Is the internet making social interactions taboo?
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You need to go meet people, not add people.

You need to go meet people, not add people. | Is the internet making social interactions taboo? | Scoop.it
Kyle Johnson's insight:

After 6 long months of a grueling, relatively secluded warehouse job, i have made more lasting friendships than i have ever made from an online site.  There are people i actually look forward to talking to at work, and i could careless if someone talks to me online.  The idea that someone can walk into a room full of people, and just sit in a corner and play on a phone is absurd.  

 

It's a little harder being someone who witnessed the actual change over and lived during the teen years when all this was going on.  It was just sort of normal.  I didn't join social media sites to fit in or be cool, i did it because i had friends i didn't see all the time.  However when we both had spare time, we didn't sit around and message each other, we went and did something.  Knowing today that kids younger than 10 have facebooks and have hundreds of friends is just plan weird.  First off, i don't even know a hundred people that i would actually call my friend.  I have a very tight group of friends, only consisting of about 5, and we have been friends since elementary school.  I have no need for the approval of others to make me feel good about myself.

 

One of the most disgusting things i've been finding more of lately is people not knowing how to play simple games or sports.  I have been to numorous family events of my own or with friends where people want to play sofball or something.  I understand having to explain some rules to the very young kids, but kids that are 15+ not knowing? Thats sickening.  When i was younger, everyone i knew either played baseball, softball, or soccer.  It was just normal to see.  Now, the only thing you hear of kids doing is tweeting, or playing video games.  

 

Personally, i'm a fan of the internet and technology.  I play numerous games online and talk to people i've never met on those games.  Do i consider those people to be my actualy friends? No. They're aquaintances and thats all.  Once i'm done with my game, i go out and do something with my actualy, physical friends.  

 

This idea of kids not being able to talk to anyone or make friends is just odd.  All i did when i was little was try to make new friends and meet people.  Now its about beating the next level, or having a "trending tweet."  This problem needs to be solved somehow or its going to get so out of hand that people are afraid to go outside.  

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Erik Marshall's comment, June 11, 2013 1:21 PM
True. It sounds like you are arguing for a sort of balance between online and in-person relationships, leaning a little more towards the latter. Nice range of articles.
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Technology can have positive or negative impact on social interactions

Technology can have positive or negative impact on social interactions | Is the internet making social interactions taboo? | Scoop.it
Many people are involved in an abundant number of relationships through technology, but sometimes the quantity of these associations leaves people feeling qualitatively empty.
Kyle Johnson's insight:

Having a ton a friends on facebook may be cool and make you seem popular, but how many of them do you actually talk to on a daily basis? Better yet, how many of them have you met or even seen?  The internet puts such a stress on being the most popular or sought after person anymore, with showing popular searches, or just recommending "attractive" people as friends.  Does having tons of friends on facebook really make you popular in your real life?  I remember a comedian once saying something to the effect of, the more friends you have online, the less you have in real life. Which i feel is very relevent and true.  The more your online, the less your out spending time getting to actually know someone.

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Social websites harm children's brains: Chilling warning to parents from top neuroscientist

Social websites harm children's brains: Chilling warning to parents from top neuroscientist | Is the internet making social interactions taboo? | Scoop.it
Social networking websites such as Facebook and Twitter are causing alarming changes in the brains of young users, an eminent scientist has warned.
Kyle Johnson's insight:

A common theme among scientific studies is how technology, more intensly the internet, is changing the minds of the younger generations.  I constantly see posts or funny pictures about kids saying, "where's the Wi-Fi?" or "what do you mean go outside?".  I'm only nineteen and i don't even remember a time when i didn't go outside.  I wasn't allowed to stay indoors on a nice summer day, my parents would just turn the power off inside.  This source of entertainment may be great fun, but it ruins the attention spans as well.  Games nowadays have so much going on at one time, you don't focus on one thing for more than a minute.  And that translates to the real world.  Parents always are claiming that their child or children have ADHD, and some do i'm not saying it doesn't exist.  However most of the time its that they are allowed to sit and play video games or on the computer for hours on end and drinking gallons of pop  Not only does technology and the internet harm the youth's minds, it destroys their "real-life" confidence.  Try finding a kid who can just go up to someone and introduce themselves.  Even someone in their early teens would probably be extremely nervous and not know what to say.  

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Is Social Networking Actually Hurting Your "Real World" Social Life?

Is Social Networking Actually Hurting Your "Real World" Social Life? | Is the internet making social interactions taboo? | Scoop.it
The Archbishop of Westminster, Vincent Nichols, head of the Roman Catholic Church in England, claims that "transient relationships" on sites like Facebook and MySpace are detrimental to teenagers and society in general.
Kyle Johnson's insight:

Social media sites are a great way for people to stay in contact after school or when someone moves away.  But for others, the internet is the only way they communicate with people.  Some people cannot even talk to others in public simply because they don't know how, but they could sure type a long message to someone.  There's something to be said about being able to look someone in the eye when talking to them, or a nice firm hand shake.  But over the internet, all you can get are the sideways "smiley faces" and exclamation points.

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Is Social Interaction on the Internet a Good Idea?

Is Social Interaction on the Internet a Good Idea? | Is the internet making social interactions taboo? | Scoop.it
A personal, one-on-one interaction has definitely taken a back seat when it comes to social interaction. More and more people are getting hooked on to socially interacting with friends and family t...
Kyle Johnson's insight:

A large factor i feel as to why people use social media sites instead of in person is the security feeling.  Your not going to be directly harmed just talking to someone online.  Now if you give them your address or pictures, you're on your own.  Also is the idea that you don't have to go anywhere, you don't have to worry about what you smell like, how you look, nothing.  People are going to talk just the same as if you wore a suit and tie or were in your pajamas.  This however affects the real world too.  Aside from actually being able to talk to someone, people feel getting dressed up for occasions isn't important.  They feel that they can just go  wherever they want dressed however and it's okay.  

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Is the Internet hurting children?

Is the Internet hurting children? | Is the internet making social interactions taboo? | Scoop.it
Chelsea Clinton and James P. Steyer say the explosion in online access for children and teenagers has created privacy concerns and cognitive development issues.
Kyle Johnson's insight:

The fact that kids spend on average more time looking at a screen than talking to a human being is sort of appauling.  Kids have a great idea of how cool the internet is and all the fun they can have with it, but they never look for the downsides.  When people post pictures of themselves or send them to a friend, it only takes seconds for someone to copy or download that image. Now you have no control over who sees it, or where it goes.  That can come back to haunt them even later when trying to get into college or getting a job.  

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Benefits of Online Social Networking | ParentFurther

Benefits of Online Social Networking | ParentFurther | Is the internet making social interactions taboo? | Scoop.it
Kyle Johnson's insight:

We cannot rule out the use of the internet. Homework assignments are given online, even as low as grade school.  Teachers can give online help sessions, video tutorials, and you can get help immediately.  A perk of talking to someone before you meet them is you get a sense of who they are.  There isn't such an awkward stigma between the people meeting.  Yes it can be easy for people to only want to talk online, you can reinvent yourself, but you can't have a truely meaningful relationship online.

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