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iOS & OS X Development
cool tips and source code for Cocoa, Objective-C and Swift
Curated by Alessio Nonni
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Clean, versatile pull gesture for iOS perfectionists.

Clean, versatile pull gesture for iOS perfectionists. | iOS & OS X Development | Scoop.it

MOOPullGesture - Clean, versatile pull gesture for iOS perfectionists.

 

Comes with pull-to-create and pull-to-refresh.

 

 

✔ Sources: https://github.com/peyton/MOOPullGesture

 


Via Vincent Demay
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Aviary iOS SDK

Aviary iOS SDK | iOS & OS X Development | Scoop.it

iPhone and iPad image editor component

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JTRevealSidebarDemo

JTRevealSidebarDemo | iOS & OS X Development | Scoop.it

A carefully implemented iOS objective-c library to mimic the sidebar layout of the new Facebook app and Path 2.0 app.

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YRKSpinningProgressIndicators

YRKSpinningProgressIndicators | iOS & OS X Development | Scoop.it

I recently noticed this question about different-colored spinning progress indicators on Stack Overflow, and finally got around to giving my answer. I’m not sure if the original question was answered satisfactorily by using a UIActivityIndicatorView, but I hope my code can be useful to someone.

 

I have implemented two different clones of the spinning NSProgressIndicator, which can be drawn at any size and in any color. One is a subclass of NSView, and can be used on OS X 10.4, and the other is a subclass of CALayer, and can be used in a CoreAnimation-based project on OS X 10.5, and presumably on an iPhone (though I haven’t actually tested that yet).

 

I put the code up on github (both the NSView-based version and the CoreAnimation-based one), under the BSD license. They each include the spinning progress indicator classes and an example app showing how they can be used. The code should be pretty straight-forward. One caveat is that they might not be super fast performance-wise, but should be good for most uses.

 

✔ Sources: https://github.com/kelan/yrk-spinning-progress-indicator-layer

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ECSlidingViewController

ECSlidingViewController | iOS & OS X Development | Scoop.it

ECSlidingViewController is a view controller container for iOS that presents its child view controllers in two layers. It provides functionality for sliding the top view to reveal the views underneath it. This functionality is inspired by the Path 2.0 and Facebook iPhone apps.

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GMGridView

GMGridView | iOS & OS X Development | Scoop.it

GMGridView - A performant Grid-View for iOS (iPhone/iPad) that allows sorting of views with gestures (the user can move the items with his finger to sort them) and pinching/rotating/panning gestures allow the user to play with the view and toggle

 

✔ Sources: https://github.com/gmoledina/GMGridView#readme


Via Vincent Demay
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ALPopupView

ALPopupView | iOS & OS X Development | Scoop.it

ALPopupView is a flexible Facebook-like popup view that you can use to display any content you'd like: alert and notification messages, images, scrollable text, a web page, or anything else.

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SVProgressHUD

SVProgressHUD | iOS & OS X Development | Scoop.it

SVProgressHUD is an easy-to-use, clean and lightweight progress HUD for iOS. It’s a simplified and prettified alternative to the popular MBProgressHUD. Its fade in/out animations are highly inspired on Lauren Britcher’s HUD in Tweetie for iOS. The success and error icons are from Glyphish.

 

✔ Sources: https://github.com/samvermette/SVProgressHUD


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User Interface Customization in iOS 5 | Ray Wenderlich

User Interface Customization in iOS 5 | Ray Wenderlich | iOS & OS X Development | Scoop.it
To be successful on the App Store, your app needs to stand out. The vanilla user-interface “look and feel” provided by Apple just doesn’t cut it any more in a crowded market.


Many of the most popular apps on the App Store present standard iOS UI elements in a non-standard fashion:
Twitter employs a custom UITabBar
Instagram uses both a custom UITabBar and a custom UINavigationBar
Epicurious for iPad customizes elements of the standard split-view interface


Prior to iOS 5, many developers had to take somewhat unconventional approaches to achieve these results. Although subclassing and overriding drawRect: was the recommended approach, many resorted to the dreaded “method swizzling”.
But with iOS 5, those dark days are over! iOS 5 has included many new APIs you can use to easily customize the appearance of various UIKit controls.


To illustrate some of these new APIs, in this tutorial we’re going to take a “plain vanilla” app about surfing trips and customize the UI to get a more “beach-themed” look-and-feel.

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SNRHUDKit: 100% code-drawn, resolution independent HUD controls for AppKit

SNRHUDKit: 100% code-drawn, resolution independent HUD controls for AppKit | iOS & OS X Development | Scoop.it

SNRHUDKit is a framework that brings missing HUD controls and interface elements to AppKit.

 

All of the controls are fully compatible with OS X 10.6 and 10.7.

Each of the NSControl subclasses are completely independent (aside from a few categories) so you are free to pick and choose the controls you need instead of using the entire framework.

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GPUImage to apply GPU-accelerated filters and other effects to images

GPUImage to apply GPU-accelerated filters and other effects to images | iOS & OS X Development | Scoop.it

The GPUImage framework is a BSD-licensed iOS library that lets you apply GPU-accelerated filters and other effects to images, live camera video, and movies. In comparison to Core Image (part of iOS 5.0), GPUImage allows you to write your own custom filters, supports deployment to iOS 4.0, and has a simpler interface. However, it currently lacks some of the more advanced features of Core Image, such as facial detection.

 

For massively parallel operations like processing images or live video frames, GPUs have some significant performance advantages over CPUs. On an iPhone 4, a simple image filter can be up to 24X faster to perform on the GPU than an equivalent CPU-based filter.

 

However, running custom filters on the GPU requires a lot of code to set up and maintain an OpenGL ES 2.0 rendering target for these filters. I created a sample project to do this:

 

http://www.sunsetlakesoftware.com/2010/10/22/gpu-accelerated-video-processing-mac-and-ios

 

and found that there was a lot of boilerplate code I had to write in its creation. Therefore, I put together this framework that encapsulates a lot of the common tasks you'll encounter when processing images and video and made it so that you don't need to care about the OpenGL ES 2.0 underpinnings.

 

✔ Sources: https://github.com/BradLarson/GPUImage

 


Via Vincent Demay
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Alessio Nonni's comment, June 21, 2013 12:17 PM
also: http://nshipster.com/gpuimage/