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Into the Driver's Seat
Building the independence of learners through thoughtful uses of technology
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Origins of Common UI Symbols | Visual.ly

Origins of Common UI Symbols | Visual.ly | Into the Driver's Seat | Scoop.it

They are road signs for your daily rituals—the instantly recognized symbols and icons you press, click and ogle countless times a day when you interact with your computer. But how much do you know about their origins?


Via Lauren Moss, Jim Lerman
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Search 80,0000 Media History Digital Library Artifacts ~ Free Technology for Teachers

Search 80,0000 Media History Digital Library Artifacts ~ Free Technology for Teachers | Into the Driver's Seat | Scoop.it

by Richard Byrne

 

"The Media History Digital Library is a massive archive of documents about the history film, television, and radio. The library can now be searched and the documents viewed online through MHDL's new site called the Lantern. On Lantern you will find reviews and critiques of movies, books and playbills, many periodicals about the movie, television, and radio industries. Your search can be refined according to date, language, and publication type. You can also browse through collections curated by MHDL.

Applications for Education

"Two thoughts came to mind as I browsed through MHDL's Lantern. First, it's obviously an excellent resource for students studying the history and development of media. Second, through MHDL's Lantern you could find some good examples of how to write a critique. Your students could use those as models for writing their own critiques of movies or even of books."

 

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Tricia Adams's curator insight, August 29, 2013 7:49 AM

What an amazing resource - and you can search within individual issues of film magazines - I shall be using this for lots of personal research on old films...

Margaret Waage's curator insight, August 29, 2013 10:50 AM

Back to school - great resource - thank you!!

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, September 1, 2013 1:55 PM

Without words... excellent applications for education in particular for students of history and development of media.

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6 Teenage Inventors That Changed The World

6 Teenage Inventors That Changed The World | Into the Driver's Seat | Scoop.it

Great piece. Visually stunning. Very informative. -JL

 

From the article:

Give a kid a car and he's probably going to see how high he can ramp it off something. But that shouldn't negate the fact that some very ambitious teens have changed the world.


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WhatWasThere - Put history in its place!

WhatWasThere - Put history in its place! | Into the Driver's Seat | Scoop.it

Description by Internet Scout Project


"Have you ever walked by a busy street corner and wondered what was there 20, 30, 50, or 60 years ago? If you have, the WhatWasThere site may be able to provide you with answers. The premise of the site is simple: the team at WhatWasThere has provided a platform where anyone can upload a photograph with two tags (location and year) so that others can learn more about the built environment. Visitors can Navigate Through Time to look around at different cities or they can use the Explore Photos area to do that in more detail. Over 30,000 photos and sites are available here and the coverage is particularly strong in San Francisco, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, Detroit, and the Northeast."

Jim Lerman's insight:

What a terrific idea!

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Why Historical Maps Still Matter So Much, Even Today

Why Historical Maps Still Matter So Much, Even Today | Into the Driver's Seat | Scoop.it

With 150,000 or so old print maps to his name, David Rumsey has earned his reputed place among the world's "finest private collectors." He continues to expand his personal trove as well as the digitized sub-collection he makes open to the public online — some 38,000 strong, and growing.


He's created a series of interactive maps that layer old prints onto the Google Earth and Google Maps platforms, and this summer he plans to launch a geo-referencing tool (similar to one recently introduced by the British Library) that lets users get involved in the digital mapping process themselves.

While preparing for this next expansion of his online map empire, Rumsey remains fascinated by "the power of putting these images up and letting them go," he says.

"Maps have a way of speaking to people very straightforward," he says. "You don't have to have a lot of knowledge of map history or history in general. To me they're perfect tools for teaching history to the public."


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