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It's Time for Social and Emotional Learning for All

It's Time for Social and Emotional Learning for All | Ipads | Scoop.it

Over the last decade, increased attention has been paid to the social and emotional learning (SEL) needs of children. This area of learning is necessary and essential to address -- for children and adults.


It's time that schools take responsibility for meeting the entire range of learning needs that educators have -- the need to use new technologies, to understand and implement new standards, to use new assessment strategies, and their needs to attend to their own social and emotional learning.



Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 18, 2014 6:10 PM


It's time that schools take responsibility for meeting the entire range of learning needs that educators have -- the need to use new technologies, to understand and implement new standards, to use new assessment strategies, and their needs to attend to their own social and emotional learning.


Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, April 20, 2014 6:16 PM

Aprendizaje social y emocional.

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Flipboard As a Textbook Replacement | The Thinking Stick

Flipboard As a Textbook Replacement | The Thinking Stick | Ipads | Scoop.it
Cool idea, how you can use @Flipboard instead of textbooks in the classroom: http://t.co/gnW7ddP5Ah
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Apps for 21st Century Learning Skill Development | Macworld

Apps for 21st Century Learning Skill Development | Macworld | Ipads | Scoop.it

When it comes to apps for students, she looks for “apps that allow students to practise 21st century learning skills such as collaboration, communication and creative thinking – personalised and personal learning that allow students to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding”.


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11 Virtual Tools for the Math Classroom

11 Virtual Tools for the Math Classroom | Ipads | Scoop.it

"More and more classrooms are gaining access to technology that can be used with students. Whether you're modeling a lesson, creating stations or working in a one-to-one classroom, virtual tools can promote student engagement while increasing academic success."


Via John Evans
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Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, February 25, 2014 12:45 PM

Some awesome math apps to help your students learn math skills at a young age. 

Yossi Elran's curator insight, February 26, 2014 3:07 AM

אפליקאציות אייפד במתמטיקה

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Andress flips her classroom - The Glen Rose Reporter

Andress flips her classroom - The Glen Rose Reporter | Ipads | Scoop.it
Andress flips her classroom
The Glen Rose Reporter
The Glen Rose High School math teacher for algebra 1 and 2 has “flipped her classroom” in algebra 1 this year. “One subject was enough for my first time to use a flipped classroom,” she said.
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Rebooting "Learning Styles" | Knewton Blog

Rebooting "Learning Styles" | Knewton Blog | Ipads | Scoop.it

A learning strategy is a student’s learning path, whether deliberate or not, through particular content, and the resulting learning outcomes. And Knewton can measure the effects of these strategies, to the percentile, for every student, at the concept level.


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, March 26, 2014 5:39 PM

Interesting and controversial article.

Lou Salza's curator insight, April 8, 2014 11:44 AM

This reframing makes sense to me. It does an 'end run' around the arguments about learning styles--and goes right to the heart of what works for learners.--Lou

 

Excerpt:

 

A learning strategy is a student’s learning path, whether deliberate or not, through particular content, and the resulting learning outcomes. And Knewton can measure the effects of these strategies, to the percentile, for every student, at the concept level.

There are myriad learning strategies that Knewton measures and adjusts for. A sample of the ones we’re focused on now: the amount of content covered per session, the format of the learning experience (text vs. video vs. game vs. physical simulation vs. group discussion, etc.), the difficulty level of prose explaining a given concept, the difficulty of accompanying practice questions, the time of day, whether content contains mnemonic devices, whether it confuses cause and effect, whether it makes use of lists, student attention span, student engagement with particular learning content, strategic modalities (e.g., does the content define a procedure vs. address a common misconception vs. use a concrete example?), the presence or absence of learning aids (e.g., hints), user-specific features (e.g., difficulty relative to the student’s current proficiency), and many, many more.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 8, 2014 12:37 PM

It is more likely we possess a mixture of learning styles, learning strategies, and intelligences. Schools have become places where we attempt to push students into conforming and moving towards a mythical ideal which means those who do not conform stand out and there must be something wrong in their learning. It is more likely humans are on a continuum and learning is different for each of us. Yes, there are some who are at extreme ends of the continuum and learning is a challenge which has to be met. What would happen if the vast majority were given more freedom in their learning and teachers given freedom in working relationally with students?

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Learning vs Marks – What’s important to students? | Educating in the 21st Century


Via Chris Wejr, Lynnette Van Dyke, Ivon Prefontaine
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Chris Wejr's curator insight, February 24, 2014 9:46 AM

A great conversation starter by Delta educator Aaron Akune that includes some reflective questions that got me thinking (from when I was in the classroom more often): Do our students focus on task completion over learning? Do our students focus on grade-getting over learning? What messages do we send to our students with our assessments?

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 24, 2014 2:03 PM

Learning is about being able to increasingly assess one's progress. It is a process of increased self-direction, self-discipline, and reflection which enables learning. Marks are a snapshot in time and averages out learning in ways that may be deceptive. The self-assessment processes are important to make sense of the marks.