Is the Internet creating a global mindset?
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Is the Internet creating a global mindset?
The idea to progress, in some direction, may not be at the heart of every creative endeavor, but it is the general purpose, and considering our adolescence concerning Internet usage, that which has been accomplished is rather encouraging. Yet, because of our cyber-adolescence (and because of the tether to the issues of the real world), there is evidently much more to overcome. The major concept of the joint-work Anti-Oedipus is the concept of “a body without organs” which, applied here, signifies the Internet as our virtual adjunct, free from governing organs to simply proliferate, and by extension, through this process of chaos, to reform the global consciousness from “the very thing that dominates and exploits us," as stated by Foucault in the book’s introduction. The body without organs, according to Deleuze and Guattari, can only be the horizon, not the goal, so as to maintain the inspiration. The Internet is human’s current horizon for such an endeavor, and thus the utility of rejoining the species in a way never before seen has arguably become linked to our aesthetic and cultural growth. The duality of independence and globalization is the key to maintaining this inspiration while progressing, and thus it is necessary to begin analyzing how we are virtually affecting the literal future.
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Internet Helps Liberate, Create Music in China : NPR

Internet Helps Liberate, Create Music in China : NPR | Is the Internet creating a global mindset? | Scoop.it
For many Chinese, the Web isn't merely a tool to help circumvent political censorship. Some Chinese musicians are exploiting online tools and sites to create new economic models for the music business.
Daniel Heater's insight:

(12/12) Piracy can even be freedom from repression; China's entrance online followed the musical black market, and now they have Neocha, a collective of independent Chinese musicians promoting and supporting each other. It's a good time to note that this is one of the multiple situations in which people circumnavigated social barriers to progress, sometimes with/out Internet; the amorphous manifest. It's pretty incredible an independent musician in China can live off electronica, and it also is a reminder of how many other bands, established or otherwise, are figuring out how to survive similarly, and collaborate internationally. Oh, right, global participation, pooling resources, sounds like we're full-circle.

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Moral Development in the Information Age

Moral Development in the Information Age | Is the Internet creating a global mindset? | Scoop.it
Daniel Heater's insight:

(10/12) This sort of backs up a few aforesaid details, such as Internet providing means to even the score politically and expanding cognitive function to better understand everything else, but there are two other interesting points. The essay claims the Internet is classical anarchy because it can be managed by its users, acting (for the most part) in accord with "netiquette." Also, as more generations grow with the Internet, they learn how to process a new framework of ethics, which leads further from opportunity for political control. Just as morality is practically "universalizable," Internet ethics can promote internal empathy, which influences further empathy offline. Of course there are many cases that suggest otherwise, but we are still in Internet infancy; the spread of maturation will come to pass.

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Springtime for Twitter

Springtime for Twitter | Is the Internet creating a global mindset? | Scoop.it
Daniel Heater's insight:

(8/12)...Especially with this inevitable example. Without the help of Twitter and Anonymous - that is to say, inter-continental aid via the web - the Arab Spring may not have "succeeded," if we can even use that word in hindsight. However, access to these sources indirectly led citizens to become politicized. But the article also mentions the double-edged sword of the Internet-as-tool: it can be used just as easily to repress. Thankfully, there is other technology, such as radio or phone communication, so the online tools aren't meant to be crutches, but rather catalysts. The article also cites human-rights lawyer Michael Posner that governments should use surveillance as a means to know what the actual problems are within the system. Novelty.

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New Media Knowledge - Foreign markets open up online opportunities for brands and businesses seeking profits overseas

New Media Knowledge - Foreign markets open up online opportunities for brands and businesses seeking profits overseas | Is the Internet creating a global mindset? | Scoop.it
New Media Knowledge (NMK) is a learning and business information resource for digital interactive media in the UK
Daniel Heater's insight:

(6/12) Quick recap: more cultures than ever before are online or coming online, disparity is dwindling, and there are several movements towards bridging the language gap. Therefore, foreign markets are able to find potential business internationally, with e-commerce wealth growing in countries like Australia and Japan (particularly to the notice of fashion trades) as well as a foretelling of growth throughout the rest of the Orient. Because Internet usage is growing rapidly in these countries, the business done in these countries will inevitably grow, not to mention provide business of their own. The Internet is becoming a giant global bazaar. The top 5 countries predicted to rapidly grow - India, Brazil, China, Russia, and Italy - are listed due to major increases in Internet usage and apparent willingness to either invest or be invested in. Also, thanks to the long-tail theory, the cost of enterprise is significantly lower, and thus more appealing.

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Breaking Down Language Barriers

Breaking Down Language Barriers | Is the Internet creating a global mindset? | Scoop.it
Viki, a Singapore-based Internet start-up and one of 12 finalists in The Wall Street Journal's Asian Innovation Awards, is challenging that assumption.
Daniel Heater's insight:

(4/12) Amazingly, despite the online world being predominantly English-speaking, English subs/dubs are still a "niche-market." However, Viki, a new video-hosting service from Singapore, has the intent to translate television and film into 160 languages. The creator of Viki, Razmig Hovaghimian, says that "right now, there's a wedge between fans and the content. I want to remove that wedge because the content is trapped there." Interestingly, Viki was initially funded by Joichi Ito (Twitter investor) and Reid Hoffman (LinkedIn chairman), and then received even more from BBC and SK Telecom Co. Obviously the opportunity now for, not only familiar but, foreign content to be widely available (and translated, what with all these investments) is reaching a pinnacle. The most interesting thing though, in my opinion, is how this can be used as an educational benefit for those learning other languages to view, say, English content in Swedish subtitles, which is currently impossible (and [maddeningly] illegal to download according to my Comcast warnings).

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New Internet domains break language barriers

New Internet domains break language barriers | Is the Internet creating a global mindset? | Scoop.it
Half of the people online don't use Latin characters. Now they can visit Web addresses in their own alphabets
Daniel Heater's insight:

(2/12) Arabic and Russian characters are now available to use for domain names, the first major update to the system since the 80s. This gives more voice to people less familiar with Latin characters, with 11 more languages requesting the same treatment. Just from Egypt alone, there is an estimate of at least 40 million more users who will be active on the Internet because of this, and taken with the additions from Russia, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates, it's clear that the voices of these countries' citizens will be greatly enlarged, and, again coming from authoritarian background, will most likely enhance understanding of surrounding cultures/views/other cognitive functions.

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Breaking News, Analysis, Politics, Blogs, News Photos, Video, Tech Reviews - TIME.com

Breaking News, Analysis, Politics, Blogs, News Photos, Video, Tech Reviews - TIME.com | Is the Internet creating a global mindset? | Scoop.it
Greg Kot, the author of Ripped: How the Wired Generation Revolutionized Music, talks to TIME about the demise of the music industry, whether illegal file-sharing is really that bad and why nobody may ever again be as big as the Beatles...
Daniel Heater's insight:

(11/12) Like any other anarchic utopia, art plays a vital role, and concerning how the Internet has affected art, it's still rather up in the air as to how the artists will fare for the long term. However, worries of piracy aren't new; radios gave timely notices of when they would play full albums so you could tape them, and according to this interview, "taping is killing music" ca 1980s. Greg Kot, music critic, also brings up a point I've been hammering for years, that "you have people who listen to a sample, like it, and buy it. Just because a listener downloads a piece of music doesn't mean the industry has a lost sale." Bands from around the world are getting universal fans directly through this "pseudo-piracy," thus we're back to the point of foreign markets, though here the actual presentation of the product has more options than ever before, via community reproduction, implementing more --interactive--meaning to a product. The Internet has become the medium for staging because of this interactive progression and direct-artist purchase.

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Why US Extradition Requests for Snowden are Ignored

As Edward Snowden flees from the United States, he's found sympathetic governments around the world to assist in his flight to asylum. China, Russia, Cuba, a...
Daniel Heater's insight:

(9/12) ...And yet in the United States, moving backwards seems to be the inclination. We see that the country has essentially spied on the entire planet, and yet anyone else who does this for the sake of public welfare is a traitor and a terrorist. The notable thing here though is that it is through the unchecked abuses on the Internet by the US government that other countries are basically superceding their "rank," as it were. Someone's shoelaces are untied. 

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Capitalism and democracy not compatible on the Internet, author says | News Bureau | University of Illinois

Capitalism and democracy not compatible on the Internet, author says | News Bureau | University of Illinois | Is the Internet creating a global mindset? | Scoop.it
The News Bureau, part of Public Affairs, generates and coordinates news coverage of the Urbana-Champaign campus
Daniel Heater's insight:

(7/12) The second snug in the rug: the woes of business. The online world was inherently public space, but because of our capitalist society, everything has, as McChesney puts it succinctly, "been commercialized, copyrighted, patented, privatized, data-inspected, and monopolized." He forgot to mention invaded as well. Thus, it's no surprise that the major online companies are looking merely for the payoff, contrary to those with much less means looking to provide quality content. This is interesting considering capitalism is the Internet economy, regardless of which country you reside, but also because it seems that, financially, there's more cement between the cracks; otherwise said, the Internet's future directly affects the economic future of every country involved. McChesney states there is a need for state of reform/revolution, which has been ongoing for some time now...

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Ortsbo: Breaking The Language Barrier | GeekDad | Wired.com

Ortsbo: Breaking The Language Barrier | GeekDad | Wired.com | Is the Internet creating a global mindset? | Scoop.it
Ortsbo is setting out to change the face of communications with real time text to text and voice to text translations.
Daniel Heater's insight:

(5/12) And, to round up the language section, it seems that talking of global communication would..inevitably..lead to KISS. Stanley and Simmons, two partners and investors of the new company Ortsbo, have said "what this is really about is trying to increase the experience of the fans...It is more than music, it is culture," and that "the smaller you can make the world, the more you make it a global village and the better off we all are." Ortsboro is yet another translation service, but utilizing mobile apps, social media tools, and real-time subtitling, intended for use between businesses across the globe, making international transactions much more "fluent" (pun intended?). KISS are utilizing the real-time translations of their shows, as well as Indycar racers, who held a live interview using this service, able to receive and reply to foreign submissions. After language, what barriers are left online?

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Will web users join forces to break the online language barrier?

Will web users join forces to break the online language barrier? | Is the Internet creating a global mindset? | Scoop.it
A new Wikipedia-style project will rely on users to upload translations of blogs and newspaper articles
Daniel Heater's insight:

(3/12) The Worldwide Lexicon project, begun in 2009, has a goal of translating any blog/newspaper that uses its software into at least 15 languages (and by now has probably increased). This is important because 1) not everyone can properly express themselves in English, 2) English words don't have the same connotations as, for example, Arabic or Japanese expressions, which would limit further capabilities, and 3) the faster a community can understand something, the faster a community can respond/make the next move. Luckily for this project, the inherent transparency - much like Wikipedia - provides a platform for volunteer translations (which are thankfully abundant) as well as "quality control" to track/ban disrespectful users and replace them with trusted [paid] translators to avoid libel. Since the translations are ratable and receptive to critique, there is a better chance for success.

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Voiskounsky.pdf

Daniel Heater's insight:

(1/12) One of the most important points of this essay is that there are diverse cultures with diverse traditions online, yet they all find their way into this current Internet mode of tradition. Because many areas with authoritarian backgrounds are joining cyberspace, cognitive suppression is also diminishing, thus bringing more and more global citizens to similar levels of reasoning. Minorities, sexual or ethnic, also are brought to the same level of vocality since there is far less opportunity for prejudice. These two factors, in tandem, imply a duality of parity and variety. However, the article also posits a worry of losing lingual/emotional diversity because of the non-tone of the Internet and because of Latin-based domain names. 

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