Intuition
Follow
Find
7.1K views | +21 today
Intuition
Professionelle Intuition im Management | Lernen Sie Ihre Intuition zu lesen <a href="http://www.mentale-intuition.de" rel="nofollow">http://www.mentale-intuition.de</a>
Curated by Thomas Menk
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

Intuition is Intelligence for Your Life

Intuition is Intelligence for Your Life | Intuition | Scoop.it

Intuition is so simple yet we continually complicate it.

Intuition is that little  voice you hear when you are getting ready to go out that says, “Take the umbrella.” And, it’s the internal pull you feel toward befriending one single solitary person when in a room full of people. It is also the sickening sense you get when you know you’ve been betrayed even before the facts come out.

Intuition is a form of intelligence.

And just what is intelligence? Intelligence is the ability to understand and use information to navigate your life. Intuition tells us it’s going to rain before we listen to the weather, that someone across the room is going to become your new best friend or future mate or that someone has lied and betrayed you. This is useful information for your life. And that’s just what your intuition is there for, to give you useful information about your life.

So, why do we complicate intuition?

We mix up intuition with psychism, and mediumistic phenomena and speak about it all in the same breath when in reality the three are very different. Psychism goes beyond the self to gather information about others. Mediumiship is communication with discarnate beings. While not everyone is a psychic or a medium, everyone is intuitive. Our non-stop busy world is full of distractions that make it easy to overlook these subtle pieces of information. Intuition flashes through the mind so quickly that if we don’t train ourselves to listen or become aware of our bodily reactions we quickly forget them and move on to the next thing. If you listen to your internal voice, become aware of your gut reactions (that pull toward or feeling of aversion) which is how your body communicates you will be equipped with more information with which to make better decisions and choices in your life; even if it is simply that you don’t get caught in a downpour because you left your umbrella at home.....

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

Intuition as the Basis for Creativity

Intuition as the Basis for Creativity | Intuition | Scoop.it

Recently, a parent who is also a teacher, asked me on behalf of a friend to offer some advice on how to ensure that her child will grow up to exemplify a sense of higher conscientiousness. In moments like these, past recollections come to mind of parents having inquired about methods, ideas or techniques that might assist them in raising their children’s aptitudes for one particular trait or another, which they believe to be of the utmost importance. Sought after advice comes in various contexts and requests, such as “I just want my child to be ~ smart and successful” or, “just be able to use good judgment in all matters”, or “have good manners and social behavior” or, “be happy and know the value of hard work”, “live his passion”, “be a good critical thinker”, “get along with everyone”, “contribute something to the world”, “use free will responsibly”, “make good decisions”, “have common sense”, etc.


I often respond by asking, “well what about creativity, or intuition”? The response for this question is “what about them?” – followed by a reiteration regarding their original request. Some folks reply with, “yeah, those are ‘okay’, but what really concerns me are success and responsibility (or, happiness and making smart decisions, etc.).”


Again, I probe and press on saying, “just out of curiosity, what would be your definition of creativity, and intuition”? It is here that I get quaint and vague answers, which are justifiable since they feel the traits of intuition and creativity have lesser values. Then I ask their definition of their original request, whatever their top-of-the-list, or very sought after quality is, such as conscientiousness.


In practically every case, the definitions for these “more important qualities” are as indistinct and ambiguous as their definitions for the “unimportant” qualities of creativity and intuition. At this point I realize that offering distinct direction for an indistinct definition is going to be somewhat of a challenge, because, unless we agree on a same or similar definition, we may as well be having two different conversations where never the twain shall meet. This in itself is the definition of a sad truth, where people use same words with different meanings, each believing their meaning to be the truer one.....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

The Top 11 Reasons You Ignore Your Intuition

The Top 11 Reasons You Ignore Your Intuition | Intuition | Scoop.it
Here are the top reasons you ignore your intuition:

1. Doubt. You play down the importance of this “voice.”

Antidote: You need to develop trust in your intuition. The only way to do this is to listen to these whispers and act upon them. The more you do and find they are “right” the more trust you’ll gain in your inner voice.


2. Lack of intention. Listening to your intuition is not a priority in your life.

Antidote: You’ve got to create an intention to develop your intuition. After all if you don’t make it a priority to listen this voice, who will? Recognize the importance of these messages from your intuitive wisdom and become conscious of them.


3. Monkey mind. You lack focus and clarity in your thinking.

Antidote: You have not set aside time each day to meditate and clear your mind. Develop the habit of sitting in silence and listening for 20 minutes a day. Your thoughts will slow and your intuition will come through more loudly and clearly.


4. Insecurity. You listen to others (external voices) rather than yourself.

Antidote: You must develop your self-confidence and self-reliance. Pay attention to how you feel when you override your own instincts to listen to what others say you should do. Feeling “twisted” up inside like maybe it’s “wrong” is a signal that you’ve ignored your inner wisdom.


5. Multi-tasking. You are always in a hurry and doing too many things at once.

Antidote: Stop it! When you rush and try to accomplish too much at once you will not hear this subtle voice. Focus on one thing at a time. Take breaks where you walk away and give yourself a breather so your intuition can come through.


6. Distraction. You are never alone or have your cell phone, radio or television on at all times.

Antidote: If you cannot be alone with your self and need to have constant company, conversation or “noise” you will block your intuition from coming through. Turn everything off and spend at least an hour a day being “mindful” while you accomplish a simple task such as washing the dishes.


7. Self-medicating. You drink, do drugs or use food to shut out your inner voice.

Antidote: Using any substance to deal with your fears or quiet the critical internal voice will also block your intuition. Try journaling to get in touch with these inner stressors instead. When you write about your feelings you become conscious of what is driving you to self-medicate.


8. Toxic relationships. You live with or are involved with controlling or negative people.

Antidote: Find a way to cut off from or lessen the time you spend around toxic people. If you can’t get away make it a habit to have “alone” time. Toxic people poison your thoughts and undermine your confidence and self-esteem which muffles your intuition.


9. Control. You are a controlling personality who is attached to things turning out exactly as you think they should.

Antidote: Having to be “in control” all the time comes from having many fears. You fear what may happen if you don’t “control” the outcome. This is a no win way to live though. You cannot control everyone or everything. Learn to let go and allow the answers to bubble up naturally.


10. Negativity. You have a habit of thinking negatively.

Antidote: Look for the positive in everything. Stop looking for what can go wrong. Change your attitude and look for what can go right instead. You created the habit of thinking negatively and you can break that habit too – if you want to. Negative thinking overrides your intuition. You’ll hear it but you won’t believe it!


11. People pleasing. You put yourself last all the time.

Antidote: Stop putting the needs of others ahead of yourself all the time. Yes, we should help others and be selfless at times but, not at the expense of ignoring our own needs. People pleasing is a habit that absolutely shuts down your intuition.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

How to Make Things Less Complicated by Using Our Instincts and Intuition

How to Make Things Less Complicated by Using Our Instincts and Intuition | Intuition | Scoop.it


I don't really like using instructional manuals when I have to put something together, especially the ones that look like mini-encyclopedias. I prefer using my instincts and intuition to figure it out, which is said to be our "knowing pointing the way." We're born with both intuition and instincts. The difference between the two, supposedly, is that intuition is something we gain through experience, and instinct isn't based on having any prior experience; however, they are words often used interchangeably, and both skills can be extremely helpful in our lives. Following directions from a manual can be useful, even necessary at times, especially when something has a lot of steps, but sometimes it seems that the instructions can almost make things more complicated. One time I was putting together a clothing rack and was following the directions, and when it came time to put in the screws, there weren't any. I checked the list of the contents and it said that eight screws were included, but after searching each individual bag of contents a few times, I was absolutely certain there were none, and was prepared to go back to the store and get another clothing rack and start over. I finally found a little piece of paper at the bottom of the box that said the screws were already screwed in to the bar and you can "omit step five in the instructions." Good to know. It made me wonder how many people put together the contents, and if the right hand doesn't know what the left hand is doing, which it seemed like in that particular instance, you end up with a little piece of paper at the bottom of a box telling you what you need to know, if you' re lucky! I think that's why I've gotten used to listening to my intuition a lot of the time when I'm figuring out how to work something because sometimes I feel that things are made more complicated than they need to be, and since I consider myself capable of figuring out most things, why not give it a try. If I happen to get stuck and need to use a manual, it's there to refer to -- plus, it can just be fun to challenge ourselves to figure it out on our own, like a Rubik's cube.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

Big data and decision making: data vs intuition

Big data and decision making: data vs intuition | Intuition | Scoop.it

There is certainly hype around ‘big data’, as there always has been and always will be about many important technologies or ideas – remember the hype around the Web? Just as annoying is the backlash anti big data hype, typically built around straw men – does anyone actually claim that big data is useful without analysis? One unfair characterization both sides indulge in involves the role of intuition, which is viewed either as the last lifeline for data-challenged and threatened managers, or as the way real men and women make the smart difficult decisions in the face of too many conflicting statistics.

Robert Carraway, a professor who teaches Quantitative Analysis at UVA’s Darden School of Business, has good news for both sides. In a post on big data and decision making in Forbes, “Meeting the Big Data challenge: Don’t be objective” he argues ”that the existence of Big Data and more rational, analytical tools and frameworks places more—not less—weight on the role of intuition.” Carraway first mentions Corporate Executive Board’s findings that of over 5000 managers 19% were “Visceral decision makers” relying “almost exclusively on intuition.” The rest were more or less evenly split between “Unquestioning empiricists” who rely entirely on analysis and “Informed skeptics … who find some way to balance intuition and analysis.” The assumption of the test and of Carraway was that Informed skeptics had the right approach. A different study, “Frames, Biases, and Rational Decision-Making in the Human Brain“, at the Institute of Neurology at University College London tested for correlations between the influence of ‘framing bias’ (what it sounds like – making different decisions for the same problem depending on how the problem was framed) and degree of rationality. The study measured which areas of the brain were active using an fMRI and found the activity of the the most rational (least influenced by framing) took place in the prefrontal cortex, where reasoning takes place; the least rational (most influenced by framing / intuition) had activity in the amygdala (home of emotions); and the activity of those in between (“somewhat susceptible to framing, but at times able to overcome it”) in the cingulate cortex, where conflicts are addressed.

It is this last correlation that is suggestive to Carraway, and what he maps to being an informed skeptic. In real life, we have to make decisions without all or enough data, and a predilection for relying on either data or intuition can easily lead us astray. Our decision making benefits by our brain seeing a conflict that calls for skeptical analysis between what the data says and what our intuition is telling us. In other words, intuition is a partner in the dance, and the implication is that it is always in the dance — always has a role.

Big data and all the associated analytical tools provide more ways to find bogus patterns that fit what we are looking for. This makes it easier to find false support for a preconception. So just looking at the facts – just being “objective” – just being “rational” – is less likely to be sufficient.

The way to improve the odds is to introduce conflict – call in the cingulate cortex cavalry. If you have a pre-concieved belief, acknowledge it and and try and refute, rather than support it, with the data.

“the choice of how to analyze Big Data should almost never start with “pick a tool, and use it”. It should invariably start with: pick a belief, and then challenge it. The choice of appropriate analytical tool (and data) should be driven by: what could change my mind?…”


Of course conflict isn’t only possible between intuition and data. It can also be created between different data patterns. Carraway has an earlier related post, “Big Data, Small Bets“, that looks at creating multiple small experiments for big data sets designed to minimize identifying patterns that are either random or not significant. Thanks to Professor Carraway for elevating the discussion. Read his full post.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

Workshop Mentale Intuition vom 18.04. – 19.04.2013 | Thomas Menk

Workshop Mentale Intuition vom 18.04. – 19.04.2013 | Thomas Menk | Intuition | Scoop.it


Die MENTALE INTUITION ist eine der effektivsten erlernbaren Methoden um zu besseren Entscheidungen zu gelangen, nachhaltige Ideen zu entwickeln und die zunehmende Komplexität unseres Arbeitsalltages zu meistern. Erwecken Sie Ihre intuitiven Fähigkeiten um gezielte themenbezogene Informationen aus Ihrem unbewussten Wissensspeicher zu erhalten.

Workshop Mentale Intuition - Lernen Sie Ihre Intuition zu lesen vom 18.04. – 19.04.2013 | Thomas Menk

Thomas Menk's insight:

Informationen und Anmeldung unter nachfolgendem Link:

http://www.mentale-intuition.de/das-training/

 

 

more...
Philippe Trebaul's curator insight, February 21, 2013 5:01 AM
Atelier Mentale Intuition vom 18.04. - 19.04.2013 | Thomas Menk


Die MENTALE INTUITION ist eine der effektivsten erlernbaren Methoden um zu zu besseren Entscheidungen gelangen, nachhaltige Ideen zu entwickeln und die zunehmende Komplexität unseres zu Arbeitsalltages meistern. Erwecken Sie Ihre intuitiven Fähigkeiten um gezielte themenbezogene Informationen aus Ihrem unbewussten erhalten zu Wissensspeicher. Atelier Mentale Intuition - Lernen Sie Ihre Intuition lesen zu vom 18.04. - 19.04.2013 | Thomas Menk


Workshop Mentale Intuition vom 18.04. – 19.04.2013 | Thomas Menk via @tmenk http://sco.lt/...

Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

Gehirn fühlt kausale Zusammenhänge

Gehirn fühlt kausale Zusammenhänge | Intuition | Scoop.it

Wenn wir ein Auto sehen, das gegen eine Laternen fährt und dann eine deformierte Laterne, wissen wir instinktiv: Die Kollision ist schuld. Ein internationales Forscherteam hat nun festgestellt, dass wir solche kausalen Zusammenhänge schon beim grundlegenden Sehprozess erkennen – ohne Beteiligung von höheren kognitiven Vorgängen. Das zeigt sich daran, dass beim wiederholten Betrachten von kausalen Zusammenhängen ein ähnlicher Gewöhnungseffekt eintritt wie bei der Wahrnehmung der Größe, Farbe oder Distanz eines Objektes, wie die Forscher im Fachmagazin " Current Biology" berichten.

 

Ein Dominostein fällt um und reißt auch alle weiteren mit sich. Eine Hand stößt ans Glas, es fällt um und die Milch ergießt sich über den Küchentisch. Für den Beobachter ist sofort klar: Das Fallen des Dominos und das ungeschickte Berühren des Milchglases mit der Hand hat das Malheur bewirkt. Bislang waren sich Wissenschaftler uneins darüber, ob höhere Gehirnprozesse wie logisches Schlussfolgern dieses Kausalitätsurteil begründen – oder ob das Urteil bereits bei der Sinneswahrnehmung entsteht, ähnlich der Einschätzung von Größe, Distanz oder Bewegung eines Objektes. Eine internationale Forschergruppe um Martin Rolfs am Bernstein Zentrum Berlin, Michael Dambacher an der Universität Konstanz und Patrick Cavanagh an der Universität Paris Descartes hat nun die Antwort auf diese Frage gefunden: Schnelle Kausalitätsurteile werden bereits auf der Stufe der einfachen visuellen Wahrnehmung gefällt.

Thomas Menk's insight:

Bewertung von Ursache und Wirkung geschieht ohne höhere Denkvorgänge

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

Die Willensfreiheit - ein Irrtum?

Die Willensfreiheit - ein Irrtum? | Intuition | Scoop.it
Wolf Singer hält den freien Willen für nicht existent. John-Dylan Haynes fand in seiner Arbeit, dass das Bereitschaftspotential schon weit vor der einer Handlung messbar ist. Beide nehmen Stellung auf einer Veranstaltung des Bernstein Centers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

How To Use Visualization To Improve Your Intuition

Clairvoyance, clairaudience and other “clairs” comes with psychic intuition development. But such development need to be supported by conscious mind, and there’s interesting exercise, more like technique, that can improve your intuitive work. All you need is some visualization skills.

Your brain knows what is good for you – at least to some degree. One day, or should I say, one night I begun to experience visions. Like dreams, except the fact I was completely conscious during these, and I was able to clearly recall all the images, and even make notes. Another night I’ve seen a library, in which I had full control over my movements – so I’ve picked up a book, and I saw a symbol. Its meaning is not important, everything else is.

You see, your brain is an interesting tool for working with clairvoyance.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

Fehlendes Bauchgefühl lässt Ältere leichter auf Betrüger hereinfallen

Fehlendes Bauchgefühl lässt Ältere leichter auf Betrüger hereinfallen | Intuition | Scoop.it


Ältere Menschen fallen häufiger auf Betrüger herein als jüngere. Warum, das haben US-amerikanische Forscher jetzt herausgefunden: Ältere erkennen die Anzeichen für Unehrlichkeit und mangelnde Vertrauenswürdigkeit im Gesicht anderer Menschen nicht mehr so gut. Zudem reagiert auch ein für die instinktive Risikoabschätzung wichtiges Zentrum ihres Gehirns weniger stark als bei jüngeren, wie Hirnscans ergaben. Den älteren Menschen fehle dadurch das warnende Bauchgefühl, das normalerweise dabei helfe, Verstellung und böse Absichten bei anderen zu erkennen, berichten die Wissenschaftler im Fachmagazin "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences". Zusammen genommen könnten beide Effekte erklären, weshalb ältere Menschen weniger misstrauisch seien und daher für Betrüger häufig eine leichte Beute.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

Trotz Business Intelligence verlassen sich Manager lieber auf ihr Bauchgefühl

 

BI-Tools versprechen Entscheidungen auf Basis klarer Daten und Fakten. In Deutschland und den USA investieren die Unternehmen zwar in die Technologie. Entscheidungen werden dennoch sehr oft nicht auf Basis betriebswirtschaftlicher Analyse getroffen. Im Zweifel folgen deutsche Entscheider lieber ihrer Intuition als kalten Zahlen und Fakten – mögen diese auch noch so aufwendig ermittelt worden sein. Nun war das Vertrauen in die Eingebung hierzulande immer schon ausgeprägt. Erstaunlich ist allerdings, dass das Pendel zwischen Bauchgefühl und nüchternen Daten trotz erheblicher Investitionen in Business Intelligence (BI) in den vergangenen Jahren in Richtung Intuition zurückgeschlagen hat. Eine Studie der Unternehmensberatung Novem Business Applications legt dies jedenfalls nahe. Mehr als die Hälfte der rund 300 von Novem befragten Manager gaben an, mit Entscheidungen nach Bauchgefühl besser gefahren zu sein als mit jenen auf Grundlage von Fakten. Vor vier Jahren sagten das lediglich 47 Prozent. Und aktuell halten nur 42 Prozent die Entscheidungen auf Basis von reinen betriebswirtschaftlichen Daten für erfolgreicher....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

No intuitions no relativism

No intuitions no relativism | Intuition | Scoop.it

 

Norwegian philosopher Herman Cappelen interviewed by Richard Marshall.

Herman Cappelen is mounting a fierce defence of his armchair against the crazyist gang over at X-phi – although he doesn’t want his counter-attack to be just about X-phi. He expects it to run and run. He writes about when language talks about language. He thinks analytic relativism a mistake and that truth is monadic. He thinks talk of possible worlds is the path to many errors. He thinks Kripke original, deep and almost entirely true. He thinks Lewis original deep and almost entirely false (but dangerously seductive because his errors are hidden). All in all this is one groovaciously pugnacious philosophical dude.....

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Thomas Menk from Weiterbildung
Scoop.it!

Die biologische Grundlage unseres Entscheidungsverhaltens

Die biologische Grundlage unseres Entscheidungsverhaltens | Intuition | Scoop.it

 

Der Mensch versteht viele Dinge – nur sein eigenes Gehirn kaum. Die Neuroökonomie will herausfinden, wieso wir gewisse Entscheidungen rational und anderer irrational fällen. Sie zeigt Wege auf, wie wir Entscheide optimieren könnten. Werden wir durch solche Erkenntnisse eines Tages zu besseren Investoren, Managern, Bürgern oder gar Menschen?


Via Sascha Reimann
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

Wie trifft man gute Entscheidungen? Ratio versus Intuition …

Wie trifft man gute Entscheidungen? Ratio versus Intuition … | Intuition | Scoop.it

Das Thema Intuition hatte wir schon einige Male anklingen lassen. Ich habe mir gerade den Vortrag Wie trifft man gute Entscheidungen? des Direktors des Max-Planck-Instituts für Bildungsforschung, Prof. Gigerenzer, gehalten auf den Petersberger Gesprächen 2012, angehört, und auch er empfiehlt uns, neben der Logik auch die Intuition zu nutzen. Besonders wenn die Entscheidung auf einem komplexen, unsicheren Hintergrund erfolgen soll. Die Botschaft der Verfechter des rationalen Entscheidens lautet: Zuerst wägen, dann wagen. Zuerst analysieren, dann agieren.

Was ist Intuition? Nach Gigerenzer ist das gefühlte Wissen, was sehr schnell im Bewusstsein ist, aber die Gründe dafür sind nicht bewusst: SIE SIND NICHT IN SPRACHE! Dieser Teil des Wissens ist der bei Weitem größte. Wer also nicht auf seine Intuition hört, nutzt den größten Teil seines Gehirns nicht. Intuition sei kein sechster Sinn und auch keine göttliche Eingebung. Intuition funktioniert auf viel Erfahrung, sich auf das Wesentliche zu konzentrieren und den Rest zu ignorieren.

 

Siehe dagegen die heutige ökonomische Theorie des erwarteten Nutzenmaximierens: liste die Möglichkeiten mit ihren Pros und Kons, dann gewichte und berechne. Auf die Frage, wer seinen Ehepartner so ausgewählt hätte, kam ein Handzeichen. Klick? Unsere Gesellschaft tolleriere keine Bauchentscheidungen. Dennoch würden insgeheim die Manager zu 50% oder gar mehr intuitiv entscheiden, so eine Analyse in einem deutschen Daxunternehmen. So wird häufig nach der insgeheim getroffen Entscheidung noch ein rechtfertigendes Gutachten teuer eingekauft, das dann die rationalen Gründe noch nachliefert. Typisch sind hier Firmenkulturen mit Nullfehlertolleranz, so dass jeder Manager lieber seinen Arsch rettet als zum Nutzen der Firma zu handeln, indem er nicht oder eben defensiv entscheidet. So würden 30-40% eher weniger zuträgliche Entscheidungen getroffen. Besonders schlimm ist es offensichtlich in der Ärzteschaft der USA. Dort würde aus Eigenschutz zu 93% gegen den Patentien entschieden. Wir misstrauen der Intuition Anderer, aber trauen den Formeln von Experten blind. Er zeigt dies am Beispiel der kaum treffenden Vorhersagen der Entwicklung des Euros seitens der Top-Banken in den letzten Jahren (wir erinnern uns auch ungerne an die Voraussagen unserer Wirtschaftsweisen, wo auch viel Geld für “Mist” in den Himmel ging. So mancher Hungernde hätte sich über das Geld gefreut.

Komplexität mit viel Unsicherheit müsse mit Einfachheit begegnet werden, so Gigerenzers Empfehlung.

 

Sein Fazit:

Intuition beruht auf schnellen, heuristischen Prozessen, die oft zu bessern Entscheidungen in einer unsicheren Welt führen als die kompliziertesten, statistischen Verfahren. Mehr Zeit, mehr Information und mehr Berechnung ist nicht immer besser. Weniger kann mehr sein.

 

In seinem Vortrag geht er noch auf einige Untersuchungen ein, wann die Intuition besser greift, u. a. geht er auch auf den Unterschied von Golf-Experten und -Anfänger ein, wenn für den Abschlag nur 3 Sekunden Zeit gegeben werden. Und auch Jens Lehmanns berühmter Zettel beim Elfmeterschießen gegen Argentinien kommt zur Sprache.....

more...
Philippe Vallat's comment, April 22, 2013 11:27 AM
Leider ist die Definition von Herrn Gigerenzer falsch. Laut Duden: "das unmittelbare, nicht diskursive, nicht auf Reflexion beruhende Erkennen, Erfassen eines Sachverhalts oder eines komplizierten Vorgangs". Wenn es heuristische Prozessen sind, ist es Reflexion, d.h. keine Intuition...
Pascale Mousset's comment, April 22, 2013 1:32 PM
Dommage que ce soit en Allemand ! Ca me semble hyper interessant d' après quelques notions rescapées de ma scolarité. Ce theme m 'interesse beaucoup si vs le trouvez en Fr ou En ...that will be Great !
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

7 Tips To Hone Your Intuition

7 Tips To Hone Your Intuition | Intuition | Scoop.it


The intuitive language is an internal one that defies cognitive reasoning. It's also silent, sudden and self-confident. Your instincts just know. When you ignore them, however, they can become increasingly louder. They're like toes being stepped on. They don't like it and they make you scream out in agony. Still, we tend to promote self-doubt and push them away; trust isn't immediate. Intuition may be felt as a whisper or like a bolt of lightning, but we all have the capacity to hear it.  Sometimes following a hunch can save your life. One student I know paid attention to her hunch about her car and found out she had brake problems; her instinct prevented an accident. Another student told me it helped him earn a fortune by selling his stocks at the right time. When we listen to our inner GPS on our yoga mat, we cultivate healthy self-respect and choose a safe and opening practice. Whether you call it a "hunch," a "gut" feeling or any other term, our intuition speaks to us and gives us insight and wisdom for making any number of decisions. When you can hear this inner voice and respond to it, you'll lead a more authentic life. Learning to listen to our intuition is an art and a skill, and you can practice it until you get it right. Here are seven tips to hone these important intuitive skills:

 

1. Set aside time for silentsitting; it cultivates a space for listening.

 2. Get comfortable with solitude; it helps you rely on your self. 3. Listen to your body more; learn to decode its sensations and signals. 4. Be honest; build integrity and authenticity in your word and deed.
5. Test your instincts out on simple things; try it next time your phone rings.
6. When you're right, say to yourself, "Thank you for listening." It builds trust and confidence.
7. Know yourself; quiet the inner critic and trust in your own voice and advice.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

How to Connect With Your Intuition

How to Connect With Your Intuition | Intuition | Scoop.it


Intuition is your ability to understand something immediately, without the need for conscious reasoning. Most people get far too caught up in their thoughts to recognize their intuitive hits --and that's a real shame. Your intuition is a sense of knowing, without any logic to "back it up." It's that feeling that something's right or wrong, fitting or unfitting, safe or unsafe. When you're disconnected from your intuition, it can be nearly impossible to know what you should do in important situations. Should you move in with the guy you've been seeing? Should you take that job offer? Should you go to that event that's thousands of miles and a hefty plane ticket away? How can you answer fully and completely from your heart and soul when you're too busy weighing the pros and cons or thinking about the how-tos and what-ifs?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Thomas Menk from Mindfull Decision Making
Scoop.it!

What's Better for Business: Logic or Emotion? Answers From Neuroscience - Forbes

What's Better for Business: Logic or Emotion? Answers From Neuroscience - Forbes | Intuition | Scoop.it

Humans are animals.  While we like to think we’re captains of our destiny, we’re far more driven by instinct than we know.  In many ways, we’re just glorified apes, even in business.

 

For over a century, the overriding philosophy in business has been that rational decision-making is better business. Irrational decisions, on the other hand, were to be avoided.  We’ve probably all seen bad executive decisions made based on miscalculated fears, misperceived threats, or misdirected loyalties.

Today, science is teaching us that the bifurcation between logic and emotion is not so clear cut.  There is business value lurking in what appears to be irrational.  Think of the intense devotion of startup teams in Silicon Valley.  Think of the culture that surrounds iconic companies like Harley-Davidson.  Think of the passion of Apple fans camping out overnight to be first in line to buy a new product. Given what science is revealing about the human brain, what are the implications for business?  Janet Crawford is one of the world’s pioneers in applying neuroscience to business.  Her firm, Cascadance, leverages biological design to improve individual and team performance.  I’ve had the honor of working with her in creating Rainforest Architects, a workshop to train leaders on how to spark their innovation ecosystem by applying techniques from Silicon Valley. Below is part 1 of an extended conversation with Janet.  Over the course of this discussion, we dig into human nature, explore how biology affects innovation, and give you practical tips to increase the innovation in your ecosystem....


Via David Hain, Philippe Vallat
more...
Laura Goodrich's comment, April 3, 2013 6:27 PM
Yes, a blend of both is powerful Tom Wojick
Cris Popp's curator insight, April 4, 2013 6:26 PM

I think you do better in life, and at work, if you accept that better than 85% of our behaviours are driven by unconscious drivers.  You just have to look at politics to see that often, decisions are made first, and justified afterwards.  This is fine when you're making a decision just for yourself – but if you're making decisions that affect others, they need to be made from a more rational basis.
This is especially the case, when through technology, a leader can have a much longer lever of control and reach over others.  That reach ranges from beiong as small as authority over someone elses job adn job happiness, all the way to the leaders of North Korea and the nuclear threat they wield over millions of people.
This is why, leaders especially, need to be aware of their own motives, and drivers, and to be humble about their perspective.  Their decsions may be perfectly rational - they need to accept they may not.  When I judge leaders, this capacity is one of the most important factors that I use.

Cris Popp's comment, August 29, 2013 6:48 PM
I agree Tom, it's about how to use both, And how to use each to develop the other. For example , testing your gut feel to see how accurate it is.
Rescooped by Thomas Menk from ideeeee
Scoop.it!

3 Simple Exercises To Develop Your Intuition (Video)

3 Simple Exercises To Develop Your Intuition (Video) | Intuition | Scoop.it

Fact: You already know what you have to do. Question: Do you have the courage to trust your inner guidance? Here are a few exercises and questions to help you tap into your inner wisdom and develop your intuition!


Via Lukas Wullimann
more...
Philippe Trebaul's curator insight, February 22, 2013 9:59 AM
3 exercices simples pour développer votre intuition (Vidéo)


"Fait: Vous savez déjà ce que vous avez à faire.Question: Avez-vous le courage de faire confiance à votre guide intérieur? Voici quelques exercices et des questions pour vous aider à puiser dans votre sagesse intérieure et développer votre intuition!"


3 Simple Exercises To Develop Your Intuition (Video) via @tmenk http://sco.lt/...


Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

5 Signs That You're Making The Right Decision

5 Signs That You're Making The Right Decision | Intuition | Scoop.it


When it comes to making big decisions -- "Should we break up or be together?" "Should I go into debt to attend a private college?" -- you might find yourself going back and forth, overanalyzing until you drive yourself (and everyone else around you) crazy. When something matters so much to you, is it even possible to make an informed choice? The key to making good decisions is balancing following your heart, or intuition, and listening to your head (logic and reason). Although you can never be sure of all the future outcomes of a big decision, nor should you try to be, one thing is certain: Nothing is worse than remaining in a state of indecision. Click through the slideshow below for five signs that you've chosen the right path.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

Intuitive Decision-Making Based on Expertise May Deliver Better Results Than Analytical Approach

Intuitive Decision-Making Based on Expertise May Deliver Better Results Than Analytical Approach | Intuition | Scoop.it
Intuition may be just as effective in decision-making as an analytical approach — and sometimes more efficient and effective, depending on the decision-maker's level of expertise on the subject at had, according to a new report in the Journal of Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes by researchers from Boston College, George Mason University and Rice University.

“It turns out intuition isn’t always bad and there are conditions where it is a good way to make the right decision,” said co-author Michael Pratt, the O’Connor Family Professor of Management and Organization at Boston College’s Carroll School of Management. “What we found demystifies a lot of the information out there that says intuition isn’t as effective as if you sat down and walked through an analytical approach.”

Testing intuition against analysis, Pratt and co-authors Erik Dane, of Rice University and Kevin W. Rockmann, of George Mason, found that people can trust their gut and rely on intuition when making a broad evaluation – one that doesn’t include a subset of additional decisions – in an area where they have in-depth knowledge of the subject, also referred to as domain expertise.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

The Imprecision of Intuition

Managers often think they have a good handle on who their best customers are. But the truth is, their intuition is often at odds with reality, says Jonathan Bein, senior partner of Real Results Marketing. Managers often think they have a good handle on who their best customers are. But the truth is, their intuition is often at odds with reality, says Jonathan Bein, senior partner of Real Results Marketing.

The problem is that "intuition is imprecise" and often based on outdated information, Bein says in the recent MDM Webcast, Data into Dollars. Your company has likely faced changes in the business climate – both up and down over the past few years. And that may have shifted your sweet spot, where your best or most profitable customers are. "The sweet spot from 2008 is not the sweet spot from 2010 which is probably not the sweet spot from 2012," he says.

Another issue is that top executives likely only see the largest customers; they don't spend much time with smaller customers and, as such, can miss purchasing patterns that may be occurring in areas outside of the intuitive sweet spot......
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas Menk
Scoop.it!

Why Too Much Data Disables Your Decision Making

Why Too Much Data Disables Your Decision Making | Intuition | Scoop.it

 

Quick, think back to a major decision. You know, the kind that compelled you to read everything on a topic and lead you to spend hours devouring every last scrap of data.

 

How'd that work out for you?

We like to think that more information drives smarter decisions; that the more details we absorb, the better off we'll be. It's why we subscribe to Google Alerts, cling to our iPhone, and fire up our TweetDeck. Knowledge, we're told, is power. But what if our thirst for data is actually holding us back? What if obsessing over information actually reduces the quality of our decisions?

That's the question raised by Princeton and Stanford University psychologists in a fascinating study titled On the Pursuit and Misuse of Useless Information. Their experiment was simple. Participants were divided into two groups. Group 1 read the following: Imagine that you are a loan officer at a bank reviewing the mortgage application of a recent college graduate with a stable, well-paying job and a solid credit history. The applicant seems qualified, but during the routine credit check you discover that for the last three months the applicant has not paid a $5,000 debt to his charge card account......

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Philippe Vallat
Scoop.it!

American Friends of Tel Aviv University: Going with Your Gut

American Friends of Tel Aviv University: Going with Your Gut | Intuition | Scoop.it

 

Decision-making is an inevitable part of the human experience, and one of the most mysterious. For centuries, scientists have studied how we go about the difficult task of choosing A or B, left or right, North or South — and how both instinct and intellect figure into the process. Now new research indicates that the old truism "look before you leap" may be less true than previously thought.In a behavioral experiment, Prof. Marius Usher of Tel Aviv University's School of Psychological Sciences and his fellow researchers found that intuition was a surprisingly powerful and accurate tool. When forced to choose between two options based on instinct alone, the participants made the right call up to 90 percent of the time. The results of their study were recently published in the journal PNAS....

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Thomas Menk from Kreativitätsdenken
Scoop.it!

The Science of Magical Thinking

The Science of Magical Thinking | Intuition | Scoop.it


By magical thinking I mean the kind of thinking that uses both empirical and non-empirical sources to achieve extraordinary results. I admit that “magical thinking” is not a great term for what I was writing about in The 2012 Election and the Super-Conscious Mind. In that post, I wrote that many people saw the contribution of magical thinking to the election victory of Barack Obama. Magical thinking in that instance meant thinking that is not confined to seeking knowledge from the “seen” universe, but also from the unseen. By unseen I do not mean the world of emotions – love, hate, fear, etc. To my mind emotions are elements generated from the seen universe. By unseen I am referring to the unified field of forces that scientists now confirm that the seen universe is enfolded and entangled in, and generated from. It is the world of subatomic elementary particles -- fundamental fermions and the fundamental bosons, which are the building blocks of the seen universe, but also exist in the infinite, invisible field that engulfs the seen universe. The unified field is also composed of fundamental forces --electromagnetism, strong nuclear force, weak nuclear force, and gravitation. These forces are the ways that fundamental particles interact with each other in the field. Since the seen world is part of the field (the manifested part of it), these forces act on the seen world. But we are certainly very far from knowing exactly how.

 

Magical thinking is in my definition any human attempt to get at the inexact how. In this scheme, hunches, gut feelings, intuitions, and premonitions give us information on the inexact how. We cannot trust that information in the way that we trust the information that comes from observations of the seen universe; but the information is not totally useless.....

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Thomas Menk from Weiterbildung
Scoop.it!

Bauchgefühl: Der Super-Ratgeber Intuition?

Bauchgefühl: Der Super-Ratgeber Intuition? | Intuition | Scoop.it


A oder B? Rechts oder links? Entschlüsse zu fassen, ist eine der schwierigsten Aufgaben. Das Bauchgefühl sei aber in vielen Fällen der richtige Ratgeber und die getroffenen Entscheidungen seien oft überraschend gut, fanden Forscher von der Tel Aviv University's School of Psychological Science. http://www.aftau.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&amp;id=17369

 


Via Sascha Reimann
more...
No comment yet.