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The Irish Literary Times
Up-to-Date Coverage of The World of Irish Literature
Curated by Gerard Beirne
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Rabbitte Guts: | Roddy Doyle's Blog

Rabbitte Guts:
1.
One minute Jimmy Rabbitte was 21. He was the manager of a band called The Commitments,
although they’d just broken up. He’d got over that shock and was just about ready to start a new
band. He’d learnt from the Commitments experience: never let a bollix be your singer, even if he
can sing; and never let your elderly trumpet player ride all, some or even one of the group’s backing
vocalists. Armed with this wisdom, he’d been gearing himself up, listening to new sounds, all set to
knock U2 off their fuckin’ perch.

The next minute he was 48 and he had bowel cancer.

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Afric McGlinchey - This is not a love song

Afric McGlinchey - This is not a love song | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
This is not a love song It’s hard to give you affection, indifferent as you are to the encompassing embrace or passing caress, and as for giving presents, well, I did not particularly bring you tho...
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What Seamus Heaney Did to Beowulf: An Essay on Translation and the Transmutation of English Identity

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Overview – Rhona Byrne / Overview – Macdara Woods | The Poetry Project

Overview – Rhona Byrne / Overview – Macdara Woods  |   The Poetry Project | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
I am here in my waiting room Over the aural park Hearing the announcement Of how the railway lines Will soon be disconnected But how
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New Irish Writing - How to Enter

New Irish Writing, edited by Ciaran Carty, is published in the Irish Independent on the last Saturday of every month and is open to writers who are Irish or are resident in Ireland.

 

All stories and poems published in New Irish Writing will be eligible for the 2013 Hennessy Literary Awards.

Awards are made annually in three categories: First Fiction (for writers publishing their first story), Emerging Fiction (for writers still to publish their first book) and Emerging Poetry (for first-time poets, or poets still to publish their first collection).

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Charles Macklin Autumn School

Charles Macklin Autumn School | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
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Poetry Interview: Padraig Rooney | Wales Arts Review

Poetry Interview: Padraig Rooney | Wales Arts Review | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it

Carl Griffin: The mesmerizing title poem of your 2010 collection The Fever Wardsdeservedly won the Strokestown International Poetry Prize. What brought this poem about?

 

Padraig Rooney: An aunt who I never knew visited me in a dream. She had died in the Thirties from tuberculosis. My father brought me to see the old fever hospital in Monaghan, where I was raised, before it was pulled down some time in the Sixties. I remember a wrecking ball. But a late Fellini movie, and Tarkovsky’s movies, would also play a part in the poem’s narrative surrealism, where outside is simultaneously inside, and the past tucked inside the present. Cinematic images came together with dream memory, I suppose.

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The Reading Life: Q and A with the author of This is the Way by Gavin Corbett - Winner of the Irish Novel of the Year Prize 2013

The Reading Life: Q and A with the author of This is the Way by Gavin Corbett - Winner of the Irish Novel of the Year Prize 2013 | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
I first became aware of the Irish Traveller culture through the short stories of Desmond Hogan.  How do you think Irish Travellers originated.?  Was it when Cromwell invaded, are they descended from tribal  groups that did not convert to Christianity as some claim, or is their origin more recent.?  What drew you to focus on Travellers in Dublin rather than in Caravans? I am not an ethnologist, a folklorist or a professional historian, so I have no idea whence the Irish  Travellers came. The Travellers have their own theories, none of which are backed by scientific or historical proof. The fact is, nobody – not ethnologists, not folklorists, not historians, not Travellers themselves – is sure where the Travellers came from, and I’m not sure if it’s possible to find out. I have heard all of those pieces of speculation that you mention, and probably until the end of time they will remain speculation. What drew me to write about Travellers in Dublin was not any particular need to represent a whole section of Irish society in fiction; I simply wanted my character Anthony to come from this interstitial, in-between world – not belonging to the city, and feeling outside his own traditionally  nomadic culture too.
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First look at the trailer for John Banville's The Sea

First look at the trailer for John Banville's The Sea | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
The trailer for film The Sea – starring Belfast man Ciarán Hinds – has been unveiled. The Sea débuted at the Edinburgh film festival last month.
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Paul McVeigh: Kevin Barry Interview

Kevin Barry is the author of two short story collections. His first,There Are Little Kingdoms won The Rooney Prize for Irish Literature and his latest, Dark Lies The Island, won the Edge Hill Prize, shortly after this interview. He also won The Sunday Times EFG Private Bank Short Story Award for Beer Trip to Llandudno. 

 His first novel, City of Bohane, won the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Prize and the Authors' Club First Novel Award. He is also a stage and screen writer.  Kevin has just edited the Faber anthology "Town & Country - New Irish Short Stories" and you can read my interview about this over at the Word Factory blog. The interview took place at the Society Club Soho on a blistering hot day when Kevin had just landed from Ireland and before the astonishing  reading of his New Yorker story Ox Mountian Death Song you can watch thanks to Word Factory
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Roddy Doyle interview: 'In all honesty, I would rather have been a musician than a writer'

Roddy Doyle interview: 'In all honesty, I would rather have been a musician than a writer' | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
As The Commitments hits the stage, Roddy Doyle shows us where it all began. 

You can learn an awful lot about a place if a kindly local decides to give you a tour. Right now, we’re out by Dublin Bay, just over the wooden bridge at Dollymount, walking up the long, thin road that bisects Bull Island. Up there somewhere lies the 128-year-old Royal Dublin Golf Club and beyond that a Victorian segregated swimming area.

Our kindly guide, the author and dramatist Roddy Doyle, is on home soil – he lives just a mile or so away – which may go some way to explain why he’s such relaxed and amiable company. Nothing is too much trouble and there’s a story hanging discretely on pretty much everything we can see, from the causeway we’re standing on (built on the city’s rubbish, so over-run with rats for years) to James Joyce 

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€350k Joyce first edition’s odyssey ends by being posted back to Cork

€350k Joyce first edition’s odyssey ends by being posted back to Cork | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
A literary treasure was sent from the US, by ordinary post, in a brown paper wrapping to a local society in Cork.
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Word for Word: Still more to savour this summer

Word for Word: Still more to savour this summer | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it

The Yeats Festival Season continues this month with readings and events in Sligo, among them Aloud , an evening of poetry and music featuring, among others, Gerard Dawe, Niall MacMonagle, Katie Donovan and James Harpur . It’s at the Hawk’s Well on August 3rd (8pm, €15/€13).

Seamus Heaney will read from his work at the same venue the following evening (8pm, €20), and on August 5th there will be a Yeats Summer Suite of Music, Spoken Word and Dance with music from The John Carty Festival Band and an excerpt from Meadbh - The Crimson Path read by poet Ann Joyce accompanied by the band and Melody Urquhart and the Melody Academy of Dance (8pm, €15/€12).

There’s an opportunity to hear Yeats’s poetry set to the music of Turlough O’Carolan at St Columba’s Church, Drumcliffe, in the shadow of Ben Bulben (August 1st, 7.30pm €10), and much more. treadsoftly.ie

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Birthdays today: Michael Longley | The Times

Birthdays today: Michael Longley | The Times | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it

Michael Longley, poet, 74

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On Reflection – June Fairhead / A Navy Skirt – Thomas McCarthy | The Poetry Project

On Reflection – June Fairhead / A Navy Skirt – Thomas McCarthy  |   The Poetry Project | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
A wet and house-bound day at the end of July we meet briefly and kiss among the coral islands of old clothes You are clearing
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John F. Deane New Poem: A Prelude

John F. Deane New Poem: A Prelude | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it

A Prelude


Flora in the roadside ditch
are boasting the water-colour purple of a pride of bishops:

vetch, knapweed, clover and the rosebay willow herb;
and I would make a poem

the way old Bruckner caught a flight of migrant birds in his
Ecce sacerdos magnus. . .

for eight-part choir, key magenta, though these times the spirit
slumps, mal tended in this old country. Now

a blackcap, fast and furtive, comes to feast on the white berries
of the dogwood hedge; bullfinch,

secretive, subdued, flit in a shock of rose-petal black and white
across the alder thicket...

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Mícheál Ó hAodha: An Fuíoll Feá – Rogha Dánta Liam Ó Muirthile

Mícheál Ó hAodha: An Fuíoll Feá – Rogha Dánta Liam Ó Muirthile | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
For one of the most talented writers of his generation, and arguably one of the foremost European post-war poets in any language, it is incredible how little recognition Liam Ó Muirthile has received in his own country. And you can’t ascribe this simply to the fact that he is writing in the “other” language. Ultimately, his referents are the same; he is a postmodern writer, a writer who drinks from the same wellspring as his English-language and European contemporaries and who is conversant with more languages than most.
There is something inherently wrong or “uncatholic” or (I’ll just say it, straight) “undemocratic” about the fact that Irish-language writers are ignored to the extent that they are in modern Ireland, simply because they write in a minority language, one of the oldest written vernaculars in Europe let it be said! 
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25 years on, can Jimmy Rabbitte still rock?

Twenty-five years after we first encountered him, Jimmy Rabbitte is back, though not the Jimmy Rabbitte who was everyone's favourite da from Roddy Doyle's trilogy of Barrytown novels and who was cherishably played by Colm Meaney in movies that endeared the character to audiences around the world.
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Inspiration for Wednesday: Thomas Kinsella

Inspiration for Wednesday: Thomas Kinsella | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
May wonders never cease: our poem today has been writ by a person who is yet alive! Thomas Kinsella (b.1928) is an Irish poet, known for writing with an edge of sarcasm and wit. His poems are atmos...
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Town and Country: New Irish Short Stories -Maureen Boyle bemoans the lack of northern writers

Town and Country: New Irish Short Stories -Maureen Boyle bemoans the lack of northern writers | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it

new selection for the fourth Faber and Faber book of new Irish short stories – not the 'best new', which was dropped with Joseph O’Connor’s selection in 2011 – makes some attempt to answer this.

Acknowledging the ‘bawl of demonic energy... of a newborn infant’ that characterises all of the stories in the book, he wonders if it is that Irish writers, facing up to the world, may sound a note of ‘laughter in the dark’ or even ‘against the dark’, and promises that we’ll hear that note many times in the collection. We do.

The darkness is often existential. Recessions, present and past, are there as backdrops to many of the stories, but in at least three of them characters speak of their sadness 

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The Hanging Gardens is the first new play by Frank McGuinness at the Abbey Theatre in 14 years.

The Hanging Gardens is the first new play by Frank McGuinness at the Abbey Theatre in 14 years. | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it

'Now we have a family, a rivalry, a purpose’

The Hanging Gardens is the first new play by Frank McGuinness at the Abbey Theatre in 14 years. It is an unflinching and familiar vision of the Irish family from one of the country’s most important playwrights.

A writer and his wife sit together in their garden. They are surrounded by a lifetime’s work; their home, their gardens and their children. Rachel wants to be congratulated on her pregnancy, Maurice is struggling for his father’s acceptance and Charlie needs his sacrifices to be acknowledged.

A crisis has drawn this family together but will their honesty pull them apart?

Frank McGuinness has enjoyed huge success at the Abbey Theatre with recent adaptations of John Gabriel Borkman (2010) and The Dead (2012) now he is back with a new play as part of the Dublin Theatre Festival.

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Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's curator insight, July 28, 2013 2:54 AM

I am travelling to Dublin to see this!

======================

Booking Information

Thursday 3 Oct – Saturday 9 November

Previews: Thursday 3 Oct – Tuesday 8 October

Monday – Friday 7.30pm, Sat matinees 2pm

on the Abbey stage

Tickets: €13 – €45 / Conc. €13 – €23

Book here:

http://www.abbeytheatre.ie/whats_on/performances/the-hanging-gardens-2013

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The Captivating Voice of an Irish Traveller: Gavin Corbett's 'This Is the Way' - ZYZZYVA

The Captivating Voice of an Irish Traveller: Gavin Corbett's 'This Is the Way' - ZYZZYVA | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it

Over the past few years, thanks in part to a TLC reality show, many of us have become fascinated with Irish Travellers, a group of unsettled people that moves about Ireland in caravans. For the most part, Travellers are a secretive culture, wary of outsiders, and in turn are viewed with a certain amount of disdain by “settled” people. In his second novel, This Is The Way (Faber and Faber; 230 pages), Irish writer Gavin Corbett explores the trials and tribulations of an Irish Traveller in an increasingly rooted world.

Anthony Sonaghan fears a rekindled feud between the two halves of his Traveller family, the Gillaroos and the Sonaghans. It’s a war so ancient and ingrained between the two families that there are myths about how the feud was started. Scared of getting caught up in the violence to come, Anthony hides out in a bustling tenement house in Dublin, away from his people. One day, the dullness of his life in hiding is upset by the appearance of his Uncle Arthur, who shows up with his hand heavily bandaged, missing a toe and obviously on the run. While taking care of the impish Arthur, Anthony is forced to face the past along with the troubles it presents and the questions it raises about his future.

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You Wrote the Book Podcast: Keith Ridgway Interview

You Wrote the Book Podcast: Keith Ridgway Interview | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Hello and welcome back to You Wrote The Book, a book based podcast hosted by Simon Savidge. Each fortnight over the coming months he will be joined by a special guest author to discuss their life a...
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Cúirt 2013: Seamus Heaney - Oysters & Ballinahinch Lake

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Belfast poet Sinead in the running for Forward Prize

Belfast poet Sinead in the running for Forward Prize | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it

Belfast poet Sinéad Morrissey has reached the shortlist for the 2013 Forward Prize for Poetry, for her latest collection, Parallax.

 

Born in Portadown, raised in Belfast and educated at Trinity College, Dublin, Morrissey’s poetic gift began to blossom early: she won the Patrick Kavanagh Poetry Award in 1990, when she was just 18.

Sinead, a lecturer in creative writing at Queen’s University, Belfast, has released four collections prior to her latest anthology: There Was Fire in Vancouver (1996), Between Here and There (2001), The State of the Prisons (2005), and Through the Square Window (2009). The title poem of the latter collection, which centres on the anxieties of motherhood and the darker corners of imagination, won first prize in the 2007 British National Poetry Competition.

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