Is Private Really Private?
7 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Nicolas Maxwell Carter
Scoop.it!

Online privacy fears are real

Online privacy fears are real | Is Private Really Private? | Scoop.it
The Net’s threat to personal privacy can’t be dismissed as mere paranoia. There are a lot more people tracking you than you think. “We as consumers don’t have any knowledge of what really goes on out there,” one privacy advocate says. By Bob Sullivan.
Nicolas Maxwell Carter's insight:

Most people would consider privacy as something they have a right to own. I would not disagree at all, yet some large companies or e-commerce websites do not seem to have the same belief. There is rising tension between consumers and providers, especially companies that do great deals of business on the web. This problem is scary for people like me; my interest and my future career is centered around computers, and this is an issue that I will certainly have to face. The internet was created with anonymity in mind, and when someone is typing away on a chat or clicking on links, they feel safe. There is little doubt that anyone will ever be able to see what they are doing in private, after all, that is the point in privacy. This source states the growing fear; people are beginning to realize that everything they do can be tracked. The credibility of this source is difficult to argue against. E-commerce sites and large firms are the main culprits for breaching peoples private lives. NBC news does not sell things or have any need to store a person's credit card information on file. Finally, their purpose is to report on current events and get feedback. In a recent poll provided by Public Policy Polling, only 2% of Americans considered NBC untrustworthy.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicolas Maxwell Carter
Scoop.it!

When Google closes the Nest deal, privacy issues for the internet of things will hit the big time

When Google closes the Nest deal, privacy issues for the internet of things will hit the big time | Is Private Really Private? | Scoop.it
Google intends to buy a connected thermostat that knows when you’re home and where you are within it. Given Google’s quest to index all the world’s information, this deal should jumpstart the conversation about privacy and the internet of things.
Nicolas Maxwell Carter's insight:

Google is a huge collection of data, but as huge as it is, it is not going to stop growing. Now, Google intends to buy a thermostat that will know when a person is home or if they are gone. There will be other features as well, but the issue is quite obvious. Why does Google need to know this? Well, the answer that could easily be given by Google is that it is in search of the world's information, and this would benefit them in that endeavor. This impacts so many people, and even though Google is making obvious steps towards being transparent, it is also being very alarming by trying so hard to integrate everything together. Gigaom is a large collection of current news and current events mostly affiliated with technology. It is in their interest to report on topics like this and also get feedback on what average people think. Gigaom's credibility lies in the fact that they are such a large source of information for a big community of people; its articles are mostly facts that occur followed by opinions sparked from the facts. They have nothing to gain from breaches in privacy. They do not report on news based on people, their information is based on current events, and then people willingly give their opinions back to Gigaom.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicolas Maxwell Carter
Scoop.it!

Online privacy is dead

Online privacy is dead | Is Private Really Private? | Scoop.it
It's getting harder to remain faceless online. Even far-out measures of data encryption are under attack.
Nicolas Maxwell Carter's insight:

No longer do people have the option to autonomous on the internet; every action can be monitored. The U.S. government has proven its ability to break through any password or encrypted email. Jose Pagliery states that there are two opposing sides: the freeware developers fighting for privacy, and then there are a dozen U.S. agencies supported by billions of dollars. Mr. Pagliery's words seem a little more frightening considering this was published by CNN. Yes, CNN is a center for news, and therefor there might be incentive to exaggerate, but this article is littered with facts and sources regarding the NSA and PRISM (the governments massive collection of data).  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicolas Maxwell Carter
Scoop.it!

State Laws Related to Internet Privacy

State Laws Related to Internet Privacy | Is Private Really Private? | Scoop.it
Selected state actions to relating to Internet or online privacy.
Nicolas Maxwell Carter's insight:

Though the public fears for its privacy when using the internet, there is not complete clarity on what exactly there is to be afraid of. Even among the 'computer people', technologically thrifty people that society deems experts on anything computer related, do not know everything about internet privacy. The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) has laid out some current laws that already deal with internet privacy. Reading and knowing what is being done to combat attacks on privacy can give a better understanding on what there is to be cautious of; understanding the defense can provide clarity on the offense. In this case spammers and hackers are on the offense. NCSL can easily be considered trustworthy because if anything, they are apart of the defense. NCSL is a group of state legislatures that fight to keep states strong and independent.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicolas Maxwell Carter
Scoop.it!

Naked and Afraid

Naked and Afraid | Is Private Really Private? | Scoop.it
Nicolas Maxwell Carter's insight:

When faced with the scary truth about the lack of privacy and security on the internet, someone might feel very naked and quite afraid. This graphic was provided from an article (link at the bottom of blog) addressing the exposure of the NSA spying on the public with the help of big internet companies; it portrays a very brutal picture. In the graphic, Google and face book are targeted specifically. People of all ages and preferences thrive on social media. This is especially true for most technical people; social media allows us to incorporate a social life and technology. The scary side of social media is knowing that nothing is hidden, and anything that an individual does can be documented and passed on for many to see. Facebook sees your likes and messages, and Google tracks your searches, and then from there other sources, such as the NSA, can monitor almost anyone. Though the source is a website that advocates conspiracy theories, that makes it no less credible than a science teacher with religious beliefs. The site states the facts given from other credible sources, such as the politically independent news source The Guardian, and then states personal opinions after the facts.  

 

Original article: 

http://conspiracygrimoire.com/nsa-busted-spying-with-major-internet-companies-the-conspiracy-is-real-the-prism-program/

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicolas Maxwell Carter
Scoop.it!

Internet Privacy: A Public Concern

Nicolas Maxwell Carter's insight:

Privacy concerns did not just pop up when the internet was born, they have been around for quite some time. The difference is that the internet, considering that essentially it is a big collection of data, has made is significantly easier to breach security and privacy. Lorrie Cranor covers this in more detail. She addresses that the internet and databases make automated collections of personal information easily. She claims that there should be slight comfort in the fact that, with such vast amounts of information being collected, few companies have the resources to search through all of it. This decreases the chances of actually having a breach in privacy, and to add to that, most of the information taken is simple junk mail and search histories. This does not make the invasion of privacy any less serious though. If anything solidifies Ms. Cranor's credibility, it should be that her writing was published by the Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.Their mission and purpose is to advance computing as a science and as a profession.

more...
No comment yet.