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21 Science Fictions That Became Science Facts In 2013

21 Science Fictions That Became Science Facts In 2013 | Intresting | Scoop.it
If only Isaac Asimov could see us now. There's an old saying that science fiction is really just predicting — or helping prevent — the future.
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Powerful tool for genetic engineering

Powerful tool for genetic engineering | Intresting | Scoop.it

Viruses cannot only cause illnesses in humans, they also infect bacteria. Those protect themselves with a kind of 'immune system' which -- simply put -- consists of specific sequences in the genetic material of the bacteria and a suitable enzyme. It detects foreign DNA, which may originate from a virus, cuts it up and thus makes the invaders harmless.
Scientists from the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI) in Braunschweig have now shown that the dual-RNA guided enzyme Cas9, which is involved in the process, has developed independently in various strains of bacteria. This enhances the potential of exploiting the bacterial immune system for genome engineering.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Proof that the PSP is dead?

Proof that the PSP is dead? | Intresting | Scoop.it

PowerShell adds console-style controls to your iPhone or iPod Touch, and a built-in battery doubles the power capacity of your iPhone.


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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:42 PM

This iPhone game controller looks like a pretty neat accessory for serious gamers, integrating controls with additional battery. My gaming is mostly on the iPad though so I think I'll pass.


But if we needed signs that the iOS platform is killing the PSP and other portable game consoles, this is a very concrete one.

Muriel Hug's curator insight, January 15, 2014 6:23 AM

Bah voilà ..

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Astronomers reveal contents of mysterious black hole jets

Astronomers reveal contents of mysterious black hole jets | Intresting | Scoop.it
An international team of astronomers has answered a long-standing question about the enigmatic jets emitted by black holes. Jets are narrow beams of matter spat out at high speed from near a central object, like a black hole.

 

Jets are narrow beams of matter spat out at high speed from near a central object, like a black hole. "Although they have been observed for decades, we're still not sure what they are made of, or what powers them," ESO astronomer Dr María Díaz Trigo, lead author of the study, said.

 

The team studied the radio waves and X-rays emitted by a small black hole a few times the mass of the Sun. The black hole in question was known to be active, but the team's radio observations did not show any jets, and the X-ray spectrum didn't reveal anything unusual.

 

However, a few weeks later, the team took another look and this time saw radio emissions corresponding to the sudden appearance of these jets, and even more interestingly, lines had appeared in the X-ray spectrum -- the tell-tale signature of ordinary atoms -- around the black hole.

 

"Intriguingly, we found the lines were not where they should be, but rather were shifted significantly," Dr James Miller Jones from the Curtin University node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), who led the radio observations, said.

 

The same effect occurs when a siren from a vehicle changes pitch as it moves towards or away from us, as the sound wave is shortened or lengthened by the movement.

 

"It led us to conclude the particles were being accelerated to fast speeds in the jets, one directed towards Earth, and the other one in the opposite direction," team member Dr Simone Migliari from the University of Barcelona said.

 

Dr Miller-Jones said this is the first strong evidence of such particles in jets from a typical small black hole. "We've known for a long time that jets contain electrons, but haven't got an overall negative charge, so there must be something positively charged in them too," Dr Miller Jones said.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Don't Take Federal Science for Granted (Op-Ed) - LiveScience.com

Don't Take Federal Science for Granted (Op-Ed) - LiveScience.com | Intresting | Scoop.it
Don't Take Federal Science for Granted (Op-Ed)
LiveScience.com
The impact of shuttering federal science for 16 days may not be immediately obvious to many Americans, at least not as obvious as closing national parks or Smithsonian museums.
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Keep the mornings honest, the afternoons for lying and cheating

Keep the mornings honest, the afternoons for lying and cheating | Intresting | Scoop.it
Paul MacInnes: A recently published Harvard study suggests that we're more likely to be economical with the truth when our brain gets tired

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Good afternoon, how are you doing? I have to say your hair looks wonderful, and whatever perfume that is, it's delightful. In fact, it's precisely the same scent as Alexa Chung wears. Yes, she was telling me as much just last week when we were in that hot tub together in Berne waiting for Vladimir. Vladimir Putin. He's just hired me and Alexa as consultants in the campaign to preserve the Siberian tiger. Yeah, it's a really great job. I get paid in pelts.

Sorry about that, couldn't help myself. You see it's past midday and I find it very easy not to lie. Sorry, I mean very difficult. Neither am I alone – or am I? – as results of a study at Harvard University this week have found that lying in the afternoon comes naturally to humans. And not just humans, but animals, fish and even trees.

"As ethics researchers, we had been running experiments examining various unethical behaviors, such as lying, stealing, and cheating," said ethics researchers Maryam Kouchaki and Isaac Smith in a highly attentive press release. "We noticed that experiments conducted in the morning seemed to systematically result in lower instances of unethical behaviour."


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WATCH: Where Fear Lives In The Brain

WATCH: Where Fear Lives In The Brain | Intresting | Scoop.it
Do you love haunted houses? Can't get enough of horror movies?
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Scientists voice fears over ethics of drug trials remaining unpublished

Scientists voice fears over ethics of drug trials remaining unpublished | Intresting | Scoop.it
Almost a third of large clinical trials in the US still not published five years after being finished, scientists write in BMJ (Scientists voice fears over #ethics of #drug trials remaining unpublished #pharma
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NASA is Talking to Spacecraft Via Laser

NASA is Talking to Spacecraft Via Laser | Intresting | Scoop.it
The inside story of this weekend's historic laser-based space communication test.
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The Science of Stage Fright and How to Overcome It

The Science of Stage Fright and How to Overcome It | Intresting | Scoop.it

Palms sweaty, heart racing, too panicked to even breathe? No, you aren't being stalked by some monster ): you're about to speak in public!

 

While some would claim public speaking is a fate "worse than death," public speaking might actually feel worsethan death: at least you won't feel stage fright in death! If public speaking is so nerve-racking, do genetics cause social anxiety?

 

Stage Fright

 

At some point in your life, you will have to communicate in front of people. Learning what stage fright really is could make you more comfortable doing so. Basically you, as a human, are wired to care about your reputation or what people think of you. So what happens if you get up there and forget a few lines or completely bomb a speech? This fear of being considered an idiot by your peers is a natural instinct called the flight or fight response, a primitive function in your brain that acts to self-protect at all times. The flight or fight response is a very difficult thing to control. Though it's present in all animals, most creatures don't have to get up in front of the entire animal kingdom to make any speeches!


Via The Learning Factor
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David Hain's curator insight, October 14, 2013 2:07 AM

Happens to us all - some good ideas here.

Cath Daley's curator insight, October 14, 2013 7:54 AM

There are alternatives to it being a fact of life. Using technqiues that change your physiological and emotional state can eradicate stage fright for ever. You kust need to learn how.

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10 Reasons Your Top Talent Will Leave You

10 Reasons Your Top Talent Will Leave You | Intresting | Scoop.it

Via The Learning Factor
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Barbara Preyssas's curator insight, October 11, 2013 6:20 AM

Ok, so it's not quite Sensory Emotions - but it's really interesting anyway :)

Brian Martin's curator insight, October 11, 2013 12:05 PM

A great reminder for Leaders and HR Departments everywhere.

Russ Bergeman's curator insight, October 11, 2013 1:35 PM

Retaining good and talented employees requires maximizing their full performance potential. This is not only good for employee retention, it is also good for the overall performance of the organization. 

 

This article makes some great points about why people leave organizations.

 

It all starts with establishing and communicating an organizational culture, then hiring people who fit into and will perpetuate the culture. This is only possible when leaders have a solid understanding of what motivates and what demotivates their people. Without this understanding, it is nearly impossible to get the most out of people.

 

Russ

russ@theemployersedge.com

www.theemployersedge.com

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Six principles of psychology which affect analytics and decision making | Econsultancy

Six principles of psychology which affect analytics and decision making | Econsultancy | Intresting | Scoop.it

The success of analytics within a business is not just about numbers, technology and processes, it's about how we integrate between analysts and marketers. set out six principles of psychology which affect analytics and decision making...


Via Bonnie Hohhof
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Asif's curator insight, October 12, 2013 10:47 AM

The success of analytics within a business

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Facebook Will Let You Save Links to Read Later

Facebook Will Let You Save Links to Read Later | Intresting | Scoop.it

Mark Zuckerberg has described his social network as a "personalized newspaper" — and for seasoned users with a wide-range of like-minded friends, it's hard not to argue that the articles that pop up in your news feed constitute the most engrossing...


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The Hyper-Efficient, Highly Scientific Scheme to Help the World's Poor - Wired Science

The Hyper-Efficient, Highly Scientific Scheme to Help the World's Poor - Wired Science | Intresting | Scoop.it

In 1993, after five years of grad school and low-wage postdoctoral research, Michael Kremer got a job as a professor of economics at MIT. With his new salary, he finally had enough money to fund a long-held desire: to return to Kenya’s Western Province, where he had lived for a year after college, teaching in a rural farming community. He wanted to see the place again, reconnect with his host family and other friends he’d made there.

When he arrived the next summer, he found out that one of those friends had begun working for an education nonprofit called ICS Africa. At the time, there was a campaign, spearheaded by the World Bank, to provide free textbooks throughout sub-Saharan Africa, on the assumption that this would boost test scores and keep children in school longer. ICS had tasked Kremer’s friend with identifying target schools for such a giveaway.

While chatting with his friend about this, Kremer began to wonder: How did ICS know the campaign would work? It made sense in theory—free textbooks should mean more kids read them, so more kids learn from them—but they had no evidence to back that up. On the spot, Kremer suggested a rigorous way to evaluate the program: Identify twice the number of qualifying schools as it had the money to support. Then randomly pick half of those schools to receive the textbooks, while the rest got none. By comparing outcomes between the two cohorts, they could gauge whether the textbooks were making a difference.


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Essential Skills for Analyzing Social Data

Essential Skills for Analyzing Social Data | Intresting | Scoop.it
Today, technology can definitely take the edge off the burden of analyzing social data. Social listening technologies extrapolate insights from real-time monitoring and machine learning.

Via Bonnie Hohhof
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Ellen Naylor's curator insight, November 12, 2013 10:45 AM

More than ever, with all this technology & big data, you need people to analyze it so your company can act on it.

Lydia's Marketing & Communication Consulting's curator insight, November 12, 2013 10:48 AM

Nice article, includes a framework for mining insights from data.

Estefanía Aguilar's curator insight, November 13, 2013 5:26 AM

data has no sense without a skilled professional

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Scientists find black hole spewing iron, nickel in powerful jets - Los Angeles Times

Scientists find black hole spewing iron, nickel in powerful jets - Los Angeles Times | Intresting | Scoop.it
Christian Science Monitor Scientists find black hole spewing iron, nickel in powerful jets Los Angeles Times Writing in the journal Nature, a team of scientists said it found traces of nickel and iron in the powerful jets shooting out of black hole...
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Three Reasons Why The CD Is Still Important - Forbes

Three Reasons Why The CD Is Still Important - Forbes | Intresting | Scoop.it
Three Reasons Why The CD Is Still Important
Forbes
The only problem with that statement is that the CD is not yet deceased by a long shot, and it's still a real tool in the belt of artists and bands everywhere.
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Maybe We're Making It Too Easy For The Machines To Take Over

Maybe We're Making It Too Easy For The Machines To Take Over | Intresting | Scoop.it
Machines that can think for themselves attached to a global brain with the ability to self replicate? Yeah, we're making that happen.

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We have seen the future, and it's starting to look a lot like Skynet.

That self-aware computer system—yes, the one that tries to exterminate the human race in the Terminator movies (and one TV show)—is a potent symbol of Frankensteinian hubris. It is mirrored in the Singularity, the idea that technological progress will soon hit exponential growth, leading to self-aware robots and artificial intelligence that seize control of their own destiny, rendering humans irrelevant if not extinct. (Unless people go transhuman first, although that's another article entirely.)

The Singularity may never happen. Artificial intelligence—long predicted, never realized—may be much harder to achieve than we think. An emerging computer consciousness might pass through a period of infancy, during which humanity might be able to take countermeasures of one sort or another. Self-aware robots might turn out to be benevolent, or even completely uninterested in humanity. It's impossible to predict.


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Fuji Instax Mini 90 Hands-on: A Glorious and Weird Instant Film Camera @ Weeder

Fuji Instax Mini 90 Hands-on: A Glorious and Weird Instant Film Camera http://t.co/GeNBXb0Z6h #photography #gadgets #tech
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25 Lessons Learned (or Reconfirmed) in Year Four Away from Corporate Life

25 Lessons Learned (or Reconfirmed) in Year Four Away from Corporate Life | Intresting | Scoop.it
Every year around this time, I do a column looking back at twenty-five lessons learned or reconfirmed during the past year of The Brainzooming Group. Since we’re approaching four years away from co...

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Anita's curator insight, October 24, 2013 1:56 PM

Are you ready to step away from corporate life like Mike?

 

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Quantum Computers And The End Of Security

Quantum Computers And The End Of Security | Intresting | Scoop.it

Quantum computing and quantum communications; these concepts were invented just 30 years ago, after scientific journals refused to issue earlier publications regarding these subjects because it looked more like science-fiction. Nowadays, quantum systems really do exist, with some of them reaching the stage of commercial sales. Quantum computers raise and answer new questions in the security field, primarily in cryptography.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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IT's curator insight, October 11, 2013 11:46 PM

Kde bude člověk za 30 let s Quantem? ...

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Can we get all the nature we need in digital form? – Sue Thomas – Aeon

Can we get all the nature we need in digital form? – Sue Thomas – Aeon | Intresting | Scoop.it
We surf the net, stream our films and save stuff in the cloud. Can we get all the nature we need from the digital world?

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But what do we mean when we refer to ‘nature’? It’s a common term that seems to have an assumed collective meaning, often romanticised and sentimental. We speak of ‘getting back to nature’ as if there was once a prelapsarian baseline before we humans interfered and spoiled it. Gary Snyder, the American poet and environmentalist, offers alternative definitions from which we can choose. In The Practice of the Wild (1990), he distils down to two ways in which the term ‘nature’ is usually interpreted. One, he argues, is the outdoors: ‘the physical world, including all living things. Nature by this definition is a norm of the world that is apart from the features or products of civilisation and human will. The machine, the artefact, the devised, or the extraordinary (like a two-headed calf) is spoken of as “unnatural”.’The other meaning is much broader, taking the first and adding to it all the products of human action and intention. Snyder calls it the material world and all its collective objects and phenomena. ‘Science and some sorts of mysticism rightly propose that everything is natural,’ he writes. In this sense, ‘there is nothing unnatural about New York City, or toxic wastes, or atomic energy, and nothing — by definition — that we do or experience in life is “unnatural”.’ That, of course, includes the products of technology. This is Snyder’s preferred definition — and mine too. However, though it’s not always made clear, I’d venture a guess that environmental psychologists might have a preference for the former, human-free definition of nature.


Via Wildcat2030
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Ji-Wei's curator insight, October 10, 2013 11:48 PM
There are real aquariums and aquarium wallpapers on smartphones. A study at the University of Pennsylvania shows that when patients were they taken in for surgery, and they had removed and placed the fish tank. On days where the fish tank was there, it showed that the patients had less anxiety. My question is how can this be implemented in other places than a hospital.
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Bose SoundTouch Is a Simple, Sonos-Like Wireless Music System

Bose SoundTouch Is a Simple, Sonos-Like Wireless Music System | Intresting | Scoop.it

Meet Bose SoundTouch, a combination of hardware and software aimed at making the easiest, most seamless wireless music system ever. It's a direct shot at Sonos's excellent system from one of the most recognizable names in consumer audio.


Via Guillaume Decugis
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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, October 11, 2013 2:37 AM
The ability to stream your music all over the house looks fantastic.
Richard Platt's curator insight, February 13, 2014 5:54 PM

More on the Bose SoundTouch that others have tried to do, it's good to see that Bose made a stab at this, it is more likely going to be successful in getting adoption / acceptance of the wireless music throughout the home than others due to the fact that it's married to an actual product that people already like.....One of the strategies for successful adoption a new tech (when attempting to move up the S-curve of adoption) is to marry it with another technology that is already being accepted by the marketplace.