Introduction to World Geography
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Weathering Continued - Chemical and Biological Weathering ...

Weathering Continued - Chemical and Biological Weathering ... | Introduction to World Geography | Scoop.it
This post deals with chemical and biological weathering, following our earlier post on mechanical weathering.

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Roslinda Chan's curator insight, January 17, 2013 8:55 PM

Nice photo of Limestone pavement with clints and grikes

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Mine landslide will hurt Utah economy in short term; company will run out of copper in months

Mine landslide will hurt Utah economy in short term; company will run out of copper in months | Introduction to World Geography | Scoop.it
SALT LAKE CITY - The landslide that washed over the terraced steps of a mining pit nearly a mile deep left only the tip of one giant electric-powered shovel poking out of the dirt

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Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson's curator insight, April 29, 2013 10:12 AM

Company officials say 165 million tons of waste rock and dirt slid down a wall of the pit. They have said they expected it for months and kept workers away that very day.

 
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Erosion in Action

News 8 chief photojournalist Kevyn Fowler captured a road collapsing in Freeport, Maine during a storm.

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Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:53 PM

Erosion in Action | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Shelby Porter's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:23 PM

Normally we see erosion on a piece of land over a long period of time. In this short video, we see what erosion can do to in mere minutes. It is scary to think how much the roads we drive on are eroding right underneath our cars. It is amazing how much the environment around us can change due to the weather. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:30 AM
This video is crazy! It shows the erosion of a road during a storm. The water was supposed to run under the road and flow through a large pipe. As you can see after watching the video the road eventually erodes and then the pipe begins to bouy up and down. Later the road is completely deteriorated and the pipe ran down the river with the rest of the road.
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Top 20 Earth Images

Top 20 Earth Images | Introduction to World Geography | Scoop.it
With five satellites scanning the globe, DigitalGlobe has collected impressive imagery of planet Earth this year. Check out their top 20 images here.

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Alex Schaerer's curator insight, December 5, 2013 11:50 AM

Incredible images of Mother Earth. It is all of our responsibility to look past our short term existence here to ensure that she flourishes for millenia for our future generations. 

Joy Kinley's curator insight, December 6, 2013 10:49 AM

The views of Earth from Space are fascinating.  Mountains, deserts, volcanoes, islands all seen from above.  My favorite is the city of Aleppo. What is yours?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:31 PM
Five satellites have taken some of the most amazing photos of amazing places all over the world. The photos show the beauty of each place some places i never even knew existed.
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There’s a plan to split California into 6 states. Here’s what it might look like.

There’s a plan to split California into 6 states. Here’s what it might look like. | Introduction to World Geography | Scoop.it
Demographics, money, and voting representation for something that will never happen.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 16, 2014 6:41 AM

In addition to this Washington Post article, this NPR article also shows some of the ramifications of this proposal.  While it's impossible, the idea brings up fascinating "what ifs." 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:01 PM

APHG-U4

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, September 17, 2014 2:00 PM

Noting that this will never happen, because even if the people of California put it to a vote, it would have to be endorsed in Congress, This plays into the study we had to do in class about segmenting the nation into regions. There is a distinct feel to each of these regions in California. There is a feeling of place to each region. “Jefferson” feels like it’s on a different planet from “South California.” Racial make up, economic disparity, political culture and geography are so different that it’s hard to believe you are in the same place.

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Wegener and Continental Drift Theory

Wegener and Continental Drift Theory | Introduction to World Geography | Scoop.it
Early reactions and criticisms of continental drift theory with comparison of Alfred Wegener's experiences to Darwin's and Galileo's.
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(EN) - Plate Tectonics Glossary | The Geological Society

(EN) - Plate Tectonics Glossary | The Geological Society | Introduction to World Geography | Scoop.it

"The surface of the Earth is broken up into large plates. It’s easy to confuse these plates with the Earth’s crust – the thin outermost layer of the Earth. But there is more to the structure of the Earth than this simple image of a ‘cracked egg-shell’.

 

The Earth’s layers can be defined in two different ways – based on the chemical composition or the mechanical properties of the rock. To understand what plates are, it is important to understand both of ..."


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Michelle Winemiller's curator insight, January 22, 2015 12:07 PM

this article will be of particular value so that students are provided with the actual lithospheric plate locations on Earth

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Pangaea and Plate Tectonics

The supercontinent Pangaea, with its connected South America and Africa, broke apart 200 million years ago. But the continents haven't stopped shifting -- the tectonic plates beneath our feet (in Earth's two top layers, the lithosphere and the asthenosphere) are still traveling at about the rate your fingernails grow. Michael Molina discusses the catalysts and consequences of continental drift.


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 2:03 PM

Plate tectonics have alot to do with the world and how the world will evolve and in which way it will tranform in specific places. Pangaea involves not only Africa but also South America and how they broke away from the rest of the contenents about 200 million years ago. This idea involves the reality that the continents never stop shifting and the top two layer's of the Earth still grow at the rate of our finger nails grow. Divergent and Convergent boundries are apparent in the Earths ability to shift and eith come together or dive apart.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, November 26, 2014 4:55 PM

Very interesting that the earth has changed and continues to change. The continents have been separated over time and the example is there as Michael Molina explains that the continents of Africa and South America were once united as they have found remains of dinosaurs in eastern South America and West Africa.

April Howard's curator insight, February 13, 2015 1:36 PM

Visual Explanation of Pangaea and Plate Tectonics

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Hands-on with 80 Days, the Jules Verne-inspired steampunk adventure book

Hands-on with 80 Days, the Jules Verne-inspired steampunk adventure book | Introduction to World Geography | Scoop.it

Adapted from Jules Verne's classic novel, Around the World in 80 Days, Inkle's latest interactive adventure will put you in the role of long-suffering servant Jean Passepartout, plotting a route to circumnavigate the globe as fast as possible, avoiding misfortunes, pirates and policeman along the way. Release date : July 31st.


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Stunning Map Reveals World's Earthquakes Since 1898

Stunning Map Reveals World's Earthquakes Since 1898 | Introduction to World Geography | Scoop.it

If you've ever wondered where — and why — earthquakes happen the most, look no further than a new map, which plots more than a century's worth of nearly every recorded earthquake strong enough to at least rattle the bookshelves.

 

The map shows earthquakes of magnitude 4.0 or greater since 1898; each is marked in a lightning-bug hue that glows brighter with increasing magnitude.

 

The overall effect is both beautiful and arresting, revealing the silhouettes of Earth's tectonic boundaries in stark, luminous swarms of color. 

 

The map's maker, John Nelson, the user experience and mapping manager for IDV Solutions, a data visualization company, said the project offered several surprises.

 

"First, I was surprised by the sheer amount of earthquakes that have been recorded," Nelson told OurAmazingPlanet. "It's almost like you could walk from Seattle to Wellington [New Zealand] if these things were floating in the ocean, and I wouldn't have expected that."

 

In all, 203,186 earthquakes are marked on the map, which is current through 2003. And it reveals the story of plate tectonics itself.

 

The long volcanic seams where Earth's crust is born appear as faint, snaking lines cutting through the world's oceans. The earthquakes along these so-called spreading centers tend to be rather mild. The best studied spreading center, called the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, bisects the Atlantic Ocean, on the right side of the image.

 

Its Pacific counterpart wanders along the eastern edge of the Pacific Ocean, cutting a wide swath offshore of South America. Another spreading center makes a jog though the Indian Ocean and up through the Red Sea.

But one glance at the map shows that the real earthquake action is elsewhere. Subduction zones, the places where tectonic plates overlap and one is forced to dive deep beneath the other and into the Earth's crushing interior — a process that generates the biggest earthquakes on the planet — stand out like a Vegas light show.

 

Nelson said this concept hit home particularly for the Ring of Fire, the vast line of subduction zones around the northern and western edge of the Pacific Ocean.

 

"I have a general sense of where it is, and a notion of plate tectonics, but when I first pulled the data in and started painting it in geographically, it was magnificent," Nelson said. "I was awestruck at how rigid those bands of earthquake activity really are."


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Ari Meier's curator insight, September 9, 2013 3:34 PM

This is amazing.

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40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World

40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World | Introduction to World Geography | Scoop.it
  If you're a visual learner like myself, then you know maps, charts and infographics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this c...

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Olivier Aidyn's curator insight, August 16, 2013 12:44 AM

good work dude

Olivier Aidyn's comment, August 16, 2013 9:10 AM
Such a great infographics !
mtmeme's curator insight, August 16, 2013 10:31 AM

These are amazing!

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Washington State Landslide Destroys Home, Threatens Others - other global landsides as well.

Washington State Landslide Destroys Home, Threatens Others - other global landsides as well. | Introduction to World Geography | Scoop.it
SEATTLE — Some residents evacuated from hillside homes on Washington state's Whidbey Island after a large landslide are being told they can return, now that geologists have taken a preliminary look at the area.

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Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson's curator insight, March 29, 2013 7:51 AM

This is not isolated incident. - this has hitten the globe with severe weather conditions. - this article page shows other news and coverage in the video section of other landslides.

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Idol Rock – Nature’s Balancing Act

Idol Rock – Nature’s Balancing Act | Introduction to World Geography | Scoop.it
The 50-acre expanse of Brimham Moor in North Yorkshire, England is home to a number of curious rock formations shaped by tens of thousands of years of erosion, but the most impressive of all is Idol Rock, a 200-ton monolith balancing on a tiny...

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CineversityTV's curator insight, August 22, 2013 10:46 AM

but it looks great.

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Erosion: The White Cliffs of Dover

Erosion: The White Cliffs of Dover | Introduction to World Geography | Scoop.it
Thousands of tons of chalk from the famous White Cliffs of Dover have collapsed into the sea following a huge rockfall.

 

An excellent example of erosion and the processes that have shaped an iconic landscape.  The accompanying article has numerous pictures from a variety of angles that truly tell the story.   


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 10:41 AM

The White Cliffs of Dover serve as an natural icon for England. The cliffs are composed of chalk, giving them their white milky appearance. During the Cretaceous period, calcium carbonate from small coccolithophores and other phytoplanktons deposited on the bottom of the ocean and over time turned into chalk. While these cliffs have stood the test of time, it is important to remember that landscapes are always changing, especially now with drastic climate change. With increased amounts of erosion, weather anomalies, and acid rain, it will be interesting to see how some of these iconic landscapes are affected.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 1, 9:21 AM

Geoworld 7 NSW
Chapter 1: Distinctive landforms and geomorphic processes
1.11 Coastal landforms: erosion
1.12 coastal landforms: deposition
1.13 Coastal management: role play
1.14 Skill: Line drawing and field sketching ( coastal)
1.11 Skill: Port Campbell coastline
Geothink: Coastal fieldwork

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Spheres of the Earth - NASA's Student Guide


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James Battaglia's curator insight, October 29, 2013 4:02 AM

Comment: This resource is a great way for students to monitor their own progress on their understanding of the Earth’s spheres. It is a workbook produced by NASA that walks students through their own research of the Earth’s spheres. This resource would be great for students as they can move through the workbook at their own speed in order to supplement what they learn in class about the spheres, this was they don’t feel pressured to have deep understanding of the content at the same time as other students. This could be a hand in assessment task for students, where they must complete the workbook by a set date to have their work assessed. This would be a good task for students as it is fairly straight forward and students shouldn’t be confused by the task. The task will help students develop their scientific literacy skills as there is a section dedicated to students making observations, developing hypotheses, as well as directing students to explain their observations. Additionally, this resource supports the development of scientific literacy as there is a section for individual research, where students would have to research the four spheres and comment on the validity and reliability of their sources.

 

Justification: This resource is good as it allows students to revise for the topic at their own pace, an ideal that can be good to engage students, as often students who fall behind in the content will start to disengage with any subsequent material. The resource is great for promoting inquiry based thinking as it is an individual task that gets students to research in their own way, as it gives students autonomy in how they complete the workbook (e.g. choosing what natural disaster to look at). The strength of this resource is that it encompasses many of the factors required to help student develop their scientific skill set (e.g. researching, hypothesising, using and handling data) in a way that is simple, straight forward and easily grasped by students. Additionally, the resource has links to NASA’s website where students can investigate various videos and images that can further engage the students. A weakness of the resource is that it is quite text dominate at the start as it explains to students how to effectively use the workbook and how to navigate the website. This could cause students to disengage with the resource before the more engaging material begins. 

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The Landforms of the Seven Continents | eHow

The Landforms of the Seven Continents | eHow | Introduction to World Geography | Scoop.it
Landforms are the natural physical features of the earth’s terrain. They can range from very small in size, such as the grooves on rock surfaces, to the massive mountain ranges and ocean basins. All seven continents are home to many distinct landforms, such as mountains, plains and rivers.

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(EN) - An A to Z Glossary of Landform Vocabulary Words With Definitions & Examples | brighthubeducation.com

(EN) - An A to Z Glossary of Landform Vocabulary Words With Definitions & Examples | brighthubeducation.com | Introduction to World Geography | Scoop.it

"Time to study for your geography or history test? Need ideas for a story setting? Unsure what to call that earthen structure you spotted in a national park? Use this list of landform vocabulary words to help you with all of your geography and topography needs.

Landforms, features which make up the Earth’s surface, vary widely around the world. From deserts to glaciers, canyons to continents, islands to swamps, you can learn a lot from your local landforms. From climate to the crops grown locally, landforms play a huge role in how humans live and function on the planet. The more we understand these landform vocabulary words, the easier it is to understand the world around us."


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Stefano KaliFire's curator insight, August 6, 2014 12:40 PM

Seen on: inboxtranslation.com

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Alfred Wegener: Great Minds

Hank introduces us to Alfred Wegener, a voraciously curious guy who proposed the original theory of continental drift - and was laughed at for it. Like SciSh...

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Plate tectonics modelled realistically

Plate tectonics modelled realistically | Introduction to World Geography | Scoop.it
Swiss scientists have for the first time succeeded in realistically simulating how an oceanic plate sinks of its own accord under an adjacent plate.

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▶ DBQ Essays for Dummies - How to Write a DBQ - YouTube

HipHughes takes you through essential advice for writing the notorious Document Based Essay. 5 tips which will make terrible writers mediocre, mediocre write...

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Longitude and Latitude

http://www.eutoxita.com/ This is my follow-up to "5 Themes of Geography". I'm teaching science now but my friend & colleague requested something to help stud... (Longitude and Latitude.
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2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | Introduction to World Geography | Scoop.it

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:00 PM

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:21 PM

A straightforward map that puts previous knowledge (of the rapidly growing population and the limited food supply) into prescriptive. -UNIT 2