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Evolution of Man - YouTube

Mulitmedia project detailing the stages in the evolution of man. From monkey to homo sapiens
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Early humans were more advanced than we thought | The Westside ...

Early humans were more advanced than we thought | The Westside ... | Intro to History and Early Man | Scoop.it
Researchers at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History have discovered that early humans were less primitive than we originally thought. According to a new study, early hominids were able to create tools and ...
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A look at future Human evolution, what we might look like and how we have already changed.

The future of human beings Homo sapiens, the name for you, myself and ever human being that exists on our planet, we evolved from Africa about 200000 years ...
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History in the News

History in the News | Intro to History and Early Man | Scoop.it

Via Carla Saunders, Clare Treloar
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Carla Saunders's curator insight, February 7, 2013 3:13 AM

Lots of sources here - Active History does it again http://www.activehistory.co.uk/

Clare Treloar's curator insight, February 15, 2013 6:10 AM

Sources recommended

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Welcome to The Ancient Web - The Ancient World's Great Civilizations

Welcome to The Ancient Web - The Ancient World's Great Civilizations | Intro to History and Early Man | Scoop.it

Via Clare Treloar
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Clare Treloar's curator insight, April 4, 2013 10:14 PM

an interesting portal to explore

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Secondary Sources: What Are They? | Teachinghistory.org

Secondary Sources: What Are They? | Teachinghistory.org | Intro to History and Early Man | Scoop.it

What are secondary sources? Secondary sources are works of synthesis and interpretation based upon primary sources and the work of other authors. They may take a variety of forms. The authors of secondary sources develop their interpretations and narratives of events based on primary sources, that is, documents and other evidence created by participants or eyewitnesses.


Via Maree Whiteley
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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, May 8, 2013 12:21 PM

Thinking historically...

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Primary Sources: What Are They? | Teachinghistory.org

Primary Sources: What Are They? | Teachinghistory.org | Intro to History and Early Man | Scoop.it

Via Maree Whiteley
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Western Asia, Empires 5000 Years Time Lapse Map

An animated time lapse of Western Asia and the expansion of its Imperial Empires over the last 5000 years. From: http://www.mapsofwar.com/

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China axes 'show ancient writing'

China axes 'show ancient writing' | Intro to History and Early Man | Scoop.it

Fragments of two ancient stone axes found in China could display some of the world's earliest primitive writing, Chinese archaeologists say.


Via Maree Whiteley
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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, July 11, 2013 8:58 AM
AC History Year 7- Ancient China.
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Neanderthals shared speech and language with modern humans, study suggests

Neanderthals shared speech and language with modern humans, study suggests | Intro to History and Early Man | Scoop.it

Fast-accumulating data seem to indicate that our close cousins, the Neanderthals, were much more similar to us than imagined even a decade ago. But did they have anything like modern speech and language? And if so, what are the implications for understanding present-day linguistic diversity? The MPI for Psycholinguistics researchers Dan Dediu and Stephen C. Levinson argue in their paper in Frontiers in Language Sciences that modern language and speech can be traced back to the last common ancestor we shared with the Neandertals roughly half a million years ago.

 

The Neanderthals have fascinated both the academic world and the general public ever since their discovery almost 200 years ago. Initially thought to be subhuman brutes incapable of anything but the most primitive of grunts, they were a successful form of humanity inhabiting vast swathes of western Eurasia for several hundreds of thousands of years, during harsh ages and milder interglacial periods. We knew that they were our closest cousins, sharing a common ancestor with us around half a million years ago (probably Homo heidelbergensis), but it was unclear what their cognitive capacities were like, or why modern humans succeeded in replacing them after thousands of years of cohabitation. Recently, due to new palaeoanthropological and archaeological discoveries and the reassessment of older data, but especially to the availability of ancient DNA, we have started to realise that their fate was much more intertwined with ours and that, far from being slow brutes, their cognitive capacities and culture were comparable to ours.


Dediu and Levinson review all these strands of literature and argue that essentially modern language and speech are an ancient feature of our lineage dating back at least to the most recent ancestor we shared with the Neanderthals and the Denisovans (another form of humanity known mostly from their genome). Their interpretation of the intrinsically ambiguous and scant evidence goes against the scenario usually assumed by most language scientists, namely that of a sudden and recent emergence of modernity, presumably due to a single – or very few – genetic mutations. This pushes back the origins of modern language by a factor of 10 from the often-cited 50 or so thousand years, to around a million years ago – somewhere between the origins of our genus, Homo, some 1.8 million years ago, and the emergence of Homo heidelbergensis. This reassessment of the evidence goes against a saltationist scenario where a single catastrophic mutation in a single individual would suddenly give rise to language, and suggests that a gradual accumulation of biological and cultural innovations is much more plausible.

 

Interestingly, given that we know from the archaeological record and recent genetic data that the modern humans spreading out of Africa interacted both genetically and culturally with the Neanderthals and Denisovans, then just as our bodies carry around some of their genes, maybe our languages preserve traces of their languages too. This would mean that at least some of the observed linguistic diversity is due to these ancient encounters, an idea testable by comparing the structural properties of the African and non-African languages, and by detailed computer simulations of language spread.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Previously Unknown Population Explosion of Human Species 40,000 Years Ago Discovered

Previously Unknown Population Explosion of Human Species 40,000 Years Ago Discovered | Intro to History and Early Man | Scoop.it
DNA sequencing of 36 complete Y chromosomes has uncovered a previously unknown population explosion that occurred 40 to 50 thousand years ago, between the first expansion of modern humans out of Africa 60 to 70 thousand years ago and the Neolithic expansions of people in several parts of the world starting 10 thousand years ago. This is the first time researchers have used the information from large-scale DNA sequencing to create an accurate family tree of the Y chromosome, from which the inferences about human population history could be made.

 

"We have always considered the expansion of humans out of Africa as being the largest population expansion of modern humans, but our research questions this theory," says Ms Wei Wei, first author from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the West China University of Medical Sciences. "The out-of-Africa expansion, which happened approximately 60,000 years ago, was extremely large in geographical terms with humans spreading around the globe. Now we've found a second wave of expansion that is much larger in terms of human population growth and occurred over a very short period, somewhere between 40,000 to 50,000 years ago."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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DocsTeach

TY! Awesome primary/secondary sources history! MT@lhesterman National Archives http://t.co/5dVWCnWLMa AND http://t.co/bybHFzye31 #SSchat
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New Primate Fossils Support "Out of Africa" Theory

Researchers have discovered fossilized remains of two previously unknown, monkeylike species that lived 37 million years ago.
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History of the World in Seven Minutes - YouTube

An introduction video provided by World History For Us All.
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10 Weird Facts about Human Evolution

We've gone from living in trees to living on YouTube in just a few millennia. We explore the weird and wonderful facts behind human evolution Music = Blowgun...
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Teaching with Primary Sources | Edspace - Education - KQED

Teaching with Primary Sources | Edspace - Education - KQED | Intro to History and Early Man | Scoop.it
Grades 4-12 | Society & Culture | Teaching with Primary Sources This interactive scrapbook invites students to reconstruct the journey of 1962 high schooler Jane Morton as she travels with her school band from the Midwest to ...
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Laconic History of the World

Laconic History of the World | Intro to History and Early Man | Scoop.it

Via #histedchat -very cool graphic of modern history


Via Carla Saunders, Clare Treloar
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Primary and Secondary Sources through Video | Teachinghistory.org

Primary and Secondary Sources through Video | Teachinghistory.org | Intro to History and Early Man | Scoop.it

Here are several high-quality online videos that teach about primary and secondary sources—and historical thinking more broadly—to get you started.What is Historical Thinking?

Watch Teachinghistory.org's introductory video on historical thinking to learn about primary sources and strategies for analyzing them.


Via Maree Whiteley
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5 Tools For Making Custom Timelines - Edudemic

5 Tools For Making Custom Timelines - Edudemic | Intro to History and Early Man | Scoop.it

You can use custom timelines in book reports, projects, and just about every other piece of coursework in K-12. These tools will help.


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TimeMaps

TimeMaps | Intro to History and Early Man | Scoop.it
TimeMaps Interactive History Maps, World History Atlas, Lesson Plans and a blog about world history.

Via Maree Whiteley
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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, May 11, 2013 2:01 PM
TimeMaps: Resources to support teaching and learning Teacher Support - ideas for using the TimeMap of World History with your students Topic TimeMaps - great classroom resources to bring history topics alive! 
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MyHistro

MyHistro | Intro to History and Early Man | Scoop.it

This wonderful tool matches maps, text, imagery and timelines, what more could you want? MyHistro.com Click here or on the image to see the interactive version. In a way the use of this tool would ...


Via Maree Whiteley
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Getting Kids Engaged with Primary Sources | Cool Tools by Richard Byrne | The Digital Shift

Getting Kids Engaged with Primary Sources | Cool Tools by Richard Byrne | The Digital Shift | Intro to History and Early Man | Scoop.it

"I vividly remember being disappointed during my first year of teaching: my students weren’t nearly as excited about primary source documents as I was. Primary source documents, as you know, offer readers a unique, real-world perspective, and I thought my kids would love delving into them. I soon learned that my disappointing results weren’t due to the documents that I’d selected, but rather how I was having students use them. That first year, they weren’t doing anything but reading them. Today, Web-based tools enable students to discover more primary sources than ever before and engage them in dynamic ways. The following items are some of my favorites."


Via John Evans
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Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, April 23, 2013 2:46 PM

using primary scources in the correct way is extreemly important. Thanks for the links to some useful sites.

Casey Hugh McNealy's curator insight, July 9, 2013 3:47 PM

This site provides links to useful websites along with analysis guides and quizzes for analyzing primary sources.

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Earlier Neandertal demise suggested by redating using more precise carbon dating

Earlier Neandertal demise suggested by redating using more precise carbon dating | Intro to History and Early Man | Scoop.it

The story of the Neandertals may need a new ending, a controversial study suggests. Using improved radiocarbon methods, scientists redated two of the youngest known Neandertal cave sites and concluded that they are at least 10,000 years older than previous studies have found.

 

The findings cast doubt on the reliability of radiocarbon dates from other recent Neandertal sites, the researchers suggest online February 4, 2013, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. This means the last Neandertals might have died out much earlier than previously thought, which could cause anthropologists to rethink how and why these hominids vanished. Researchers have long debated whether the harsh Ice Age climate, the appearance of modern humans migrating out of Africa, or some other factor drove Neandertals to extinction.

 

“The paper is simply excellent,” says archaeologist Olaf Jöris of the Romano-Germanic Central Museum in Mainz, Germany. The new research supports Jöris’ own review of Neandertal dates, in which he concluded that the most-recent Neandertals probably lived around 42,000 years ago. The standard view suggests that the last of these hominids occupied Europe as recently as about 28,000 years ago.

 

But other archaeologists are not convinced by the new work. “We shouldn’t get too carried away over results that amount to a few radiocarbon dates from two sites,” says Paul Pettitt, an archaeologist at Durham University in England.

ENLARGE This Neandertal jaw from a cave in southern Spain may be at least 10,000 years older than previously estimated, a new dating analysis suggests. 

Over the last couple of decades, archaeologists have determined that the Iberian Peninsula was one of the last Neandertal refuges. Neandertals throughout much of Europe appear to have gone extinct around the same time that modern humans reached the continent, at least 42,000 years ago. But the favorable climate of southern Spain and Gibraltar may have helped Neandertals hang on in for another 10,000 years or so. Getting a precise chronology is crucial to understanding what factors played a role in the Neandertals’ demise and the degree to which Neandertals and humans interacted and possibly interbred, researchers say.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Vloasis's curator insight, June 4, 2013 1:34 AM

This 10k year correction in dating makes me wonder what things we believe as fact now may later be proven to be significantly off.

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Out of Africa, the skull and the museum guide - The Independent

Out of Africa, the skull and the museum guide - The Independent | Intro to History and Early Man | Scoop.it
The Independent Out of Africa, the skull and the museum guide The Independent In 1921 at Broken Hill in Northern Rhodesia, now Zambia, miners unearthed a skull that would, at last, provide hard evidence that Darwin was right to suggest human beings...
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