, to do more with unpowered guidance and to prove out landing cases that are more-flight like.
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Discovery Vision Concept Live Reveal (Full Film) | Land Rover USA | YouTube

The Discovery Vision Concept was revealed April 14, 2014 in New York City. From 2015 onwards, the Discovery nameplate will be a distinct range of vehicles that symbolize the essence of the premium SUV: modern, versatile, practical and desirable, with the unmistakable DNA of Land Rover at its core.

Join the conversation at www.Facebook.com/LandRoverUSA or on Twitter and Instagram @LandRoverUSA with #ReadyToDiscover

 


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Stratocumulus's curator insight, April 16, 8:53 PM


More about the SUV than the SpaceShip but still some pretty amazing video.

Rescooped by John Purificati from eLanguages
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Project Based Learning: Explained. - YouTube

The Buck Institute for Education commissioned the cutting-edge advertising agency, Common Craft, to create a short animated video that explains in clear lang...

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Rescooped by John Purificati from Amazing Science
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Begin of a Tetrad of Lunar Eclipses Tonight, April 15th, 2014

The lunar eclipses of 2014 are the first of four consecutive total lunar eclipses - a series known as a tetrad. During the 5000-year period from -1999 to +3000, there are 4378 penumbral eclipses (36.3%), 4207 partial lunar eclipses (34.9%) and 3479 total lunar eclipses (28.8%). Approximately 16.3% (568) of all total eclipses belong to one of the 142 tetrads occurring over this period (Espenak and Meeus, 2009). The mechanism causing tetrads involves the eccentricity of Earth's orbit in conjunction with the timing of eclipse seasons (Meeus, 2004).During the present millennium, the first eclipse of every tetrad occurs sometime from February to July. In later millennia, the first eclipse date gradually falls later in the year because of precession.Italian astronomer Giovanni Schiaparelli first pointed out that the frequency of tetrads is variable over time. He noticed that tetrads were relatively plentiful during one 300-year interval, while none occurred during the next 300 years. For example, there are no tetrads from 1582 to 1908, but 17 tetrads occur during the following 2 and 1/2 centuries from 1909 to 2156. The ~565-year period of the tetrad "seasons" is tied to the slowly decreasing eccentricity of Earth's orbit. Consequently, the tetrad period is gradually decreasing (Meeus, 2004). In the distant future when Earth's eccentricity is 0, tetrads will no longer be possible.The umbral magnitudes of the total eclipses making up a tetrad are all relatively small. For the 300-year period 1901 to 2200, the largest umbral magnitude of a tetrad eclipse is 1.4251 on 1949 Apr 13. For comparison, some other total eclipses during this period are much deeper. Two examples are the total eclipses of 2000 Jul 16 and 2029 Jun 26 with umbral magnitudes of 1.7684 and 1.8436, respectively.More info here: http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/OH/OH2014.html
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Amazing Science
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World's rarest primate faces extinction

World's rarest primate faces extinction | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“Rescue bid launched to save Hainan gibbon from becoming first ape driven to extinction by humans.”China’s wildlife conservation efforts are under scrutiny as scientists battle to save a species found only in a tiny corner of an island in the South China Sea. The Hainan gibbon is the world’s rarest primate and its long-term survival is in jeopardy, according to an analysis.Only 23 to 25 of the animals are thought to remain, clustered in less than 20 square kilometers of forest in China’s Hainan Island. The species (Nomascus hainanus), which numbered more than 2,000 in the late 1950s, has been devastated through the destruction of habitat from logging, and by poaching. Extinction would give the gibbon the unwelcome distinction of being the first ape to be wiped out because of human actions. To hammer out a plan to save it, international primate researchers convened an emergency summit in Hainan last month.“With the right conservation management, it is still possible to conserve and recover the Hainan gibbon population,” says meeting co-chair Samuel Turvey, who studies animal extinctions at the Zoological Society of London (ZSL). “But given the current highly perilous state of the species, we cannot afford to wait any longer before initiating a more proactive and coordinated recovery programme.” He adds that the meeting was a successful first step towards saving the animal and that a plan of action is being finalized.The plan will be based in part on a ‘population viability analysis’ that models the potential size of the gibbon population in coming decades for a range of different scenarios. It is being drawn up by Kathy Traylor Holzer, a conservation planner at the Conservation Breeding Specialist Group in Apple Valley, Minnesota. “It’s one of the smallest populations I’ve ever worked with,” says Traylor Holzer. “That number — in one place — is extremely scary.”
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Scientists Discover Evidence of a New Type of Matter: the Tetraquark

Scientists Discover Evidence of a New Type of Matter: the Tetraquark | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“The recent identification of a long-theorized particle is strong evidence of a new form of matter: the Tetraquark.”With the existence of tetraquarks, it is possible for neutrons within the core to interact strongly enough to create tetraquarks. This could even lead to the production of pentaquarks and hexaquarks, or even that quarks could interact individually without being bound into color neutral particles. This would produce a hypothetical object known as a quark star.
Via Gust MEES
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Rescooped by John Purificati from K-12 Web Resources - Science
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ScienceDump | Espresso for the Mind

ScienceDump | Espresso for the Mind | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“ Science Dump is a source for interesting science design art videos and photos. We would like to bring back the cool, passion and fun in Science.”
Via Ken Peterson
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Rescooped by John Purificati from DIGI-TOOLS - The Intersection of Tech Integration, Innovation, and Instruction
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How iPad Apps Are Accelerating Learning in One Astronomy Classroom

“ Students in Nasif Iskander’s astronomy class at San Francisco University High School (UHS) retrace humanity's relationship with the cosmos from stone-age astronomers to the latest discoveries of extrasolar planets.”
Via Dean J. Fusto
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STEM: It’s the Little Things (That Go Beep)

STEM: It’s the Little Things (That Go Beep) | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
The Commanding General of the Brigade Modernization Command, Brig. Gen. John W. Charlton, is leading by example when it comes to supporting the push of STEM to students.
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Coastal Restoration
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Sharks with cameras: See underwater world from their perspective

Sharks with cameras: See underwater world from their perspective | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“ Scientists have strapped cameras onto free-swimming sharks, capturing a shark’s-eye view of their underwater world.”
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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A Neutrino Walks Through A Bar, And More Science Jokes From Twitter

A Neutrino Walks Through A Bar, And More Science Jokes From Twitter | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Our Twitter followers share their favorite science jokes.

Via Mary Williams
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Mary Williams's curator insight, March 31, 2:57 AM

Happy Monday! Don't you think this list is lacking in good biology jokes?

PMG's comment, March 31, 7:10 PM
this is hilarious!
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Physics-minded crows bring Aesop's fable to life

Physics-minded crows bring Aesop's fable to life | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

Using stones to raise water in a pitcher isn't just the stuff of fiction: experiments show that crows have an understanding of water displacement.

 

To see if New Caledonian crows could handle some of the basic principles of volume displacement, Sarah Jelbert at the University of Auckland in New Zealand and her colleagues placed scraps of meat just out of a crow's reach, floating in a series of tubes that were part-filled with water. Objects potentially useful for bringing up the water level, like stones or heavy rubber erasers, were left nearby. The crows successfully figured out that heavy and solid objects would help them get a treat faster. They also preferred to drop objects in tubes where they could access a reward more easily, picking out tubes with higher water levels and choosing tubes of water over sand-filled ones.

 

However, the crows failed at more challenging tasks that required an understanding of the effect of tube width or the ability to infer a hidden connection between two linked tubes. The crows displayed reasoning skills equivalent to an average 5 to 7 year old human child, the researchers claim. Previously, Eurasian jays have shown some understanding of water displacement, as have chimpanzees and orang-utans, but using similar experiments could assess and compare their skill levels. "Any animal capable of picking up stones could potentially participate," write the researchers.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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15 Terrific Science Apps and Games

15 Terrific Science Apps and Games | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
For this week's Top Picks List Friday, we are featuring science apps and games. From physics puzzlers to outdoor apps, you'll find terrific products that encourage students to observe the plants, animals, and habitats around them. Many of these great picks have extension activities and...
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Web Tools and Resources for Learning and Working
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Google Science Fair - Science Project or Next Dimension to Technology!

Google Science Fair - Science Project or Next Dimension to Technology! | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“ Google Science Fair is a global online competition open to individuals or teams from 13 to 18 years old. What do you want to change?”
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12 NASA Apps for Students to Learn about Space ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

12 NASA Apps for Students to Learn about Space ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Physics
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Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Brookhaven National Laboratory

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Brookhaven National Laboratory | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Brookhaven National Laboratory

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Mikko Hakala's curator insight, April 15, 1:54 AM

From Maglev via one of the first video games and insulin to Higgs. Interesting information.

 

Others articles in this series: http://energy.gov/joules-wisdom-top-things-you-didnt-know-about-energy

 

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Exotic space particles slam into buried South Pole detector

Exotic space particles slam into buried South Pole detector | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
A below-ground experiment at the South Pole has now discovered three of the highest-energy neutrinos ever found, particles that may be created in the most violent explosions of the universe. These neutrinos all have energies at the absurdly high scale of petaelectronvolts — roughly the energy equivalent of one million times a proton’s mass. (As Albert Einstein showed in his famous E = mc2 equation, energy and mass are equivalent, and such a large amount of mass converts to an extreme level of energy.) The experiment, called IceCube, reported the discovery of the first two — nicknamed Ernie and Bert — last year, and announced the third Monday here at the American Physical Society meeting. “Internally, it’s known as Big Bird,” said IceCube physicist Chris Weaver of the University of Wisconsin–Madison.These neutrinos are valuable because they are extremely standoffish, rarely ever interacting with other particles, and are uncharged, so their direction is never swayed by magnetic fields in the universe. Thus, their trajectories should point straight back to their source, which astronomers think could be a variety of intense events such as humongous black holes accreting matter, explosions called gamma-ray bursts or galaxies forming stars at furious rates.This penchant for noninteraction also makes neutrinos extremely difficult to detect. The IceCube experiment looks for the very rare occasions when neutrinos collide with atoms in a cubic kilometer of ice buried underneath the South Pole. Such shielding is necessary to filter out collisions from other particles, but does not inhibit neutrinos. The experiment capitalizes on the naturally pure ice there, using a region that extends twice the depth of the Grand Canyon underground.Thousands of light detectors are imbedded in the ice to catch the little blips of light created when neutrinos are caught. Such interactions are so infrequent that IceCube researchers had to search for two years to find these three high-energy neutrinos. During that time span the instrument also detected 34 neutrinos of somewhat lower energies. Some of these neutrinos are thought to be contamination created when charged particles called cosmic rays hit Earth’s atmosphere, but some portion of IceCube’s haul likely came directly from violent processes in the cosmos. Those particles are called astrophysical neutrinos. “It looks like we have reached compelling evidence for astrophysical neutrinos,” said U.W.–Madison physicist Albrecht Karle, a member of the IceCube team.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Coastal Restoration
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SeaWorld loses appeal in death by killer whale

“ WASHINGTON (AP) â€" A federal appeals court on Friday upheld a regulatory safety finding against SeaWorld in the drowning of a trainer who was pulled under by a killer whale at the theme park. SeaWorld remains committed to providing a safe workplace for employees, healthy environments for the animals in our care, and inspirational and educational experiences with killer whales for our guests. The general duty clause of the Occupational Safety and Health Act requires employers to furnish a place of employment free from recognized hazards that are likely to cause death or serious physical harm. Kavanaugh said the bureaucracy at the Labor Department has not traditionally been thought of as the proper body to decide "whether to ban fighting in hockey, to prohibit the punt return in football, to regulate the distance between the mound and home plate in baseball, to separate the lions from the tamers at the circus, or the like."”
Via PIRatE Lab
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New technique takes cues from astronomy and ophthalmology to sharpen microscope images

New technique takes cues from astronomy and ophthalmology to sharpen microscope images | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
The complexity of biology can befuddle even the most sophisticated light microscopes. Biological samples bend light in unpredictable ways, returning difficult-to-interpret information to the microscope and distorting the resulting image.
Via José Gonçalves
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Daily Magazine
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Using X-Rays To Peer Inside Ancient Art Objects

Using X-Rays To Peer Inside Ancient Art Objects | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“Photographer David Maisel—widely known for his incredible aerial work, including a breath-taking project recently shot in Spain—has opened a new show in New York exploring the otherwise invisible insides of culturally important art objects. Called History's Shadow, it is on display at the Yancey Richardson Gallery until May 10, 2014.”
Via Official AndreasCY
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Daily Magazine
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NASA 'flying saucer' for Mars to land in Hawaii - space - 09 April 2014 - New Scientist

NASA 'flying saucer' for Mars to land in Hawaii - space - 09 April 2014 - New Scientist | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
The test flight will use an inflatable system designed to get heavy loads – and perhaps people – safely on the Martian surface

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Rescooped by John Purificati from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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22 Interactive Lessons to Bring Earth Day to Life

22 Interactive Lessons to Bring Earth Day to Life | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
“Some great resources to bring environmental science alive in the classroom.”Learn more: - http://globaleducationandsocialmedia.wordpress.com/2014/03/22/practice-learning-about-sustainability-up-from-the-early-age-a-must/ - http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2011/12/29/for-a-better-world-test/
Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Tom Whitford, Gust MEES
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Rescooped by John Purificati from Pedagogy
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Jacobs Physics: Is there any point at all in talking in front of the class?

Jacobs Physics: Is there any point at all in talking in front of the class? | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it

"In my 9th grade conceptual classes, I've done less and less talking as time's gone on.  And I've actually seen improvement in test, quiz, and homework performance..."


Via Mikko Hakala
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Mikko Hakala's curator insight, April 2, 4:42 PM

Some disturbingly interesting issues in this post. What's the point of teacher talking?

 

What the teacher can do instead of lecturing:

1. Lead a brief discussion on the facts (that are given in a document to a student)

2. Lead interactive discussion on homework problems

3. Explain the answers to a daily quiz

4. Students grade each others tests. Teacher explains the rubric

5. Answer to some brief questions from students

6. When students solve problems, teacher checks every single part of their solution before they can move on

 

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First comprehensive atlas of human gene activity released

First comprehensive atlas of human gene activity released | iScience Teacher | Scoop.it
A large international consortium of researchers has produced the first comprehensive, detailed map of the way genes work across the major cells and tissues of the human body. The findings describe the complex networks that govern gene activity, and the new information could play a crucial role in identifying the genes involved with disease.“Now, for the first time, we are able to pinpoint the regions of the genome that can be active in a disease and in normal activity, whether it’s in a brain cell, the skin, in blood stem cells or in hair follicles,” said Winston Hide, associate professor of bioinformatics and computational biology at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and one of the core authors of the main paper in Nature.“This is a major advance that will greatly increase our ability to understand the causes of disease across the body.”The research is outlined in a series of papers published March 27, 2014, two in the journal Nature and 16 in other scholarly journals. The work is the result of years of concerted effort among 250 experts from more than 20 countries as part of FANTOM 5 (Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome). The FANTOM project, led by the Japanese institution RIKEN, is aimed at building a complete library of human genes.Researchers studied human and mouse cells using a new technology called Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE), developed at RIKEN, to discover how 95% of all human genes are switched on and off. These “switches” — called “promoters” and “enhancers” — are the regions of DNA that manage gene activity. The researchers mapped the activity of 180,000 promoters and 44,000 enhancers across a wide range of human cell types and tissues and, in most cases, found they were linked with specific cell types.“We now have the ability to narrow down the genes involved in particular diseases based on the tissue cell or organ in which they work,” said Hide. “This new atlas points us to the exact locations to look for the key genetic variants that might map to a disease.”
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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