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The Irish Literary Times
Up-to-Date Coverage of The World of Irish Literature
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Speech Lessons by John Montague | World Literature Today

Speech Lessons by John Montague | World Literature Today | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it

Speech Lessons exhibits all the lyrical grace of John Montague’s previous volumes without ever slipping into easy nostalgia. His poems of memory do not simply look backward into a personal past but are woven into the fabric of history and, sometimes, mindful of what is to come (the volume ends with “the future, already whirling past”).

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Irish novelist Colm Toibin - Books and Arts Daily - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Irish novelist Colm Toibin - Books and Arts Daily - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Irish novelist Colm Toibin talks about his new book The Testament of Mary.

 

That's Mary as in Mary and Joseph. Mary, the Queen of Heaven. But this Mary is presenting herself without the soft focus of sanctity. Mary, a woman living in the city of Ephesus, is recalling, with devastating clarity, the life of her charismatic son. The antics of his fanatical followers. And the sheer, flesh-tearing horror of seeing her boy tortured to death. This is a short, devastating book. Some are calling it heresy.

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Drift - Film by Swoon based on the poem by Paul Perry

Film by Swoon based on the poem "For two NATO soldiers who drowned in an attempt to recover supplies from a river in the province of Badghis, Western Afghanistan,…...
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A much travelled thinker rooted in his home place

A much travelled thinker rooted in his home place | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Hubert Butler is one of the great essayists in the English language, the peer of Hazlitt, Robert Louis Stevenson and George Orwell. This may seem a startling claim, given that Butler’s work is known to a relatively small coterie of readers. The narrowness of his reputation is due not only to his natural modesty – he was surely the least noisy of writers – but to the fact that, although he was a much-travelled man, he cleaved steadfastly to his home place.
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Paul Muldoon Reflects on Reykjavik, Iceland

Paul Muldoon Reflects on Reykjavik, Iceland | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Paul Muldoon reflects on the steamy and colorful land of Björk.

 

The first Icelander I met was a poet and playwright who was visiting my home city, Belfast, in the early 1970s. He told me how, when he was a boy, Saturday night was invariably bath night. He also told me how, week in and week out, his mother would stand at the bottom of the stairs and call up to him, “Please be careful not to use all the cold water.”

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Salmon Poetry opens writing centre and bookshop in Co Clare

Salmon Poetry opens writing centre and bookshop in Co Clare | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it

Irish literary publisher Salmon Poetry has established a new writing centre and bookshop in Ennistymon, Co Clare. Taking its name from the Salmon of Knowledge in Celtic mythology, Samon Poetry was founded in 1981 as an alternative voice in Irish literature.

Since then over 300 volumes of poetry have been produced, specialising in the promotion of new poets, particularly women poets.

 

In 2013, The Salmon Bookshop & Literary Centre will host a monthly reading series, book launches and signings, creative writing workshops, and master classes facilitated by writers from Ireland, the US, UK and further afield.

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BBC Radio Interview with Elizabeth Bowen - Archive - Modern Writers - Truth and Fiction |

BBC Radio Interview with  Elizabeth Bowen - Archive - Modern Writers - Truth and Fiction | | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Programme: Truth and Fiction Subject: Radio interview with novelist Elizabeth Bowen... 

 

The importance of creating strong characters in fiction.
FIRST BROADCAST | 03 October 1956

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Saint Artaud by Aidan Mathews - RTÉ Drama on One

Saint Artaud by Aidan Mathews  - RTÉ Drama on One | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Saint-Artaud represents Artaud's carceral week in Ireland, his six-days-and-no-sabbath in De Valera's Dublin, through a fictive relationship with an elderly Metropolitan policeman who ministers to him in a station cell and through various encounters with visitors and visitants, legation officials and clergy of several faiths, who attempt to identify the alien at large in the basement of the barracks. And it undertakes the task as a radio-play, as word and breath, in the humbled awareness that Artaud, in the speechlessness of his own suffering, found language no more useful to his wants than
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Continuing our support of poetry - Gerard Smyth New Poetry Editor of The Irish Times

Continuing our support of poetry - Gerard Smyth New Poetry Editor of The Irish Times | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
WORD FOR WORD:In 1944, in the introduction to an anthology titled Poems from Ireland, its editor, Donagh MacDonagh, expressed his appreciation of the encouragement the then editor of this newspaper, RM Smyllie, had given to Irish poetry.
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Literature is Always Now - Selected Prose, by Derek Mahon

Literature is Always Now - Selected Prose, by Derek Mahon | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
It seems that in comparison to Yeats, contemporary Irish poets have been less given to prose writing. Yet when one looks at the record things are actually quite different. Seamus Heaney, for instance, has published several volumes of essays, a selection of which is gathered in Finders Keepers, while his Stepping Stones: Interviews with Dennis O’Driscoll is, in effect, an autobiography in disguise. Mention of which brings other prose memoirs to mind ‑ from Patrick Kavanagh’s wonderful Self-Portrait, Anthony Cronin’s Dead as Doornails, George Buchanan’s Morning Papers and Green Seacoast, to the autobiographical writing of Austin Clarke, Cecil Day Lewis, John Montague, Richard Murphy, Robert Greacen and Eavan Boland.
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The Spinning Heart by Donal Ryan

The Spinning Heart by Donal Ryan | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Tipperary born Donal Ryan’s The Spinning Heart is a first novel that has not only stunned critics, and launched the new Doubleday Ireland imprint in a unique collaboration with The Lilliput Press, but won Sunday Independent Best Irish Newcomer of the Year at the Bord Gais Energy Irish Book Awards 2012.

On the eve of the Awards, Writing.ie spoke to Donal Ryan to find out more about The Spinning Heart. Described by Jennifer Johnston as “Most beautifully written and plotted. What a writer! It is amazing to read about such grief and pain and yet end up elevated by the quality of the writing.

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Cadiz - New Short Story by Sean O'Reilly - The Irish Times

Cadiz - New Short Story by Sean O'Reilly - The Irish Times | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
As Crowley awaits his wife in this new short story, the contents of his neighbour’s house are thrown in a skip...

 

She walked the kids round to her sister’s. Only two streets away and she was still not back after an hour. Crowley stood in the shower, ironed his shirt and had got the flute ready. He was hoping there’d be a song or two later as he gargled with salt water at the sink and spat it out on to the breakfast dishes.

 

He flipped the lid on his phone. Debs wasn’t making him wait or maybe she was. Or she didn’t know herself if that was the plan for this morning. She’d deny it.

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"100 Myles... and Counting" - The International Flann O'Brien Society

"100 Myles... and Counting" - The International Flann O'Brien Society | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it

We wish to take this opportunity to announce the re-opening of our 100 Myles site with a new section called "100 Myles...and counting"! We hope that the site will serve as a meeting point for Brian O'Nolan scholars and as a home address of the nascent International Flann O'Brien Society (IFOBS). Which means that this is also a performative gesture: we are henceforth, quite officially, and to the full satisfaction of the law, a society.

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Reading of Paradise Lost in aid of NCBI | including Gerald Dawe, Seamus Heaney, Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill,

Reading of Paradise Lost in aid of NCBI |  including Gerald Dawe, Seamus Heaney,  Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it

On Friday 14 December, Trinity College will host the first full reading in Ireland of Paradise Lost, one of the longest poems in the English language, written by John Milton after he had lost his sight.

The reading will be held from 10am - 2pm in Trinity College in the Graduate Memorial Building (GMB) and then from 2pm - 10pm in the Gallery Chapel. All proceeds from the event will be donated directly to NCBI.

 

The event, which has been organised by Philip Coleman and Crawford Gribben of the School of English, has attracted the participation of a wide range of writers and public figures, including Gerald Dawe, Seamus Heaney, Dave Lordan, Thomas Luxon, Iggy McGovern, Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, David Norris, Michael O'Loughlin, Nessa O'Mahony, Eve Patten, Patrick Prendergast, Gerard Smyth, Joseph Woods, Macdara Woods, members of Trinity Players, students and staff of the School of English, and many more.

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Mike McCormack Interview - Short Film of his story The Terms

Mike McCormack Interview - Short Film of his story The Terms | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it

You grew up in the West of Ireland and indeed studied there. How much does the element of place infiltrate your writing?

Place is fundamental to my work. It is the generative ground of what I do and I am speaking about West Mayo and Galway – the villages, the fields and bogs of Mayo are a huge part of my imaginative landscape so too are the narrow streets of Galway. I would like to think that this deep rootedness and immersion in this landscape enables me to explore universal ideas of the human condition. It is both fount and ground.

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'I have bought turf online, but do very little of the stuff you're supposed to' - Kevin Barry

'I have bought turf online, but do very little of the stuff you're supposed to' - Kevin Barry | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
On a winter’s afternoon late in 1994, I sat with two friends in the attic bedroom of an old terraced house we were renting together on French’s Quay in Cork and we listened, rapt, to the gurgle and hiss of a dial-up internet connection inside a gigantic desktop computer.

It sounded like a beast trying to take form in there, and we smiled excitedly through the brownish fug of dope smoke – we were using the attic room also to grow cannabis plants under lamps mounted in the eaves. Memory perhaps elaborates the picture but I seem to remember that it took miles of cables, doorstoppers of computer manuals and weeks of hair-pulling complication to bring us to this moment.

 
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Poem by AUGUSTUS YOUNG Sunday Afternoon by the Sea in Argèles

Poem by AUGUSTUS YOUNG  Sunday Afternoon by the Sea in Argèles | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Sunday Afternoon by the Sea in Argèles...

 

For M (1948-2012)

 

Sitting on her wingchair

between the laurel rose bush

and the pompoms of pampas grass,

facing the bay between her and home,

what’s behind her dark glasses is reflected

in the passing fair, the carnival of a Sunday.

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METRE Poetry Magazine Archives

METRE Poetry Magazine Archives | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it

Metre was a magazine of poetry that ran for seventeen issues from 1995 to 2005. For most of that period it was edited by Justin Quinn and David Wheatley. It presented original poetry, reviews, interviews and essays. Published and printed in Ireland, edited by two Irish people, it nonetheless billed itself as 'A Magazine of International Poetry': the desire was present from the outset to provide a platform for the best of Irish work alongside the best from the UK, US, Australia as well as work in translation.

The magazine could not have continued without the generous support of the Arts Council of Ireland/An Chomhairle Ealaíon, and occasional support from the Arts Council of Northern Ireland. Also, patrons and sponsors generously contributed to our costs from the outset.

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DUBLIN DUCHESS: Bamboo Dreams: An Anthology of Haiku Poetry from Ireland ed. Anatoly Kudryavitsky

DUBLIN DUCHESS: Bamboo Dreams: An Anthology of Haiku Poetry from Ireland ed. Anatoly Kudryavitsky | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it

The anthology has an excellent introduction by Anatoly Kudryavitsky, the editor of Shamrock Haiku Journal, where he discusses the development of haiku in Ireland from an unsuspecting Patrick Kavanagh around 1965-67 and Juanita Casey, a travelling woman in 1968. The first collection by an Irish poet was Michael Hartnett's Inchicore Haiku in 1985. The Internet has been instrumental in creative exchange, namely Shiku Internet Haiku Salon which was popular in the late nineties and World Kigo Database. The first Irish haiku magazine Haiku Spirit ran from 1995-2000 founded by James Norton.

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Quietly - The Abbey (Peacock Stage)

Quietly -  The Abbey (Peacock Stage) | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Quietly- Northern Irish playwright Owen McCafferty’s powerful Abbey Theatre début wears its title ambiguously: A description perhaps of the silences that fall between men in the wake of sudden, torrential roaring; the kind that cannot be held back any longer. The kind that follow an uneasy and uncertain truce. Or maybe just an unattainable ideal: the hope of a life without the noisy chaos of sectarian violence.
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Ireland and the European Muse: Meet Harry Clifton

Ireland and the European Muse: Meet Harry Clifton | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
‘poetry for me is the pure formulation of experience and it is so pure that not many people can engage with it at that level but when it is diluted then people get it in the broader sense. You will always find that poetry precedes prose. Poetry is first and then come all the plays and prose.’

Harry Clifton is the current Ireland Chair of Poetry and dropped in to this year’s Dublin Book Festival, together with his wife poet Judith Mok, Michael O’Loughlin, Mary O’Donnell and Moya Cannon to talk about Europe and its inspirational forces upon our tiny little Island.

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‘The Bell’ Magazine and the Representation of Irish Identity, by Kelly Matthews -Reviewed by John Montague

‘The Bell’ Magazine and the Representation of Irish Identity, by Kelly Matthews -Reviewed by John Montague | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
IRISH LITERARY HISTORY: ‘The Bell’ Magazine and the Representation of Irish Identity, by Kelly Matthews, Four Courts Press, 208pp, €50...

 

That first copy of The Bell included an address, and so I began to frequent its pokey offices on O’Connell Street. These occasions could be fraught, because you never knew who you might meet in that small jousting space. Patrick Kavanagh was a regular contributor, but what I remember best was his being gracious to Jimmy Plunkett, who had written an essay on Kavanagh’s early poetry. And did Liam O’Flaherty slide through those cluttered offices, with a copy of one of his west of Ireland stories? And then there was a shy young man from Derry, Brian Friel, who crunched on sweets almost fervently, preferring them even to the offer of a drink.

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Kobo in Conversation: Roddy Doyle

Kobo in Conversation with....Roddy Doyle. The prolific author of novels including The Commitments, Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha and The Woman Who Walked Into Doors ...
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Video Interview with Edna O'Brien by her Faber Editor Lee Brackstone

'Exile and separation were very, very good for me.' A candid and illuminating career interview with Irish novelist and short story writer Edna O'Brien on publication of her memoir Country Girl 

 

Recorded in her London home, the interview -- which details her trepidation at writing her memoirs, the controversy surrounding her debut novel The Country Girls, her colourful life in 1960s London and much more -- is conducted by her Faber editor Lee Brackstone.

 

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The Garden and the Scattering - Poem by Michael Coady

The Garden and the Scattering - Poem by Michael Coady | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
POEM:...

 

Again the time has come for you

to call me from my book

and help put order

on the fallen leaves.

Before we can consign them

to bags or compost bin

there is the raking and sweeping....

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