Into the Driver's Seat
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Technology-Enhanced Social-Emotional Activities

Technology-Enhanced Social-Emotional Activities | Into the Driver's Seat | Scoop.it
Source:  http://www.projecthappiness.org/programs/social-emotional-learning/

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 11, 2013 6:18 AM

This new website from Jackie Gerstein explores technology use in social and emotional learning. Quoting from the site "This website has been designed to describe technology activities that facilitate social emotional learing.The links in the menu lead to descriptions of the individual activities. They can be sued within formal and inforrmal educational setting. Even though the focus of the activities are on building and enhacing social emtional learning, many can be connected with content standards related to language arts, oral communication, media literacy, and ISTE's National Education Standards for Students."

The website is very easy to use. There is a menu that provides a list of 14 activities, including Conflict Management Strategies Posters, Book Trailers, and Teach Tech to Grandparents. Most have samples of projects. Not all are relevant to all ages but she does state that she has used some with both elementary and college students.

 

Into the Driver's Seat
Building the independence of learners through thoughtful uses of technology
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Harnessing the Incredible Learning Potential of the Adolescent Brain | #LEARNing2LEARN #Research

Harnessing the Incredible Learning Potential of the Adolescent Brain | #LEARNing2LEARN #Research | Into the Driver's Seat | Scoop.it
“[Adolescence is] a stage of life when we can really thrive, but we need to take advantage of the opportunity,” said Temple University neuroscientist Laurence Steinberg at a Learning and the Brain conference in Boston. Steinberg has spent his career studying how the adolescent brain develops and believes there is a fundamental disconnect between the popular characterizations of adolescents and what’s really going on in their brains.

Because the brain is still developing during adolescence, it has incredible plasticity. It’s akin to the first five years of life, when a child’s brain is growing and developing new pathways all the time in response to experiences. Adult brains are somewhat plastic as well — otherwise they wouldn’t be able to learn new things — but “brain plasticity in adulthood involves minor changes to existing circuits, not the wholesale development of new ones or elimination of others,” Steinberg said.

 

The adolescent brain is exquisitely sensitive to experience,” Steinberg said. “It is like the recording device is turned up to a different level of sensitivity.” That’s why humans tend to remember even the most mundane events from adolescence much better than even important events that took place later in life. It also means adolescence could be an extremely important window for learning that sticks. Steinberg notes this window is also lengthening as scientists observe the onset of puberty happening earlier and young people taking on adult roles later in life. Between these two factors, one biological and one social, adolescence researchers now generally say the period lasts 15 years between the ages of 10 and 25.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Brain

 

Use #Andragogy UP from 11 years:

 

 https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/05/13/andragogy-adult-teaching-how-to-teach-ict/

 


Via Gust MEES, John Rudkin
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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 3, 2016 9:55 AM
[Adolescence is] a stage of life when we can really thrive, but we need to take advantage of the opportunity,” said Temple University neuroscientist Laurence Steinberg at a Learning and the Brain conference in Boston. Steinberg has spent his career studying how the adolescent brain develops and believes there is a fundamental disconnect between the popular characterizations of adolescents and what’s really going on in their brains.

Because the brain is still developing during adolescence, it has incredible plasticity. It’s akin to the first five years of life, when a child’s brain is growing and developing new pathways all the time in response to experiences. Adult brains are somewhat plastic as well — otherwise they wouldn’t be able to learn new things — but “brain plasticity in adulthood involves minor changes to existing circuits, not the wholesale development of new ones or elimination of others,” Steinberg said.

 

The adolescent brain is exquisitely sensitive to experience,” Steinberg said. “It is like the recording device is turned up to a different level of sensitivity.” That’s why humans tend to remember even the most mundane events from adolescence much better than even important events that took place later in life