Invasion of Normandy
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The Invasion of Normandy

description of D-day and the significance of the invasion.

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The Invasion of Normandy was the largest air, land, and sea operation undertaken before or since June 6, 1944. Which is kind of crazy since no one thought nobody could foreshadowed Hitler’s dream of Nazi domination. The invasion included 5,000 ships, 11,000 airplanes, and over 150,000 service men. It took years to plan the invasion and a lot of training. Young men under the age 20 were carrying eighty pound equipment. They had to go over 200 yards of beach before reaching any protection. General Dwight D. Eisenhower commanded the operation. Sending letters to General Marshall informing him about the operation. When the invasion was over, Allied forces had suffered nearly 10,000 casualties. More than 4,000 troops were dead. Somehow, due to planning and preparation, and due to the valor, fidelity, and sacrifice of the Allied Forces, Fortress Europe had been breached. The significance of The Invasion of Normandy was a crucial turning point in the war. It gave Hitler a view that he no longer had a chance at winning the war. Normandy helped the Allies win the war on the European front. It forced Hitler to fight on several fronts. Such as Italy, Russia, and France dividing. When the invasion succeeded Eisenhower proved he was a good commander. Also, he earned a lot of respect from his men. Airborne tactics were used in the Invasion. The airborne landings were greatly contributed to the Allies win on the invasion of Normandy. When proving they can fight, the Allied Forces were in Europe at the time. The Normandy Invasion was significant because Dwight D. Eisenhower earned respect and it was the first battle that used airborne tactics.

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Message Drafted by General Eisenhower in Case the D-Day Invasion Failed and Photographs Taken on D-Day

Message Drafted by General Eisenhower in Case the D-Day Invasion Failed and Photographs Taken on D-Day | Invasion of Normandy | Scoop.it
The National Archives Digital Classroom: Primary Sources, Activities and Training for Educators and Students.
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The letter is from Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower informing general Marshall of his plan and moves. He explains that the troops made it their fine. Also, he informs him how many ships and planes made it their. He states the weather and conditions of the area. He informs Marshall about his meeting with the British troops. He states he will keep him informed about the rest of the operation.

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D-Day Overview

D-Day Overview | Invasion of Normandy | Scoop.it
The National D-Day Memorial located in Bedford, Virginia is tribute to those who bravery and valor fought and died during the invasion during World War II in Normandy in Axis occupied France on June 6, 1944.
Capri Michelle's insight:

The Invasion of Normandy was the largest air, land, and sea operation undertaken on June 6, 1994. The landing included over 5,000 ships and over 150,000 service men. The terms D-day and H-hour are used for the day and hour on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. It took years to plan out the Invasion to take over Hitler.

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Normandy Invasion, June 1944

Normandy Invasion, June 1944 | Invasion of Normandy | Scoop.it
D-Day, a historical overview and special image selection, photographs, on the June 1944 invasion of Normandy, provides links to additional views, information, on this subject, US Navy Normandy, U.S. Navy.
Capri Michelle's insight:

On June 6, 1944 the western Allies landed in France. The invasion was commanded by U.S. Army General Dwight D. Eisenhower. He planned the invasion in 1942 by Allied forces in Britain. The Allied forces played many roles in the invasion. The invasion of Normandy was to takeover Hitler's nation.

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D-Day | Article | The United States Army

D-Day | Article | The United States Army | Invasion of Normandy | Scoop.it
A collection of U.S. Army photography from the build up of troops in England, to the beaches and airborne landings in France.
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The pictures show General Dwight speaking to his troops. Some pictures show the troops in postition. Also, in the pictures, the troops were in action. One picture shows the gun with a cap on it, to show there victory.

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General Eisenhower's Message - D-Day - June 6, 1944 - the United States Army

General Eisenhower's Message - D-Day - June 6, 1944 - the United States Army | Invasion of Normandy | Scoop.it
The U.S. Army remembers June 6, 1944: The World War II D-Day invasion of Normandy, France.
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The transcript states Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower hopes and prayers of liberty people everywhere. Dwight explains what the people should get ready for when the war appears. Also, he is informing that he will not lose and this will be a victory to defeat Hitler. He states its his duty to protect his people and help them. He believes he is doing this invasion for all the right reasons. "I have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty and skill in battle. We will accept nothing less than full victory!" Dwight said.

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D-Day - June 6, 1944 - the United States Army

D-Day - June 6, 1944 - the United States Army | Invasion of Normandy | Scoop.it
The U.S. Army remembers June 6, 1944: The World War II D-Day invasion of Normandy, France.
Capri Michelle's insight:

June 6, 1994 160,000 Allied troops landed in Western Europe. The troops fought Nazi Germany. Genereal Dwight D. Eisenhower called the operation. There were over 5,000 ships and more than 9,000 Allied Soldiers were killed or wounded but more than 100,000 Soldiers began the march across Europe to defeat Hitler.

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