Is Technology Driving Us Apart?
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Is Technology Driving Us Apart?

Is Technology Driving Us Apart? | Is Technology Driving Us Apart? | Scoop.it
Loren's insight:

The picture above can describe the social relationships of many people. Even though you can be sitting right next to someone, you can still be by yourself because you are so intrigued in your phone, iPad, tablet, etc. Technology has become a modern, easier, and quicker way to communicate with others. However, has it replaced the way humans used to communicate with each other? Before the iPhone 5, laptop computers, and even email, face-to-face interaction was prime. While communicating through text and email, you don’t get to experience the true emotion of human interaction.


Some may agree that collaborating together online can be very faster than trying to find a place and time for everyone to meet. In Lehrer’s article, a study by Isaac Kohane showed that the scientists who communicated in person had higher quality papers. This is not to say that technology cannot be helpful when working with other people, but working together in person can be more effective. “Attached to Technology and Paying a Price” displayed how people can consume so much time into technology it can affect them psychologically and hinder family life. Trying to do more than one task at once can increase your chances to be distracted and the studies done by Stanford in this article “show multitasking’s lingering effects: “The scary part for guys like Kord is, they can’t shut off their multitasking tendencies when they’re not multitasking.” It is as though our society has become addicted and socially dependent on technology, and there is even concern for our children.


With technology becoming increasing elaborate, who is to say that our children will not fall into the same obsession with technology. In “The Social Impact of ‘Everywhere’ Technology”, Hartwell states that even though technology such as video games can help with coordination skills, they would still want to be entertained by a video game, thus making them “less capable of seeing or comprehending the world around them”. Using you phone to view the world instead of your own two eyes proves how big of a distraction technology can be.


In “Dangerous distraction” I learned that “cell phone users are more likely to drift out of their lanes and miss their exits than people having in-person conversations”…. “Last year, Americans sent more than 600 billion text messages—10 times the number they sent three years ago. And 41 percent of us have logged onto the Internet outside our homes or offices, either with a wireless laptop connection or a handheld device, finds a 2007 Pew Internet Project survey” (Novontney). Technology has become an easy route to access our Twitter, Facebook, email, etc., but people do not seem to realize that they are putting themselves in danger when they focus their attention on their phones instead of the road. The article states “One such study, published in Human Factors (Vol. 48, No. 2), suggests that a driver talking on a cell phone is more impaired than one with a blood alcohol level exceeding 0.08” (Novontney). Seriously people, put down the phone and focus on driving! You can save the lives of others as well as your own. From a personal account, thanks to focusing all of his attention on his phone instead of the road, Mathew Honan almost got into an accident. In addition, his experiment showed the numerous amount of social and location apps, such as Flickr, Picasa, Whrill, and FriendFeed, which I did not find surprising, however, Honan’s experiment reiterates my point: with the vast amount of apps and programs that technology provides for people to communicate and work, people are seeming to forget how to truly communicate with each other. While you are updating your Twitter or Facebook account every two minutes, or trying to work on multiple projects for work all at once, don’t forget the world that is beyond the computer screen. Go out, meet up with friends, have fun outside, have a drink, and try not to text the dinner table!

 

Image Source: http://www.zcorum.com/the-wonderful-world-of-technology/

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Erik Marshall's comment, June 11, 2013 1:31 PM
Great response! I practically live on the internet, but I really enjoy face-to-face interactions. I try to put away my phone when I'm out with friends, and i encourage them to do the same, but it's not always easy on either end. I'm old enough to remember a time when we didn't have all this tech in our pockets, as are many of my friends, so maybe it's different. We need to be more conscious of the choices we make re technology.
Michelle Norg's curator insight, May 20, 2015 6:40 AM

Just put the phones away and talk to each other! 

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I Am Here: One Man's Experiment With the Location-Aware Lifestyle

I Am Here: One Man's Experiment With the Location-Aware Lifestyle | Is Technology Driving Us Apart? | Scoop.it
Get product reviews and news about digital cameras, computers, laptops, mp3 players, iPod, PDAs, phones, PCs, Macs and wireless from Wired.com
Loren's insight:

Mathew Honan experiments with IPhone apps that can let other people know his exact location. In doing so, he realized that even though he was letting his friends know his location, constantly updating his location on Twitter and various location apps, he was lonely. Honan was too obsessed with using his phone to let everyone know where he was that he was not really enjoying nor paying attention of where he was at the excat moment. 

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Can Online Social Networks Replace Real Socializing? | Wired Science | Wired.com

Can Online Social Networks Replace Real Socializing? | Wired Science | Wired.com | Is Technology Driving Us Apart? | Scoop.it
My latest WSJ Head Case column is on the intrinsic limitations (at least given current technology) of online interaction: Google+, the new social networ
Loren's insight:

Author Johan Lehrer questions whether social media and technology, such as Google+, can mimic realk life interactions. Such developments as the telephone and email, in his view, can not live up to real human interaction. The "inefficiencies of offline interaction" as he states are neccssary becuase  technology can not completely take the place of in person interaction. 

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The Social Impact of ‘Everywhere’ Technology - Certification Magazine

The Social Impact of ‘Everywhere’ Technology - Certification Magazine | Is Technology Driving Us Apart? | Scoop.it
As technology continues to infiltrate our lives, experts debate its ramifications on human interactions.

Via jean lievens
Loren's insight:

Margolis discusses instances in which people move toward techonlogy to communicate with each other rather than actually talking to each other face-to-face. Technology can serve as a barrier between personal relationships. There is concern for children who are being born in a world filled with technolgy and whether or not they will become ostracized from reality. Some say, as the article states, that the internet can become an addiction and that people need to develop self discipline when it comes to how much they really use technology to communicate. 

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Dangerous distraction

Dangerous distraction | Is Technology Driving Us Apart? | Scoop.it
Psychologists' research shows how cell phones, iPods and other technologies make us more accident prone and is laying the foundation to make using these gadgets less dangerous.
Loren's insight:

Technology such as iPods and cells phones can make a person become oblivious to thier surroundings, which can lead to dire consequences. For example, Christy Kirkwood was hit and killed by a person driving while on a cell phone. In Los Angeles, "25 people died and 113 were injured" when to trains crashed into each other. How did this happen? It was presumed that texting was a key factor in this accident. In an experiment with 29 students, it was found that the students who were listening to questions for them to decide if they found it to be true or false, their "-related brain activity—the spatial processing that takes place in the parietal lobe— [reduced] by almost 40 percent." 

There are new technologies being developed to help increase road saftey, such as a device developed at the University of Michigan's Transportation Research Institute that "prevents the driver from receiving phone calls or entering an address into a navigation system when conditions get dangerous." Laws in D.C. for example prohibit drivers from using hand held phones, however, researchers and psychologists say that hands free cell phone usage can be just as dangerous. 

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Your Brain on Computers - Attached to Technology and Paying a Price - NYTimes.com

Your Brain on Computers - Attached to Technology and Paying a Price - NYTimes.com | Is Technology Driving Us Apart? | Scoop.it
Scientists say our ability to focus is being undermined by bursts of information from e-mail and other interruptions.
Loren's insight:

Technology can put our brains into overdrive, resulting in stress and forgetfulness. In addition to multitasking, you can actually perform worse at task and lead to dire consequences as well, like in Mr. Campbell's case when he lost money for his company due to theoverwhelming amount of information on this three computer monitors. Being so wrapped up in technolgy can also have an affect on your children and researchers speculate if technology creates attention problems for children. Multitasking can have positive affects, but as well negative- it can distract you from your priorites. 

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The Flight From Conversation

The Flight From Conversation | Is Technology Driving Us Apart? | Scoop.it
We use technology to keep one another at distances we can control: not too close, not too far, just right: the Goldilocks effect.
Loren's insight:

Technology, such as our cell phones, is a way for people to be together alone meaning, a person can be with their friend, however the both of them are too busy texting or checking Facebook that they do not actually engage in converstation. It seems as though technology for people can serve as a void of communication, blocking other people out of your world so you can enjoy what you want to do. 

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